Ye Olde Metalheads Thread (post up if your 30 yrs +)

Discussion in 'General Music Discussion' started by M3CHK1LLA, Sep 16, 2013.

  1. wilch

    wilch SS.org Regular

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    Plus, you're only as old as the girl you feel!


    ...and my fiance is 7 years younger than me. wooo, still in my 20's, f' yeah! :shred:
     
  2. Nails In Your Coffin

    Nails In Your Coffin SS.org Regular

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    Well, shit, I'm already too old to participate in this reindeer game. :noplease:

    ...But I'm going to, anyway.

    It all started for me when I was at the library. Back then, we could rent records. I used to love thumbing through them, and then I came upon the coolest thing I ever saw...the Gene Simmons solo record. I liked the "scary face." As I continued to thumb, I discovered Ace's, Paul's, and Peter's solo records, but Gene was always my favorite. I was about 7 years old.

    So, I'd always take the four records to rent, even if I didn't listen to them. I was basically just really liked looking at them, because I thought they looked cool. After overcoming the initial infatuation with the imagery, I started playing them. I absolutely loved Gene's solo record.

    That eventually wore off, and then I heard Quiet Riot's "Metal Health" record...after first hearing "Cum On Feel the Noise" first, of course. From there, I just launched right into Metal. :hbang: I just kept craving heavier and heavier bands. My real "breakthrough" came when our babysitter brought over an Iron Maiden "Live After Death" cassette. It was the heaviest thing I'd ever heard and the first time I heard it, I wasn't sure I liked it. After the third time, I was hooked.

    One thing I can clearly remember is the first time I saw Metallica's "Kill'em All" record. I was at the grocery store and it was in a rack. I couldn't even pronounce their name. I pronounced it "Meta-Lisa." :lol: Well, I flipped it over, and the first thought was, "These are some of the ugliest people I'd ever seen. They just look like they suck." :nuts:

    Yeah, eventually, I discovered "Meta-Lisa" were pretty awesome and eventually became my favorite band for a very long time.

    ...And then, of course, came the guitars. Dave Mustaine has a B.C. Rich, so I had to have one. I figured since he played one, they must have been the greatest guitars in the world. I came across one I could afford and bought the first one I found. My other option was an Aria Pro II ZZ with the "blood" paintjob. Thinking back, I probably should have gotten the Aria Pro II. Considering I refer to this one as my "C.C. Deville Special," it's easily identifiable in the below photograph.

    [​IMG]

    Yes, so that's what the guitar "fetish" turned into; 11 guitars, and one on order. :metal:

    And so, it's years later, and I'm still as "Metal" as ever. I still love to crank it up while I'm out in the car, windows down. When I'm in traffic and listening to Overkill or Slayer, so are everyone around me. I still wear a few Saxon and Iron Maiden shirts from time to time, and I own a classic "Headbanger Leather Jacket." You all know what I'm talking about. I'll go on record as saying I wear it with pride, along with everything else, and whoever either thinks I'm too old or outdated can kiss my ass. I march to my own beat and what I wear doesn't affect anyone else, so they have no reason to care. When it's warm enough, I'll wear my Converse All-Stars and camouflage shorts that come right below the knee, along with all my nasty skulled-up Affliction shirts. That's my thing and I don't hide the fact.

    Each year, since 2012, my wife and I attend the "Monsters of Rock Cruise." this year, it's the end of this month, and yes, we will be on it. Contrary to what everyone may wanna think, Tesla, Cinderella, and L.A. Guns still have very strong fanbases. They haven't gone anywhere, and they still have their fans. The only reason everyone thinks they're has-beens are because they receive very little promotion these days, but trust me, the fans are still there. These guys put on shows like they did in their 20s, they aren't just standing there in one place, playing old classics like "Nobody's Fool."

    These days, while I may be 40 years old come March 27th of this year, I haven't changed since I was a teen. The only things that have changed are my responsibilities, and the fact I'm no longer lighting bags of dogshit on the neighbor's step and running after ringing the doorbell. I still love to talk music, listen to the heaviest thing I can find, strike poses in front of my wife when I fart, etc.

