DudeManBrother

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They’re all so comprehensive now that it really doesn’t matter which one you get; just make sure to really learn it. I use Reaper primarily, then Logic for certain sound design parts, and occasionally I’ll run stems through Harrison Mixbus. I could learn Logic better and be content with using it, but I love Reaper and can work fast in it, so that’s my go-to. If you’ve already got 3rd party plugins that you use then Reaper is a no brainer IMO. It is the least CPU intensive daw by far, and the download size is insignificant. The fact that it’s so feature laden and customizable in such a small download is baffling.
 

sakeido

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I tried it in 2007 but I didn't really know what I was doing so I didn't give it that much of a fair shot but it did seem confusing to me then. Maybe this will be different this time when I try it.
imo switching DAWs just gets harder and harder as time goes on. As much as I bitch about Cubase, I'm really fluent in it and can work very quickly.

Reaper is so different it feels like my workflow just comes to a screeching halt. I don't find it as intuitive and easy to pick up as
Ableton. I had the Lite version with my audio interface and I got a good deal on the Suite version, so I went with that.
which is bizarre choice, very non-traditional for a metal guitarist (as far as I can tell) but it's quick and easy to work in for composition. I don't think I'd want to do a mix and master in it but for actually slapping songs together it's great, and it has probably the best hardware controller options out there now if you want to get away from a mouse & keyboard. Hell you can get an Akai Force and ditch a PC altogether... that's basically Ableton, standalone, wrapped up in an amazing package. Stellar unit.
 

Dayn

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which is bizarre choice, very non-traditional for a metal guitarist (as far as I can tell) but it's quick and easy to work in for composition. I don't think I'd want to do a mix and master in it but for actually slapping songs together it's great, and it has probably the best hardware controller options out there now if you want to get away from a mouse & keyboard. Hell you can get an Akai Force and ditch a PC altogether... that's basically Ableton, standalone, wrapped up in an amazing package. Stellar unit.
Yeah I do a fair bit of electronic stuff too and I use a tonne of virtual instruments. But the overriding consideration was I could get the full version for very cheap, so that's all the thought I had behind that decision.
 

BMFan30

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Yeah I do a fair bit of electronic stuff too and I use a tonne of virtual instruments. But the overriding consideration was I could get the full version for very cheap, so that's all the thought I had behind that decision.
I have enough for sound design as well in my DAW now but I wanted something more for live recording to see if I would like the workflow better for metal.
 

BMFan30

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I’ll run stems through Harrison Mixbus.
This is purely for mixing? I've only read so little on it but have heard metal producers talking about it.

If you’ve already got 3rd party plugins that you use then Reaper is a no brainer IMO
Yep, the lightweight nature of it seems to attract me to Reaper. I have my own plugins already so hopefully this will help me ease into new DAW territory. People say a lot of good about Reaper but I haven't tried it since '07, I'm sure lots has changed since.
It is the least CPU intensive daw by far, and the download size is insignificant. The fact that it’s so feature laden and customizable in such a small download is baffling.
This is important too, I don't like the sluggishness my other DAW geared towards sound design brings so maybe something else might be better for me, who knows.
 

DudeManBrother

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This is purely for mixing? I've only read so little on it but have heard metal producers talking about it.


Yep, the lightweight nature of it seems to attract me to Reaper. I have my own plugins already so hopefully this will help me ease into new DAW territory. People say a lot of good about Reaper but I haven't tried it since '07, I'm sure lots has changed since.
This is important too, I don't like the sluggishness my other DAW geared towards sound design brings so maybe something else might be better for me, who knows.
Harrison can do mixing and tracking, but I find it clunky, and they only allow 3rd party VST. I mostly only download AU (Mac) so it’s really only useful to me for the console color, and it’s nice to work on the console format sometimes. Now that SSL had updated their Bus Comp and Channel Strip with the new 360 software, I’m far less likely to open Harrison anymore. It does sound pretty cool, but it’s not always worth the hassle.

