Staying in a mode ?

Discussion in 'Music Theory, Lessons & Techniques' started by coregod, Jul 21, 2021 at 8:19 PM.

  1. coregod

    coregod SS.org Regular

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Tuesday
    Hello I’m currently trying to write a song in d minor but not sure if I’m staying in the same mode or if I’m changing it. I’m making riffs with all the notes in d minor but sometimes I’m not hitting d in every riff, does that mean i changed the mode? Should I throw some d notes in every riff to stay in the same mode? I’m playing drop d and have lots of chugging in between so will that keep me in d? Thanks guys
     
  2. gnoll

    gnoll SS.org Regular

    Messages:
    1,430
    Likes Received:
    849
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2015
    Location:
    Europe
    Why does it have to be in d minor?
     
    coregod likes this.
  3. coregod

    coregod SS.org Regular

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Tuesday
    I don’t know music theory. is it okay if I stray away from d minor in a song that’s mostly in d minor ? I use a lot of open strings/chugs and what not, I’m tuned to drop d so it’s easier for me to write metal songs starting in d minor/ harmonic minor etc. I want to add vocals eventually so I just want to know what everything I’m writing is in so I don’t run into any issues. am I over complicating ? I know I might not make any sense. Does the song I’m writing have issues? Thanks for your response
     
  4. gnoll

    gnoll SS.org Regular

    Messages:
    1,430
    Likes Received:
    849
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2015
    Location:
    Europe
    I wouldn't worry about it and instead just write what sounds good. Music theory doesn't dictate what you're allowed to do. If you're hellbent on staying in d minor that might even make your song worse since it can get boring sticking to one key.

    If you want to know what key your music is in, I would think it's better to write the music first without restrictions, and then look at it once it's done and figure out what key it's in. Sometimes music doesn't even really have a key, and still sounds good. Sometimes music could be seen as having different keys depending on your perspective. And sometimes (quite often) music changes key somewhere in the song. Key changes can be a great addition to a song.
     
    wheresthefbomb and coregod like this.
  5. coregod

    coregod SS.org Regular

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Tuesday
    Thanks man ya I just needed someone to tell me again to just play what sounds good lol...my brother has told me that before a lot. I guess I just wanted to make sure I’m not just playing a bunch of random shit that’s going to hurt a musically trained persons ears before I put more time into my songs. Thanks bro
     
  6. Hollowway

    Hollowway Extended Ranger

    Messages:
    14,885
    Likes Received:
    8,580
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2008
    Location:
    California
    Do try to learn some theory. Not because it’ll make your material sound better, but you’ll be able to get to cool sounding songs/riffs way faster by understanding theory.
     
    coregod likes this.
  7. coregod

    coregod SS.org Regular

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Tuesday
    Ya
    For sure bro definitely need theory. I have some ideas based on riffs I’ve been playing with for a few years but will definitely need theory if I wanna keep writing. trying to learn everyday now.
     

Share This Page