    I could never understand why there was an "age restriction" for having fun. People are always saying, "Aren't you a little old to be listening to all that noise and wearing t-shirts with skulls on them?" Am I? Or, could it possibly be that my passion and life are Metal and I love every aspect of it? Metal has given me so much to be thankful for in life, and damned if I'll ever abandon it just because some dickweed thinks I'm too old for it. :hbang:

    And yeah, my old ass'll see you young guys in the pit. I ain't jumpin' out until I got a bloody nose and a footprint on my forehead. :hbang:
     
  3. The Q

    The Q The Engineer

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    I'm far from a Metalhead (because I don't identify myself from the music I listen to and because I'm not limited to Metal), but I'm closing in 32 soon and Ι can feel it. Your priorities change, your stamina goes down fast, you don't easily identify with the younger generation (what the #@*$ are you youngins listenin' to? Damn kids).

    It was an interesting time in the older days in regards to music, mostly thanks to the lack of internet; when you managed to find a tape or an LP of a great band, you'd treasure it like hell. Music almost became a quest onto itself, especially if you lived in places that didn't have access to more obscure music. This has deteriorated nowadays thanks to the Internet, but I'm all for the easy discovery and digital formats (because Nyquist to all 44/16 haters) that we have now.
     
  4. VBCheeseGrater

    VBCheeseGrater not quite a shredder

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    :hbang: well said, well said

    We have a big gig coming up next weekend at a local hot spot (new venue for us, new singer, etc) - I feel pretty damn excited about it. Still work a 9-5 job and all, but can still rock the f*ck out within the framework of "Responsible Adult". At our gigs at local bars, it's surprising how well some of our more heavy stuff goes over like Pantera and Slipknot. We tend to pull a 35-40 type age range, and folks love it when we bust out "Walk" for instance
     
  5. Nails In Your Coffin

    Nails In Your Coffin SS.org Regular

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    I definitely treasured a good record when I found one, and back then, bands needed to measure up. While they certainly got pushes from the record companies, the fans were the ones who really did the advertising and spread the word. If a band didn't measure up, word didn't spread. There was no internet as you said. These days, bands are just "out there." People will hear about them, whether they're good or bad. Take a band today who aren't nearly as good as one of the older bands and just because of social media, that crappy band are exposed to a lot more people, and may just sell more records than the talented bands from our era ever did.

    As for labeling myself, I've never done any such thing. Ever. I've always just been my individual self. When I refer to myself as a "Metalhead," it means I'm an absolute fan of Metal. I certainly listen to other types of music, but Metal is my thing. We can't be "Metal" all the time. I know some guys who try way to hard to be "Metal." They almost advertise it as if to make a statement and prove a point, "I'm more Metal than you are." I dunno, but that's kinda poserish behavior, IMO.

    Yep. I know a lot of people who have cut their hair, have wives, kids, have gotten cursed into driving a Dodge Caravan or Toyota Sienna, but they're the biggest Pantera fans on the planet. Talk to a lot of them and they're disappointed they have to look professional for their jobs and can't have tattoos all over them and hair down to their asses. I feel bad for these people, men and women alike, because some of them are just ready to burst out. It never feels good to have to suppress who you really are.

    For a while, I hadn't worn a concert shirt or Affliction shirt in nearly 15 years. Then, one day, I was talking to a friend of mine about it and it just hit me like a ton of bricks. "Ya know what, I'm gonna wear what the hell I want and be myself. I'm sick and tired of putting on a front and trying to be something I'm not. I'm miserable." Within a week, I had a leather jacket, jeans, Converse All-Stars, and dusted off a pair of Dr. Martens that had been collecting dust in my closet for the better part of a decade and a half.