Reaper definitely sounds right up your alley then. I love that there is only 1 track style that will accept any audio/video source. Arm the track and select the interface channel. It’s non destructive to audio files too, so you can cut up a track however you want, and just drag the beginning or end of the clip and all the track’s recorded audio will show back up. I find it very useful for editing snare miss hits and things like that. I’ll just cut out a good hit and move it over to the miss, then drag the file back across the cut portion of the good snare hit to have the original back in place.
 

drgamble

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imo switching DAWs just gets harder and harder as time goes on. As much as I bitch about Cubase, I'm really fluent in it and can work very quickly.

Reaper is so different it feels like my workflow just comes to a screeching halt. I don't find it as intuitive and easy to pick up as

which is bizarre choice, very non-traditional for a metal guitarist (as far as I can tell) but it's quick and easy to work in for composition. I don't think I'd want to do a mix and master in it but for actually slapping songs together it's great, and it has probably the best hardware controller options out there now if you want to get away from a mouse & keyboard. Hell you can get an Akai Force and ditch a PC altogether... that's basically Ableton, standalone, wrapped up in an amazing package. Stellar unit.

I have used Cubase(now Nuendo) and Pro Tools for so long that I just can't get into another DAW. They seem foreign to me and I usually don't want to futz around with learning a DAW while writing music. I went through the learning a DAW while trying to write music and mix for so long with Cubase that now I just know how to use it. I have set up macros for some things and I have gotten to a point that the DAW does not get in the way of my workflow. That being said, I have several friends that started off with Reaper and they feel the same way about Cubase. Reaper seems like a good pick if you are starting out and haven't used anything else. It is very cheap to maintain and will perform most of the functions needed. It does not have all of the functions of Nuendo. The MIDI functions alone are very mature and I find them easy to use and can get a project going fast. I have really tried to like Reaper, but I end up going back to Cubendo. I tried Pro Tools and I always get crashes, lose communication with MIDI controllers, and a whole host of other stuff that just brings me back to Cubendo.

At the end of the day, find what works for you. Any DAW does the same thing, there are just different ways to do most things. Once you get things figured out, it is very hard to switch and be productive at the same time. The bottom line is that the best DAW is the one you know how to use.
 

bostjan

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I use Studio One. I'm only a little proficient with it, but I tried Reaper and even after a week of playing with it, I still didn't feel comfortable navigating even basic edits. I only barely moved away from console recording back in 2015.
 

Screwhead

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I've been using Ableton since around 2006. Before that I used FruityLoops (before they called it FL Studio), and going back even further, I used to record guitar parts with a computer microphone by my amp using Windows Sound Recorder in Win 3.1 and bring them into Impulse Tracker. I also primarily made electronic music and DJ'd from around 2002 onward, so Ableton was a great tool. Extremely easy to make loops of melodies, drum loops, etc, and drag/rearange everything.
 

thebeesknees22

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cubase here after giving up on pro tools and logic. It's fine for me. Makes sense, and I like the logical editor a lot.

But I'm watching studio one videos now and the basic workflow stuff looks pretty cool tbh

I've been wanting to try ableton for non rock/metal stuff for a while, but I haven't got around to it yet.
 

Screwhead

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I've been wanting to try ableton for non rock/metal stuff for a while, but I haven't got around to it yet.

Ableton is amazing! I've tried almost everything out there, including Logic, and Ableton IMO has the best workflow, as well as the name implies, being able to be used as a live tool. Each channel has loops you can program (for VSTs/MIDI) or audio clips you can launch (drum loops, movie samples, instrument loops, one-shots, whatever).

It takes a little digging in, but it's absolutely incredible! Once I switched over to Ableton, I honestly don't think anything else will even come close for ease of use and the simplicity of being able to quickly throw together something and experiment live.
 

littlebadboy

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Samplitude Music Studio.

Why?
I started with Magix Music Maker. Had everything I need. It was so easy to use. Then, I graduated from it and went to its big brother- The Samplitude Music Studio. Cheap, lots of freebies. Has everything I need.
 

