The "Find out what your guitar style is" thread

Discussion in 'Music Theory, Lessons & Techniques' started by JP Universe, Aug 12, 2011.

  1. HyperShade

    HyperShade Well-Known Member

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    Omar Rodriguez-Lopez: Really got me into more out there music. He has a sporadic approach I wish I could achieve myself.

    Mikael Akerfeldt: Made me actually give a shit about learning classical guitar when I was in college. Amazing riffs and song structures.

    Paul Gilbert: I learned so many licks from Gilbert instructional videos and he showed me the way of modes. I'm all about string skipping as well, which he is a master at.

    Frank Zappa: I will always think Frank was the greatest composer ever. He was constantly pushing the limit of what he and his band could do. And he always changed it up live.

    Devin Townsend: He showed me that Jedi's are real and you can master the force through guitar.
     
  2. Bluestreak

    Bluestreak Member

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    Carlos Cavazo: My cousin Vincent gave me my first heavy metal album in 1983, and it happened to be Quiet Riot: Metal Health. I started watching MTV (back when they actually played music videos!) and I saw some early QR music vids. Watching Carlos solo, watching the band play... they were my first inspiration to play music. My grandmother gave me a Sears guitar (white w/black stripes a la Eddie Van Halen's red w/white stripes)... but my dad wouldn't let me have an amp. Again, my cousin Vince to the rescue - he gave me a tiny, acoustic Fender guitar amp. I've played guitar ever since, because of Carlos, QR, and my cousin.

    Steven Siro Vai: What more can be said of Mr. Vai? I've attended his clinics, been to his concert meet-and-greets, seen him play live at least a dozen times, and I've found nothing but inspiration from his words, from the passion in his music, and the outstanding technique I think every person who ever touches a guitar aspires to.

    Paul Gilbert: I got into Paul in his post-Racer X years, specifically when Mr. Big put out their second album (Lean Into It). I've been a fan every since, with Spaceship One being my favorite PG work. He went from a blazing, heartless fretboard scorcher in Racer X to emitting tasty licks that bespoke of his dozens of great influences, rather than just masturbating a guitar neck to its limit. I had the good fortune of meeting Mr. Gilbert in the early 1990's (my band opened for Mr. Big in 1992 at a small club in Melbourne, FL), a time when he had matured from a speed demon into a melodic master in just a few short years' time. My favorite song of all-time to cover is Green Tinted Sixties Mind.

    Bruck Kulick: Bruce first came to light for me with Kiss, but I've been a fan ever since. Union also did some great work. It was his sound that got me. His ability to stand out despite being consumed, if not drowned out, by the sound of Kiss, Paul Stanley, and Gene Simmons. His ability to transcend and technically out-play the legend (Ace Frehley) who preceded him was something that drew me to him as well, though it's only in the last ten years I've come to realize that.

    Vito Bratta (White Lion): I can't help it, I grew up and learned to play guitar in the "hair spray" era. Vito's tasty sound, his fluidity, and his melodic virtues are something I've always aspired to include in my playing.

    Though I am technically proficient and a solid guitarist, I will always fall woefully short of my heroes.

    Honorable mentions go to John Petrucci, Joe Satriani, George Lynch and Dave Mustaine. I would not be the player I am today without those guys.

    -R
     
  3. Valennic

    Valennic Many Fingers

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    Michael Amott: It was Michael that got me into the intense melodic death metal riffing that would occupy two years of my guitar career, and theres no denying it was one hell of a influence on riffing. It still pulls through more dominantly than anything else I do, plus I hear melodies everywhere now :lol:

    John Petrucci: My SENSE of melody came a lot from this guy. I've always loved what he did melodically, and much of how I approach a seven string came from his work with Dream Theater.

    Muhammed Suicmez (I can't spell his fucking name >_>): Definitely gave me the drive to improve my clarity and focus less on just straight power chords when riffing. This is probably the most predominant part of my style now, I tend to rely on mostly single note riffs because of the time I spent playing Necrophagist songs.

    Tosin Abasi: This is definitely a lesser influence, but the chord voicings he uses and the approach to the instrument he has definitely made me rethink a few things, and look more into the beautiful side of an ERG.

    Oli Herbert: He may use a lot of powerchords in his riffing but theres a lot going on around them. I picked up a lot of songwriting things from playing All that Remains stuff, and improved my technical skills due to Oli's ridiculous technical feats. (I also wish he'd release a solo album :( )
     
  4. SirMyghin

    SirMyghin The Dirt Guy Contributor

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    ITT: More metal than a foundry :cool:
     
  5. Enselmis

    Enselmis SS.org Regular

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    Marco Sfogli because he has the most fantastic tone I have ever heard.