    Don't get me wrong, when I go to work, I dress professionally like everyone else does, but when I'm on my downtime, that's an entirely different story. I actually ran into someone from work one day and she was surprised as hell when she saw me. She was like, "Dan, is that you? WOW! I had you pinned for a real professional-type guy! I had no idea!! Just...WOW!" We must've talked about Metal for about an hour. I had her pinned as a "Pop" fan. As it turned out, she was going to see Testament and Overkill the following week! :bowdown:

    What's really funny about that story with running into my coworker, was that she told me the next day I saw her at work that I inspired her to loosen up a bit. She was kinda in the same boat I was in; dressing and portraying the image everyone else thought she should portray. A few weeks later, she told me her parents were in shock when she went over and visited them, wearing a Megadeth shirt. :hbang:
     
  6. AVH

    AVH avhguitarrepair.com Forum MVP

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    Late to this, so I'll have to backtrack and read the whole thread...
    I might be among the most ancient fossil here, just turned 50, and been into heavy music since I was little kid back to about '71 or so...oh there's soooooo much I could contribute to this, a few of my buds call me Allosaurus. :lol:
     
  7. Bear R.

    Bear R. Bear R.-

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    1980..KISS Alive II..whoa...God of Thunder..my brother and I up until then ,lived in south Pheonix az..so,all we knew from 80 on back was disco..ha,ha.we knew and hung w/Mexicans,chicanos..we were the only white kids around..and a red head and blonde at that. we always had long hair though,Levis,and Converse Hi tops a flannel shirt tied around our waist.bandanna in the back pocket.we actually brought this look to the north side of phoenix.at least in our part of town.everyone around us were prepies,rich kids..and here we come.dressed like that..they laughed at us the 1st year but the second year everyone was dressing like us..we were called long hair freaks,...ya baby that was livin..that's when we moved to the north side of town..then, we got introduced into Metal..after Kiss alive II our buddy turned us onto AC/DC's Back in Black..then it was really on..from there Metal Massacre albums,from Metal Church to Venom..then,ManOwar,Helloween,Iron Maiden,then it was Yngwie' s Marchin out album for me..then Hendrix,Stevie ray Vaughn,ect...when I heard these guys.it was time to learn how to play guitar..then it happened..i bought my 1st guitar.it was a Harmony Explorer model..Black w/red pinstripes..i put red dice for knobs,drilled em out and installed 'em.so there ya go..1985,86 I bought my 1st guitar...28 yrs later and tons of beautiful guitars later, im still playin and love it..thanks for the Memories that just came back..i could write a book.well,we could all writes books im sure.but,just to share a tiny part of a chapter in our lives is cool to me... thanks..God Bless you all..Barry.. ps..even though I think Ywngie is the baddest guitarist to come around back then..my Ultimate guitarist is and will always be..Randy Rhoads..RIP..my friend..what he could've brought to metal w/his Classical playing combined would've been unbelivable..we will never know what he coulda brought to the table.before and after Yngwie got here..but it would've been behond belief though.he had so many plans.and didn't get to live hardly any of them..im so sorry Randy....thanks again guys,gals....Barry..
     
  8. mjbg

    mjbg SS.org Regular

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    31.. feeling like 16..

    first album ive bought was Iron Maiden - Fear of the Dark cassete tape because i liked the cover art.. i was like 11-12yo..
     
  9. Nails In Your Coffin

    Nails In Your Coffin SS.org Regular

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    I bought a Manowar's "Kings of Metal" record because I liked the cover art. Too bad the record wasn't as cool as the cover art. :noway:
     
  10. The Q

    The Q The Engineer

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    You make a good point here. I might offer as a counterargument that this might allow those bad musicians to improve themselves and be encouraged by the signs of support. Even people who make their beginning from forums like this and Soundcloud/Bandcamp have it much better than 10 or 20 years ago.

    There were many great bands that failed to make a dent and they were far from bad; sometimes the reasons can be completely out of your control. Even so, I don't mind if a bad band manages to sell copies, because I'm busy being grateful for the ability to be exposed to great stuff :hbang:!
     