Voodoo Marshall

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GB and Logic but honestly, GB more than anything just b/c I know it. With Neural DSP plugins, good mics for vox and drum plugins, in addition to the GB onboard stuff, I can get it sounding good and as someone above said, I'm fluent in it. If I'm serious about something, I'll take the GB to Logic Pro and then send the file to my "real" producer friend to work it in Pro Tools. PT is soooo far above my pay grade.
 

BMFan30

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So far what I've gathered is that:
1. Reaper is very affordable, fast, lightweight, customizable, stripped down for simplicity but I may end up searching for ways on how to do things more than making actual music since it's very vanilla and needs scripts to do things to be set up how you want it.

2. Studio One isn't too expensive, user friendly, feature rich, has a great looking UI but still lacks ways to do certain things.

3. Cubase is stupid expensive but is very intuitive, good workflow but is a bit bloated but has been tried and tested longer than most DAWs.

Am I right for assuming some of this based on stuff I've been reading lately? I'm still going to try a few of them to see which workflow suits me best or if I just need to stay in my DAW now because I know it best. Shopping for DAW features has me thinking maybe I need something else for recording metal easier. Maybe I'm wrong, don't know yet.
 

nickgray

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since it's very vanilla and needs scripts

3rd party scripts are easy to find, and there's an internal package manager (ReaPack), so you can easily download them. By and large they just pop up in your actions list, and that's it really. There's no difficulty to it of any kind.

That said, Reaper doesn't "need" user scripts. It has a monstrous amount of features available. It's vanilla in the sense that when you start up the new install, the default UI/UX is barebones.

but I may end up searching for ways on how to do things more than making actual music

But that's the problem of every DAW - you first have to learn how to use them. It's the same with Reaper. It's just that the initial configuration that it comes with is more spartan.
 

BMFan30

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3rd party scripts are easy to find, and there's an internal package manager (ReaPack), so you can easily download them. By and large they just pop up in your actions list, and that's it really. There's no difficulty to it of any kind.
I got the ReaPack today along with some skins. Everything is still very confusing to me because it's a new DAW but I kind of got a couple of tracks going in my projects.

I fucked it up heavily but I got 2 midi tracks going but I kept messing it up because I was accidentally zooming and sliding the midi clips in ways I didn't want to nor understand how I was messing it up. That's not Reapers fault of course, I'm just too new to it.

That said, Reaper doesn't "need" user scripts. It has a monstrous amount of features available. It's vanilla in the sense that when you start up the new install, the default UI/UX is barebones.
Yeah sorry, that's exactly what I meant. Not that it lacks features, it's just not bloated which is why it's lightning fast. It's vanilla in a good way with less clutter.

But that's the problem of every DAW - you first have to learn how to use them. It's the same with Reaper. It's just that the initial configuration that it comes with is more spartan.
You're right, it is! When I was searching through Reaper info, it just seemed like you have to look for more tutorials because it was more confusing to some is the way some people came across to me when describing their Reaper experience.

You do have to take months to years of searching like that to really get to grips and become proficient in it, I understand that. I do have crossover knowledge from other DAWs so hopefully I won't have to search too long.
 

Krazy Kalle

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Just get cakewalk by bandlab. It's free, constantly updated and awesome. full featured, intuitive and cosmetically customizable. Even if you decide to go with another DAW, there's no reason not to install it. I'm surprised I don't see it brought up more often... This program used to be called Sonar platinum and used to cost 500 bucks haha

Same for me. Before I started recording, I searched "best free DAWs" and I read Cakewalk multiple times, tried it out and it worked pretty well. I still have some problems with it (like audio engine stutters when one track is on record, rarely shuts down when dealing with Spitfire Audio LABS and I have like half a second latency), but it was okay for recording some demos. I'm going to get a Focusrite Scarlett, which comes with Ableton Live Lite, then I'll test that DAW and one day when I have the money for a MAC, maybe I'm going to buy Logic Pro.
 


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