What's on your workbench?

Discussion in 'Luthiery, Modifications & Customizations' started by Walterson, Mar 5, 2013.

  1. migstopheles

    migstopheles SS.org Regular

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    Started my first ever guitar build. Using pine as it's just a practise guitar really, I have some ash and a walnut top at home ready for when I'm confident enough to build a "proper" guitar...

    Body is a PRS Vela clone, but with a 750mm scale length and my own headstock design (which still needs some finalising, that right hand side ain't quite right)
    Rough carved the body last night, waiting for a truss rod to arrive before I rout the neck.
     

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  2. NickS

    NickS Rocket Surgeon

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    Looks pretty good, though I hope that knot right in the centerline of the neck doesn't cause you problems when you go to route it. I like your stack of Festool equipment in the background too!
     
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  3. migstopheles

    migstopheles SS.org Regular

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    Urgh yeah that knot is actually a cluster of 4 knots right the way through, it's giving me nightmares just thinking about clearing that out :lol:

    The festool hoover belongs to the guy I share the space with, it's a great piece of equipment but holy shit has he paid a lot of money for it haha
     
  4. Soya

    Soya Poor person

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    Mmm Festool
     
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  5. ElRay

    ElRay Mostly Harmless

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    Is it a tight knot? Does it go all the way through?

    You can try saturating it with CA glue from both sides. And/or, you can squeegee a slow-set epoxy from both sides, before you shape the neck, then again, after you shape the neck and cut the slot for the truss rod.
     
  6. GraemeH

    GraemeH SS.org Regular

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    Eyy another Edinburgh builder :yesway:
    Yeah my first tester build was B&Q shit timber, so your pine build is luxury compared to that heh.
    Shape and proportions are looking good and I'm a scale-length whore (my current build is a 30") so this is my jam!
     
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  7. electriceye

    electriceye SS.org Regular

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    I would toss that neck. Besides the knot, which are typically brittle anyway, pine is just too soft for a neck. You can get a nice piece of maple for cheap anywhere. Do that instead.
     
  8. Taylor

    Taylor Formerly... someone

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    Some repairs on the neck of my old Jackson Rhoades. Apparently it had quite a fall off my workbench over the winter, but I don't ever remember knocking it off myself. Well not a super big deal I guess. Will be able to fix it up easily enough. Put a slight chamfer on the back of the headstock. Also stripped the poly finish off so I can refinish with Tru-Oil which is a superior neck finish feel-wise imo.

    0310211544.jpg 0310211547.jpg 0310211625.jpg



    Once I finish repairs and the refinish, and also once the paint I ordered gets here I'm going to try swirling it again.
     
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  9. migstopheles

    migstopheles SS.org Regular

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    Yeah the neck has been tossed. That cluster of knots turned into a disaster... before I even had a chance to work on it, the wood moved and the knots didn't, so the whole thing was pivoted around that point, rendered the whole thing useless. Well, even more useless :lol:

    I had a lump of maple sitting about from a furniture project, which incredibly was _just_ the perfect size to make a replacement, so I've glued wings onto the headstock ready for re-shaping tomorrow... fingers crossed
     
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  10. migstopheles

    migstopheles SS.org Regular

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    There are dozens of us! Dozens!
     
  11. Taylor

    Taylor Formerly... someone

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  12. Omzig

    Omzig SS.org Regular

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    I have one and it's sitting in a box wait to get sold...i think since i bought it about 8 years ago it's had about in all 2 hours run time max. it's Mega Heavy & i find it very difficult to handle because it's also very bulky, i was going to mount it somehow and use it for pin routing/surfacing but since i got the CNC it's just been sitting about under the desk. in this case id say bigger is not always better. shout if you want pic's of it side by side to compared to a plam router
     
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  13. Taylor

    Taylor Formerly... someone

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    See now I figured might as well get the beefier version, but if the thing is an anvil I'm definitely going to reconsider. Just took a look at the specs, and holy shit 6.4kg! I know they have a 2 1/4HP version that's a bit lighter. I'll try and find a display model at some of the woodworking supply stores close to me.
     
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  14. Omzig

    Omzig SS.org Regular

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    Yep id suggest you try and get some "Hands On" with one as it's a bit of a Monster! More suited to a bench or table mount system id say.
     
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  15. Taylor

    Taylor Formerly... someone

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    Managed to find a display model at my local shop. It was manageable but definitely had some heft. And it's 4lbs lighter than the 3 1/4 HP model. So it's a definite no on that one. Too bad my local shop has a 20% markup on all of their tools, so I won't be buying from them anytime soon.
     