  11. ZeroS1gnol

    ZeroS1gnol SS.org Regular

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    Im 31...glady, I don't feel old at all. I even do weirder stuff than when I ws a lot younger.
     
  12. Lukifer

    Lukifer Need more gain

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    I know one thing for sure. I need to get my ass to the gym becausemy metabolism started to slow at 26 now Im 30 and its at a crawl. Plus I drink too much, so I need to burn some calories and get back to 200 atleast. Got out of the US Army in 2009 at 190lbs now im 245lbs!! If I was mexican I could go for the Dino Cazares look.....
     
  13. Nails In Your Coffin

    Nails In Your Coffin SS.org Regular

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    Oh, there are still many bands who fail to make a dent, who will blow away just about anything out there today as far as this "new" Metal. Check out this indie radio station called NewUSB. There are some amazing musicians I've heard on that station. Just send them your music, no matter how good or bad, and they will play it. They are a great bunch and really are out there to help unsigned artists. Check it out at NewUSB Radio - Profiling the very best of the best in independent music from around the world..
     
  14. lucasreis

    lucasreis ERG Ambassador

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    I agree.

    I'm 30, will be 31 in May, and I don't feel old at all. I listen to a lot of new stuff and I swear I know a bunch of people that are in their 20's and even below 20's and they only listen to old stuff. Sometimes I feel younger than those people in my mind... in a way that I still listen to heavy stuff and I like listening to new bands all the time, I always have a thrill of discovering new songs, new bands, and I know people in their 20's who have "settled" and abandoned metal because they think it's for youngster. I mean, .... that shit... I don't feel old at all. :fawk:
     
  15. lucasreis

    lucasreis ERG Ambassador

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    This is my biggest problem. I don't drink, but my metabolism ....ing sucks and I'm getting fatter. I just got back to the gym today to try to lose some weight hehe
     
  16. Metalman X

    Metalman X The Resplendent Sub-Human

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    ah, awesome thread!

    Though I hardly consider myself "old", but yes, I'm 34 as of 2 weeks ago. Always been more of an old school metal guy too in a lot of ways. Like, even in the mid 90's (my late teen years) I was REALLY getting into/discovering what would end up being one of my lifes greatest passions. I was rocking the denim vest with back patches, big spiked gauntlets, black band tee's etc. and learning old Slayer and TYestament, and Overkill riffs while all the others we're jizzing over Korn, Staind, Creed, etc. 'Twas dark times for trying to form a band back than. NOBODY was into the shit I was getting into. Even my old bass player, who was getting into his 30's at the time was always saying I needed to "get with the times" "thrash is dead, and death and black metal is just too extreme to ever catch on". Kinda' funny how now thrash has seen a VERY huge revival, and now p[eople actually know what black metal is!

    Noty much has changed for me. I still listen to mostly the same stuff, still write the same stuff... hell, the only real changes even to my wardrobe is hat everything is much larger to accommodate the extra 175lbs I gained since my late teens/early 29's (though it's mostly plain black or novelty t's now... band shirts very rarely come in 3X and 4X sizes, sadly).

    Metal for ....in' life here! :hbang:
     
  17. Henry Terry

    Henry Terry SS.org Regular

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    I have been on my Heavy Metal quest for a long time. I was born in February, 1947, and I do not intend to stop listening to Heavy Metal until I die. To me, the music distills the essence of rock ’n roll - the excitement that it creates when played loudly and the renegade attitude (needed in a world that increasingly shys away from the passionate and leans toward the cautious).

    I encourage all of you to stick with it, unless/until you genuinely no longer like it. Do not let people shame you into stopping by telling you to “grow up.” Too many people, when they tell you to “grow up,” really mean to abandon your dreams and the things that you really like so that you can be like they are, because they are frightened of the passion and frightened of renegades. If your significant other thinks you need to “grow up” and stop playing and listening to Heavy Metal, you might want to point out that it was your renegade nature which was the attraction in the first place.

