Which DAW for windows 10?

Discussion in 'Recording Studio' started by WhoThenNow7, Jul 10, 2016.

  1. WhoThenNow7

    WhoThenNow7 SS.org Regular

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    I'm currently using cubase le4 with Windows 7.. I've been using it for a couple years but am looking to upgrade to a better computer with a more powerful processor.. I can handle the computer part, but am lost on which DAW I should be using.. Cubase le4 is not compatible with Windows 10, so I'm wondering if I should just get the latest cubase, or if I should invest time in learning a different DAW. I am by no means a professional, so that's why I'm hoping to get some of you guy's opinions. Thanks!
     
  2. KingAenarion

    KingAenarion Resident Studio Nerd

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    Try the Demo of Presonus' Studio One from their website, and also try Reaper. If you don't like those, just go the latest version of Cubase,
     
  3. Handbanana

    Handbanana SS.org Regular

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    Gotta second Studio One V3. Performance is solid. Its super easy to use. And it has a free version to give it a go before you decide to take the plunge. People around here swear by Reaper if you're not looking to spend, and pretty much every other DAW has some sort of Demo/Trial version.
     
  4. Masoo2

    Masoo2 SS.org Regular

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    Studio One V3 looks really, REALLY solid. I gave the demo a shot and I loved it, but I'm not sure if I should consider it or just stick with Cubase because I'm used to it.

    I'd recommend you try out both the newest version of Cubase and Studio One.
     
  5. metal_sam14

    metal_sam14 Midget

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    Reaper is solid as a rock on my x64 Windows 10 system.
     
  6. GuitarBizarre

    GuitarBizarre Listen to physics.

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    If you don't want to spend money, your options are either Reaper or complete crap.

    If you want to drop the required amounts on new software, then the most recent version of Cubase will, like all the versions prior, be a fantastic DAW that will do anything you can ask of it.
     
  7. Aymara

    Aymara SS.org Regular

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    Reaper is not free! But it is the cheapest of the powerful DAWs and it's the DAW with the best community. That's why it is my DAW of choice ... cheap, powerful (both, DAW and community) and stable.
     
  8. coffeeflush

    coffeeflush Well-Known Member

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    Using FL studio 12 here with Win 10. Everything just werks
    (Yes come at me with the 'its a toy' DAW argument)

    Reaper still has few bugs to sort with the 64 bit version support with 10. It crashed with my 2i4 quiet a few times. But its better then lot of the other more expensive DAW's
     
  9. GuitarBizarre

    GuitarBizarre Listen to physics.

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    Honestly, you can say that as much as you want, but it's not going to change that the vast majority of users are simply going to wait the 5 seconds it takes to dismiss the nag screen and continue "evaluating".
     
  10. Aymara

    Aymara SS.org Regular

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    Yes, I was one of them, until I realized, that this anti-social behaviour will kill this mini-company called Cockos in the long run and so Reaper too.

    60 bucks for this awesome software is one game less I bought and it was absolutely worth it.

    So again: Reaper is not freeware.

    Piracy already killed music, so I hope more musicians at least wake up.
     
  11. GuitarBizarre

    GuitarBizarre Listen to physics.

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    I mean, piracy has absolutely not killed music. What was under threat was never music. It was a corporate structure of exploitation and wilful ignorance, brought on by the wrongheaded thinking of record industry executives who believed they owned what their artists created. (Quite literally, even - look up their attempt to have all recordings created under a contract declared "Works For Hire", or the cases that led to copyright law being extended from 50 to 70 years posthumously of the artist)

    That business model is still making money, but it will, forever, continue to shrink.

    And frankly, that change has been a long time coming - The Music Industry model adopted by the Big 4 record labels was always that to finance your enterprise, you would give small artists exorbitant advances on a contract, which they would then be expected to pay back through record sales.

    Your band doesn't sell well enough to pay that back? Too bad. Now you owe the label all the money they expected you to earn on that album, unless your band splits up to avoid the contract. (Or creatively renames itself, a la Limp Bizkit becoming limpbizkit).

