Who makes the best videos? Informative yet keeps you interested

Discussion in 'Music Theory, Lessons & Techniques' started by Jacksonluvr636, Jul 11, 2016.

  1. Jacksonluvr636

    Jacksonluvr636 SS.org Regular

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    Maybe I have ADD, I am unsure but many videos I see on youtube are a snoozefest.

    I want to learn some basic theory (something I feel I skipped over) and also some advance scales/modes and how to apply them.

    I have been looking for a local guitar teacher as well but I figured youtube would be a good place.

    TLDR; I am looking for the best of both worlds. Someone who has some serious skills, can teach them in a way that makes sense and does not make me want to fall asleep.

    Generally, who makes good instructional videos?

    So far the best one for me was not on youtube. Speed Kills by Michael Angelo Batio was a great dvd.
     
  2. takotakumi

    takotakumi SS.org Regular

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    Not really theory but more like tutorials, licks, and techniques but...

    Uncle Ben's (Ben Eller) videos are super educative and entertaining. He explains them in a way where they are very easy to grasp and funny at the same time.
     
  3. QuantumCybin

    QuantumCybin Lost In Thought

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    Yeah I have to agree about Ben's videos. I still suck at guitar but I don't suck as much. I particularly love his sweep picking tutorials; his "progressive palm muting" idea helped clean up my sweeping a lot.
     
  4. Malkav

    Malkav Washing your dishes.

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    Adam Neely

    He's a bass player, but there are a lot of universally applicable videos regarding theory

     
  5. HumanFuseBen

    HumanFuseBen SS.org Regular

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    Aww shucks, thanks a lot you guys!!!
    Cracking the Code, that's my favorite!!! Anything Troy Grady does, i digest.
     
  6. AmoryB

    AmoryB Blackout!

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    David E. Farrell has a youtube channel that walks you through Tonal Harmony, which is the standard text for music theory majors. Also has musical examples in the videos.
     
  7. High Plains Drifter

    High Plains Drifter ... drifting...

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    I've always been quite impressed with Guthrie Govan's youtube stuff. Not sure if that's what you're looking for though.
     
  8. Zeus1907

    Zeus1907 SS.org Regular

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    Homestly, a teacher is going to be better than 97% of what you find on YouTube.
    You mentioned music 'ADD'; Which I'll assume means you watch one vid, play a lick them move on. Or if the lick isn't 'cool' enough you'll skip;
    Start with harmony. Chord Harmony.
    Because everything is based off that.

    Then learn the chords of the major scale.
    Then VERY LOOSELY, learn your basic arpeggio's, Maj, min, Maj7, min7, dim, and dim7.
    That should keep you occupied for a while.

    I say loosely because again, about 99% of YouTube videos do a horrible job of properly teaching arpeggio's.

    After you have chords, arms, and your modes. LEARN songs. That's the best way to see how some theory is applied in a real way.
    And don't be afraid of the easy stuff, 12 bar blues, 2-5-1 progressions, etc.
     
  9. Repner

    Repner SS.org Regular

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    I really like Fake Dr Levin's videos. He seems to cover pretty much everything you want to know, in a very easy to follow (and sometimes, amusing) way. Damn good player as well.
     
  10. phugoid

    phugoid SS.org Regular

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    Came here to mention Ben Levin. Lots of people share their knowledge, but he's the best I've seen at demonstrating a mindset for sparking creativity. My favorite moment so far is in his multi-part series about learning Giant Steps (a really tough jazz tune); he suggests internalizing a difficult tune by writing a "catchy" folk song over the same progression. Then he plays the song he wrote for Giant Steps, which is awesome. (song at 3:32)

    https://youtu.be/FCxAXbIfSmk?t=212

    I'm pretty good at mechanical practice - Ben is showing me how to go off the rails and explore.
     
  11. Malkav

    Malkav Washing your dishes.

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    I found Ben Levin's page because of an interview he did with Adam Neely, really dig his stuff as well, the Zelda Modes series was really amusing too :agreed:
     
  12. Jacksonluvr636

    Jacksonluvr636 SS.org Regular

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    Makes a lot of sense. I have been thinking about some real lessons.

    Thanks for all the video suggestions as well everyone.
     
  13. Mathemagician

    Mathemagician SS.org Regular

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    For individual songs/sections of songs the guy Chris Zoupa (spelling on last name?) makes super easy to follow videos. I always Google to see if he has one whenever I go to learn a somewhat popular song. Guy has hundreds of videos.
     

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