Solo tones on bridge pickup?

Discussion in 'Beginners/FAQ' started by Mvotre, Mar 30, 2021.

  1. Mvotre

    Mvotre SS.org Regular

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    Not sure if this is the best section of the forum, but whatever...

    I really like the articulation and clarity of the bridge pickup, but I might use some tips for a great soloing tone. I'm thinking in the likes of Greg Howe:



    Or Max Ostro (here he change pickups, but the majority of the tune is just the bridge humbucker)


    Any tips on how to achieve this kind of tone? EQ before amp? Distortion pedal in a clean amp? Low output pickup? I found that a very subtle delay can tame a bit of the harshness from the bridge humbucker, but I still can't get that smooth tone from my bridge humbucker...
     
  2. USMarine75

    USMarine75 The man who is tired of the anus is tired of life Contributor

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    Greg used modded Fender Showmans (made more Marshall like) or Cornfords for years with a TS in front. He rarely uses the neck pickup so his EQ is set to the bridge pickup. (As opposed to setting to neck which will make the bridge bright/shrill.)
     
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  3. Lopp

    Lopp SS.org Regular

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    Love me some Greg Howe, especially his first album. Never heard of Max Ostro. Good stuff. Thanks for sharing.

    Regarding tone, this might be a cliché answer, but so much of both of their tone is purely in their fingers: the picking, the fretting, the slurs, hammering, tapping, bending, etc.

    On the amp side, they have their tones dialed in for soloing, not typical rhythm guitar playing. This allows them to use more mids. For example, they are hardly playing typical rhythm chords in those vids. They are riffing and soloing, so they do not use a typical mid-cut rhythm tone. Instead, they use boosted mids, which sound great for their purposes of riffing.

    At least I have found this for gigging, as I like a solo tone with more mids, but a rhythm tone with more scoop. The challenge I had was only wanting to use one tone for both, as I hated having to use a pedalboard, so I had to figure out a compromise. The tone was good enough for both, but still a compromise. I know I would dial them in differently if I used different tones for lead and rhythm.
     
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