    I’m reminded of a passage in a book that I read recently, “If we can still surmount what is natural and believe what we wish to believe, in spite of the force of evidence, then for a while at least, we are masters of our fate, and we can paint the world we want. . . .” Perhaps we can also change the world by being ourselves without being defensive.

    I heard my first electric guitar “live” in 1960 (and fell in love with the sound). I first became interested in Heavy Metal in 1969/1970. The first band that I heard called by that name was Grand Funk Railroad, followed by Deep Purple. Over the years, I’ve bought many Heavy Metal LPs and CDs. I was one of the multitude that bought Judas Priest’s British Steel when it was released. I was one of those who encouraged Ritchie Blackmore’s quest by buying Rainbow’s Straight Between The Eyes when it was released. I’ve continued my Heavy Metal buying with CDs by Angel Dust, Dark Tranquility, Carcass, Emperor, Obituary, Dimmu Borgir, Fear Factory, Iced Earth, King Diamond, and many others. Two of my favorite concerts were one by Morbid Angel (Twister’s, Richmond, Virginia, 1998) and a Black Metal Fest, headlined by Emperor (Twister’s, Richmond, Virginia, July, 1999).

    While in college, I was part of the late 60s hippie counterculture in the Boston area, and I saw many of the famous bands of the era - The Who, Jefferson Airplane, Vanilla Fudge, Jeff Beck, Led Zeppeln, Janice Joplin (with Big Brother and the Holding Company), among others. However, the two acts that influenced me most were the Jimi Hendrix Experience and Cream. Cream had its “farewell tour” in the fall of 1968, and I rode down to Providence, Rhode Island on the back of my roommate’s motorcycle to see them. I saw Hendrix in concert twice - at the Singer Bowl in Queens, New York in August, 1968 and at Boston Garden in May/June, 1970. In concert, both Clapton and Hendrix displayed real power (technical skill, phrasing, “mojo”) in the context of the “power trio,” and I was hooked on the concept of a group consisting solely of guitar, bass and drums.


    The following year, 1969, I bought my first professional quality equipment - a Gibson SG Standard and a Fender Twin Reverb. However, I was plagued by unrelated issues at the time and abandoned the guitar after a few months. In 1975, I returned to playing the guitar and have not put it down since. Over the years, I have owned and played many other guitars - two Fender Stratocasters, an Ibanez Artist 2618, a Gibson Les Paul Standard, a Hamer Californian, and a G&L Legacy. Presently, I have a Jackson SLSMG which I bought in 2005. I replaced the passive pickups with two EMG 81s. Over the years, I have owned many amps - a second Fender Twin, a Fender Dual Showman with a 2x15 cabinet, a Peavey VTM120 with a Peavey 412MS speaker cabinet (Sheffield speakers), a Fender Deluxe Reverb reissue and a Marshall stack consisting of a JCM900 2100 SL-X with a 1960A and a 1960B speaker cabinet. I will continue to play loud and play dirty, and I advise all of you to do the same.

    Do NOT worry about how old you are.


    Henry Terry
     
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  18. AngstRiddenDreams

    AngstRiddenDreams Filthy Casual

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    This should be the "Ye Old Saggy Nutsacks" thread.
     
  19. Noxon

    Noxon Is a Lurker

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    Respect your elders, son. The nut sacks may be old, but they're more than enough to choke you on. Now apologize before I send you to bed without dinner...
     
  20. Andless

    Andless SS.org Regular

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    This exact thing happened to me. The 80:s hairier metal that I used to love I was never able to get back to... Now its Alt or 70:s metal rather than 80:s.

    I still have a soft spot for a select few of the 80:s thrash metal tho, and when I write nowadays, a lot of it has traces of both 90:s Alt. and 80:s thrash.


    True, and this is one thing I loved about metal. Now, I have the feeling that enter year 2000, there is very little of "rebel" left in any music style. It's been reduced to alternative / mainstream division at best.
     

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