    John Petrucci because he's cliched.

    Devin Townsend is just ridiculous in every way.

    Al DiMeola can shred like nobody else, and he started doing it before Van Halen!

    Oscar Peterson even though he isn't a guitar player. He defines jazz for me.
     
  6. fantom

    fantom Misses his 6 strings

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    While I tend to read more than post... I have to fill in some gaps here...

    Currently influenced by...
    1) Per Nilsson: Awesome everything... you can really tell he puts thought into everything he plays.
    2) Carl August Tidemann: Despite the annoyance of his current singer, he amazes me with his overall tone, note choices, harmonization, and feel... and his speed doesn't hurt.
    3) Johan Reinholdz: This guy made me love odd time signatures. He writes some solid music too.
    4) Mark Jansen: A huge fan of his song-writing since the first After Forever album. Mayan kind of disappointed me though :(
    5) Stefan Weinerhall: Mainly for his compositions and melodies. I've been following him since Mithotyn.

    And I have to mention Christofer Johnsson even though I'm breaking the 5 limit already.

    And why is Tony MacAlpine missing from here? He's a great musician with an ability to play/compose many different styles. He's got amazing technique too (on guitar and synth).
     
  7. ghostred7

    ghostred7 Banned

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    In no particular order or anything I could come close to playing, but....

    1. Al DiMeola - my acoustic influenced by him greatly. passion in all aspects of his song writing.

    2. Yngwie - Vibrato, Speed

    3. Criss Oliva - One of the most underrated guitar players in Metal history. He had melody, phrasing, control, songwriting abilities, and tone. This is my biggest tone influence (even if i STILL can't get my amp completely right).

    4. Andy LaRoque - Riffs

    5. John Petrucci - Technique, style, songwriting
     
  8. clockworksam

    clockworksam Atmosphere Geek

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    In no particular order -

    Graham "Pin" Pinney - SikTh
    I remember listening to Pins avant garde stlye of writing and technique and being utterlymindblown, A huge influence in melding Atonality with melody and working on as pristine a technique I can :D

    Steve Vai - 777 and Various
    Reading the "Little Black Dots" for the first time opened my eyes (and ears) to the concept of being an individual player with my own style and influence, this honestly pushed me forward to seek out a "sound" of my own. I also loved the idea of playing the guitar like it isnt just a guitar, but an INSTRUMENT.

    Gurneet Aluwhalia - Viatrophy
    UK band that recently split up much to my dismay. G had a partiular way of melding darkness and serenity into single (almost cryptic) passages of songs. middle eastern harmonic minor stuff that literally sounded like being in a tomb, I loved this style of ambience and atmosphere, so much so that I became obsessed with the idea of creating otherworldy ambiences with parts. for those of you who avent listened to this band check out - The Ethereal Darkness, on youtube and you will get my dift.

    Alex Bailey - Sylosis
    Josh Middleton of Sylosis may steal the show with most of his incredible solo sections and songwriting ability, but Rhythm player Alex was the biggest suprise, on seeing videos of his own solo ideas, his technique was impecible and his ideas imaginative, often complex and well suited, alot of the side project stuff he has done has a real sense of humour, captured really well by the fact it is technically advanced and well written.

    John Petrucci - Dream Theater
    Melodies. Eveyone can dig the mans incredible technique, and the rock discipline exercises are incredible, but I loved the amount of meoldy in alot of the early solos, the blistering blow your head off speed of some of the newer leads is impressive, but nothing will ever hit me as hard as pretty much every solo on the earlier albums.


    This was a great way to really think hard about my influences! Thanks JP universe!


    I forgot devin townsend! but were alking about human musicians right?
     
  9. IAMTHESQUALL

    IAMTHESQUALL Member

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    Marc Okubo: Unique riffing style, crazy breakdown patterns, songwriting/structure, and his really unique choice of chords.

    Frederik Thordendal: He uses some crazy time signatures... obviously.

    JP Brubaker: Very unique riffing style again, and I also appreciate how he focuses on writing amazing melodies for his solos rather than just trying to make them really crazy and hard to play.

    Tosin Abasi: He's a god. I rest my case.

    Lee Mckinney: Once again, I really admire his tendency to focus on the quality of leads rather than trying to make them as hard to play as possible. Although a Higher Place got a bad rap, it's a masterpiece in my book.
     