  16. Randy

    Randy Tony Lazuto?! Super Moderator

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    Couple shop updates

    Put together this wood rack. Still needs some stuff to finish it off like a trough in the front so I can stack the lumber a few pieces deep, casters and some plywood down the middle to connect the "shelves"

    The main goal is to consolidate all my wood in one place and to make it rolling so I can move it an access both sides. Front is mostly for the tonewoods, back will be for plywood sheets, middle shelves for dimensional lumber like 2x4s

    Screenshot_20210411-100750.png

    Second project was this rolling tool cart. My old shop had a built in cabinet that I screwed pegboards to for my tools. It was actually kinda inconvenient since one door opened toward the wall and the tools on that side were hard to access.

    Goal with this one was to get my tools organized, also have it on wheels so that I could park it one place and move it when I need. Added perk of being able to roll it to whatever bench I'm workong on doesn't hurt.

    It's mostly 2x4s, and two 2'x4' sheets of pegboard. I've got two 2x4s in the middle running left to right, both are there for support but also to screw the magnetic bars to. Those were on sale at Harbor Freight this weekend for $2 a piece. Wheels are 2" poly urethane casters, also HF for ~$3.50 each.
    Screenshot_20210411-100709.png Screenshot_20210411-100705.png
     
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  17. Randy

    Randy Tony Lazuto?! Super Moderator

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    Other project du jour was this Proxxon mini mill. I've had them on my radar for a couple years but price was never right to justify it to tinker with. One recently popped on CL in basically new shape, which was enough opportunity for me to take the plunge.

    Screenshot_20210411-100839.png

    The plan was to modify it for CNC (of course :lol: ), the main interest was for light metal working. I'm less than impressed by how the Shapeoko handles aluminum and didn't see a small enough gantry system for me to want to go that route. The ridgid Z axis is the key here.

    Anyway, I did some tests manually on some scrap aluminum and was happy enough with the results I got to proceed.

    I used the popular "bubblegum CNC" conversion that's available on Thingiverse. Everything was printed in PLA w/ 55% cubic infill. Steppers are Nema 17 (medium torque) and 626 bearings on everything. The Proxxon lead screws have a weird diameter, so the couplings are 5mm to 4mm that I reamed out on one side to fit the shaft.

    Screenshot_20210411-101028.png

    Unpictured, for the electronics, it's using an Ardunio UNO + CNC Shield v3 and A4988 drivers. Power supply is a generic 12V 10A thing, which looks to be sufficent as the Nema 17s draw max 2A a piece. The Arduino is running GRBL 0.9 and I'm controlling it using UGS.

    I did test of a couple tool paths to try out bridge milling in wood.

    Screenshot_20210411-100956.png

    Screenshot_20210411-100934.png

    I was quite pleased with the results, so I decided to up things to aluminum.

    I broke a couple bits pretty quick, as the toolpaths were too aggressive for the harder material, especially all the corners. So I tweaked the toolpaths and got it to cut 'something' resembling a baseplate.

    Please excuse the gouges, like I said I broke a couple bits and only had one piece of stock cut to size so I just plowed through it. I also didn't have homing setup yet so whenever it error'd, I had to rezero it manually.

    Screenshot_20210411-101049.png

    I'm pretty happy with that for my first attempt. I broke my last 1/8" bit near the very end of this so I didn't get a chance to make another one.

    After this, I decided to put everything in a housing (unpictured) to make the machine easier to move around the shop. Unfortunately putting the Arduino in a box made it kinda cramped, so I didn't notice the negative lead supply to the CNC shield came loose, so the next time I turned the machine on it fried the stepper drivers. Ordered replacements, got them put in and now appears it fried the Arudino too, so waiting for another one of those to come in.

    Overall, it has it's pluses and minuses. I spent more time and $ on it than I'd have liked to, and the size is limiting to an extent. I can see why a lot of guys make the jump to an HF or Grizzly mill but the small footprint of this is hard to deny. It's like the size of a Keurig coffee maker, and light so you can stick it on the bench, make some cuts, vacuum it off and stick it back underneath.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2021
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  18. IGC

    IGC SS.org Regular

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    I'v actually had a full bran new set of A4988 drivers be completely faulty / overheat and fry. I made sure to properly set the current limit before use on my Wade extruder. Swapped it out with an A4988 from a different set and it worked great. The faulty A4988 also fried the voltage regulator chip on my Mega 2560, but suprisingly, somehow, I can still print with it all day long...

    Interesting - A4988's actually have a higher amperage rating than the driver chips on Stepoko, which drives NEMA23. So ATP, I didn't even need to buy the TB6600 drivers for my diy CNC router and could have saved 100 bucks in driver cash. I'm doing fine with the A4988 on Ramps/Mega 2560.
     
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  19. Randy

    Randy Tony Lazuto?! Super Moderator

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    Good to know.

    Yeah, I swapped the drivers and they all started moving an uneven number of steps despite being configured the same and having the amperages set the same. Then none of them would move, then one of them would move with everything else unplugged, then it went back to none of them working at stayed that way. Super fickle.
     
  20. IGC

    IGC SS.org Regular

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    Similar, I'v had issues with using the exact same Marlin firmware on one manufacturers Mega 2560 to another manufacturers version. Supposed to be the same...
     
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