    Even if your first album does sell well, the reaction of the industry at that point was typically to then offer you another advance and then pressure you to write an album in 6 months that's as good or better selling than the album you spent your whole life building up to, and the same applies - if you get a 100,000 advance to finance the rrecording of your album, you best hope that album sells a million, because you won't see any money for yourself until it makes that 100,000 back for the studio.

    Best part? The industry lived on chewing up young bands like this through these deals. They knew full well that their model ran as follows: You sign a bunch of artists, one of those artists goes supernova success story, and the money you earn on that offsets the loss you made on the smaller bands that didn't make it.

    Except the industry decided that wasn't good enough - they started treating the failed acts as if they owed a debt, and basically drove a ton of small acts out of the industry after their second album because the sales didn't pay the advances and the band could no longer afford to record.

    Look at Nine Inch Nails! Trent Reznor uploaded his own albums to torrent sites for years because he hated how the labels he'd gotten in bed with for multi album deals were ripping off his fans - Trent Reznor slams the majors

    At some points, even the artists themselves were in on this!

    Check out Jack White's releases on his own label using what he called "Triple Decker Vinyl". It's a 12" record, with a 7" record inside of it. Limited edition of 300 printed.

    Cool idea. Until you have to literally destroy your 12" record to get the 7" out of it.

    300 made? Convenient. Because Jack White knows a large number of people in his rabid hardcore following will buy 3 copies. Each. One to play, one to collect, and one to break open.

    Nice 300 copy limited edition. Shame only 100 people could ever get the full value out of it, and pay 3 times for the pleasure, right?




    Contrast all of that exploitative bull....e to the modern landscape - Artists are now essentially in control of their content again, if they choose to be.

    Presently, Bandcamp is a runaway success. Patreon supported artists are doing very well for themselves, artists soliciting personal donations or selling their music through various other services are also experiencing huge popularity. Niche acts like Professor Elemental and Dan Bull have huge audiences and constant dates, tours, merchandise, etc.

    While the monetary rewards for superstardom are reducing in scale, the monetary entry level is now lower than it's ever been for people to begin reaping some small reward for their efforts.

    Small artists are no longer reliant on the mass-marketing machinery of the music industry in order to reach sizeable and devoted core audiences. That .... has become an exercise in blandness as the record companies attempt to appeal to the widest possible audiences by releasing Nickelbland, Coldplay and Adele albums to saturate the musical landscape with the musical equivalents of magnolia wallpaper and unsweetened, watery porridge.


    I will take that every, single, day, over an industry that is so dramatically exploitative.

    Piracy did not kill anything that didn't deserve to die.

    And frankly, software piracy is no different. Look at Valve - They're a LITERALLY BILLION DOLLAR enterprise these days, in an industry where Piracy has been an everpresent problem since before the widespread availability of the internet! (Don't copy that floppy, anyone?).

    Where did Valve manage to find the capability to combat piracy?

    They didn't.

    What they did was they provided a service that was more convenient and easier to use than piracy itself was.

    People willingly give Valve their money, because their prices are reasonable, and their service is more convenient and better integrated with peoples usage habits, compared to the comparitive (though still extremely mild) difficulty of piracy.

    Does Steam stop piracy? Not in the slightest. It is simply a preferable option compared to piracy.

    And this is exactly why Reaper is so successful - Cubase has, forever now, been bundled with a USB dongle that is required to be able to use the software you paid for on your own machine. If you've ever been limited on USB connectivity you'll understand how amazingly convenient it feels to no longer have to rely on that. That alone is bringing customers Reaper's way that don't want to deal with Cubase's bull.... in that regard.

    Customers that are then converted by superior pricing for a similar quality product - as opposed to £400 with dongle for Cubase 8.5, you can get Reaper for much less and have less hassle getting it to work.