  10. Tranquilliser

    Tranquilliser SS.org Regular

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    1. Kris Norris (ex-Darkest Hour) without a doubt. He is probably my favourite guitarist ever. His solos are extraordinary, and so emotional, especially with the context of his era of Darkest Hour music. Just a fucking legendary player imo, and super underrated.

    2. Paul Gilbert - his use of alternate picking in everything made me want to learn how to play guitar.

    3. John Petrucci's playing made me inspired to play lead, and play fast, and clean.

    4. Dino Cazares' fucking insane picking made me learn the nuances that can come from syncopation in your riffs, and the joys of tuning below E standard.

    5. Per Nilsson's epicly clean technique. Inspires me to play cleanly and how to use arpeggios and string skipping in a more technical fashion, and integrate this into genres other than Metal.
     
  11. Ckackley

    Ckackley SS.org Regular

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    1. Stevie Ray Vaughn- His influence ? I'd never would have picked up a guitar in the first place if not for this guy.

    2. James Hetfield- Rhythm chops, rhythm chops, holy shit rhythm..

    3. Slash- He doesn't shred, his chords can be sloppy but when he plays a lead there's some of the BEST note choices ever.

    4. Zakk Wylde- Most people hate him. *shrug* His riffs have a cool groove and his songwriting (at least from a music standpoint, his lyrics are kinda meh) is stellar.

    5. Jeff Loomis- Shred with taste..

    As you can tell I'm not much for really "shreddy" guitar players. Give me half as many notes and make 'em count.
     
  12. skeels

    skeels ..to pay the beels

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    Buckethead said " Sometimes it takes a million notes to get one sound."

    Jimi Hendrix for inventing rock guitar.

    Slayer's Reign in Blood. As they got better, their lead work suffered. Does that make sense?

    Alex Lifeson. Creative and wiry - tone wise.

    Tony Iommi for bringing us the flat five.
     
  13. SirMyghin

    SirMyghin The Dirt Guy Contributor

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    [​IMG]
     
  14. Dayn

    Dayn silly person

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    I reckon. Everyone knows it was Jimmy Page that invented rock guitar.
     
  15. celticelk

    celticelk Enflamed with prayer

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    FTFY.
     
  16. skeels

    skeels ..to pay the beels

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    Hm. Controversy! Yeah, Page was good- was gonna put him on there. Compositionally fantastic. But Jim-i took it up a notch. The screaming on EXP for instance. He was the Thurston Moore of that era. Page was high horsepower, full-on sexy blues rock but Hendrix brought the noise.
    And yeah Iommi didn't BRING us the five perse - come to think of it Paganini was a good guitar player, too- but alright, he brought us Ozzy. We love you Ozzy!

    "Muddy Waters invented e-lectricity!"
     
  17. SirMyghin

    SirMyghin The Dirt Guy Contributor

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    I would say Rock Guitar predates Jimi, and even to a slight extent Clapton, west coast surf was there, which could rock a fair deal even if the lyrical content is slop. Guys like Berry probably did a lot to bring around what was happening in the 60s as it was, sure he didn't play distorted but that is irrelevant. Then we had Link Wray and his instrumental 'Rumble' in 1958, power chords, wang bar, distortion and feedback. If that isn't a big piece of modern rock guitar, what is?

    But I mean even in the 60s you had Clapton, Duane Alman, and Jimi all around at the same time, doing a lot of very similar things. Jimi had the feedback control which set him aside a little, but you can hardly give one man all the credit.
     
  18. skeels

    skeels ..to pay the beels

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    We guitar players are such a serious lot! Of course I do not credit 1 man for inventing an entire jonra of music. But for me and this seems to be the purpose of this thread jimi did pioneer the noise revolution. Of course bands like the Who and blue cheer did push the limits of sheer volume. And other players did make great advances in psychedelic tones, but to me rock is all about pushing the boundaries and conceptions of established norms. What rock was no longer pushes or tests these limits. Tony Iommi would be considered retro now. But when Sabbath started they were eeee-vile!
     
  19. SirMyghin

    SirMyghin The Dirt Guy Contributor

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    ^^ I stopped reading your post at "jonra"

    G-E-N-R-E

    In all seriousness though, you are still taking far too narrow a view. I would not agree Jimi had more influence than some of the other guitarists you are pushing. For one big reason, he didn't do much to expound on musical form itself, he just pushed the envelope soloing (and as I said, other guys were already doing that, in many of the same ways).
     
  20. skeels

    skeels ..to pay the beels

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    ^yeah my voice recognition software sucks. I was told I could only pick five. Did I miss something? Did I pick wrong?

    Forgive me for trying to be funny. Historically all "rock" music just becomes "popular" music on its jouney to become " oldies".
     

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