The words we use to describe tone

Discussion in 'General Music Discussion' started by narad, Jul 11, 2021.

  1. Pietjepieter

    Pietjepieter SS.org Regular

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  2. TheInvisibleHand

    TheInvisibleHand SS.org Regular

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  3. Bodes

    Bodes SS.org Regular

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    Fender-like cleans. Although I am sure people could use some of the words in your extensive list to describe it in more detail.
     
  4. Xaeldaren

    Xaeldaren SS.org Regular

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    Crystalline is something I've come across for sparkling, hi-fi clean tones.
     
  5. Splenetic

    Splenetic SS.org Regular

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    Cavernous

    ....for the reverb side of things.
     
  6. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    If we're including bass terms - Hi-fi and "mwah" for that fretless thing.
     
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  7. BenjaminW

    BenjaminW SS.org Regular

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    Trash
     
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  8. Abominorg the Grotesque

    Abominorg the Grotesque SS.org Regular

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    I've told people "yeah man I like them Boss Metal Zones, they've got the Hate Tone"
     
  9. Hollowway

    Hollowway Extended Ranger

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    I have nothing to add here, other than to say I hope you project will put an end to this, and we can all use objective criteria from this day forth.
     
  10. TheBolivianSniper

    TheBolivianSniper SS.org Regular

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    please give definite meanings to all these so we can hopefully have a list when manufacturers come out with their buzzwords and we can agree they're making shit up
     
  11. vilk

    vilk Very Regular

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  12. spudmunkey

    spudmunkey SS.org Regular

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    I've heard someone describe a pickup as "effortless". No clue what they could have meant.

    Others I've heard:
    "Sounds passed off"
    "Ballsy"

    Some day I plan on building a baritone, and when the time comes, I'll want pickups to sound "jangly"...but not sure how to communicate the tone I have in my head. Something like the guitar in the intro to the acoustic GNR Lies version of "You're Crazy"...
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2021
  13. Hollowway

    Hollowway Extended Ranger

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    Yeah, there's this quote on the Fryette users forum, where one of the support guys answers the question about the difference in sound between the Deliverance 60 and 120 by saying, "The D60 sounds pissed off, but the D120 sounds like a freight train coming down the street." Consequently, I still don't know the tonal difference between the two.

    Whenever people do these similes and metaphors I feel like I should have spent more attention in the poetry portion of English. I think in the future I'm going to make up my own terms, like the way paint colors are. Wanna know how an Aftermath neck pickups sounds? It's like a child on a merry-go-round on a warm summer's afternoon.
     
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  14. Lorcan Ward

    Lorcan Ward 7slinger

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    So medium hot, unpleasant to the ears of anyone listening but the owner loves it regardless because its their's. That sounds like an aftermath to me.
     
  15. Hollowway

    Hollowway Extended Ranger

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    :lol:
     
  16. Sermo Lupi

    Sermo Lupi SS.org Regular

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    Hah, as someone who works on a lexicographical research project, you'll have at least one bystander who'll get a kick out of this.

    Depending on what your aims and constraints are, one problem might be that the vocabulary of tone is substantially that of other genera in combination: not just that of music instrumentation but also of the culinary arts, medicine, poetry--the combinations are almost endless.

    I noticed tone vocabulary changed a bit with guys like Nolly, Misha and Tosin. Before them, it didn't seem as common to talk about things like overtones, summed frequencies, or cascading harmonics--basically descriptors about layering tones as opposed to the fundamental sounds themselves. At its core, "djent" was a memed descriptor encapsulating the same idea.

    There are definitely cliches you see over and over that might be termed a true tonal lexicon (we all know that famous scene from Spinal Tap, and it could've been updated several times over by now). However, I think part of the ingenuity of the tonal lexicon is the need for gear manufacturers to devise new ways of selling broadly similar products year after year, as well as their signature artists exercising their sales skills in describing something old as being essentially new. This seems to be why loan words are so frequent in this area--the rate at which they are acquired is artificial, largely coinciding with new annual product releases.

    I could give many examples of this process in action. For example, it doesn't surprise me that Sterling Ball and John Petrucci incorporated more meat metaphors into their sales pitches after they got into grilling and smoking as a hobby. And whereas it may or may not suit a tone to call it "sinewy", "meaty" or "chewy", it helps when the guitar producing it is painted in "brown sugar" with a "roasted maple neck".

    I expect your list of words could be expanded by hundreds more if you (or a group) really sat down and put serious thought into it.

    Knowing you, I expect something neat will come of this. For now, it seems a bit of an odd way to spend your evenings! Any hints where this is going, or is it hush hush until you're finished?
     
  17. diagrammatiks

    diagrammatiks SS.org Regular

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    show me where the aftermath hurt you
     
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  18. Anon E. Moose

    Anon E. Moose SS.org Regular

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    Skronk is a fairly old term referring to brash, loud, and discordant jazz saxophone. John Zorn employs skronk a lot.
     
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  19. xzyryabx

    xzyryabx SS.org Regular

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    Next, start doing other languages, and regret the day you ever picked up an instrument or learned to code.
     
  20. ShredmasterD

    ShredmasterD Calls it like it is.

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    Jimi Hendrix once said in an interveiw " Jelly Bread" to describe his sound on a track
     
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