    Not only that, but Reaper's decision not to hobble their trial version, brings HUGE word-of-mouth returns, as evidenced in this thread, where their product has already been recommended several times without a second thought, by people who I am relatively certain, in the majority, have not paid for a license.



    Piracy is not the problem it is often made out to be. In fact, by NOT trying to fight it any more than is reasonably necessary, Reaper, Valve, NiN, Bandcamp, GoG, and thousands of other enterprises who've made their names and audiences appreciate their pro-consumer, often DRM-Free stances, have actually used that as a selling point and built businesses around doing the counterintuitive thing and simply allowing it to happen if it happens.

    As is often the case with these things, a pirated copy is not a lost sale - it is a marketing opportunity that can be translated into direct profit when someone elses wallet opens up as a result of it.
     
  12. KingAenarion

    KingAenarion Resident Studio Nerd

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    TL;DR

    Music + Capitalism is bad.

    Steam is good, therefore Reaper is good because it's good value and caters to people who don't want to pay for .....

    Pirating =/= lost sale, because the person would have pirated something else anyways.
     
  13. KingAenarion

    KingAenarion Resident Studio Nerd

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    It's not a toy. It's just neither helpful for good practice outside EDM and is tailored specifically for EDM.
     
  14. steelyad

    steelyad Hop Pole Studios

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    Reaper is what I use in my studio every day, I learnt on Cubase and it's fine but Reaper just does everything that Cubase, Logic, PT and Studio One do and is so customisable I can use it exactly how I want. Price doesn't even come into it for me. And as for stability? I've only ever had issues on cheap computers or interfaces with substandard ASIO driveres (Focusrite, i'm looking at you and your DICE2 drivers.....). I'm on RME now on a reliable Skylake Z170 build and I run some humongous projects, 64-100 channels of audio, 10+ guitars with VST amps, full orchestras in Kontakt, and such........ and crashes? Not one in a year.
     
  15. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    I would wonder if this is maybe an issue with the drivers for the 2i4? I've been using Reaper on Win 10 x64 or a good while now and had zero crashes or stability problems. Using a Tascam interface though, so maybe that's the difference.
     
  16. Fretless

    Fretless Knob Fiddler

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    I've been using bitwig since beta. I love it, but it's not for everyone.
     
  17. jerm

    jerm SS.org Regular

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    I used to use Cubase 5 however my computer was running pretty slow. Went to reaper and it ran my VSt's much more efficiently.

    I've now bought a new PC and run Reaper with tones of VSTs/Plugins and love it.

    Would love to try Studio One though...
     
  18. Chokey Chicken

    Chokey Chicken mouth breather

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    We use FL for our metal project, and I can confirm this. Its not nearly as intuitive as other daws at this sort of thing. There's a huge unnecessary learning curve if you're used to other daws, as FL handles things drastically differently from the other daws.

    That said, it can competantly do what the other daws do. Just not worth learning if its not what you were brought up on, while on the other hand people using FL can only benefit from learning other daws. We're in the process of learning reaper so that if we ever have to, we'll be more familiar with a more widely used daw.
     
  19. noUser01

    noUser01 Still can't play.

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    Reaper. Just as powerful as any other DAW, insanely customizable, dirt cheap, has a fantastic community, gets updated constantly, and that's just the beginning. I used Logic 9 and ProTools for years and dabbled in other DAWs here and there but Reaper is by far the best one I've used.
     
  20. Aymara

    Aymara SS.org Regular

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    And this experience gets confirmed here:

    REAPER In Shangri-La – Designing demon voices for Far Cry 4 – The REAPER Blog

    Ubisoft chose Reaper over Protools for Far Cry 4 for a good reason.

    In my opinion the only reason, why Reaper doesn't have the major success in pro studios so far is, that Cockos has no onsite support. But it seems more and more studios use it as a second DAW for compatibility reasons ... many newcomer bands use it for it's power and price combination.

    In my personal opinion Reaper is hard to beat for projects, that are mainly based on audio tracks. For pure MIDI projects DAWs like Ableton might be a better choice. I myself use it for both.
     

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