So three guitarists...

endmysuffering

I'm serious
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If you can find a bassist who's passionate about playing bass, and knows how to do more than just follow the guitarist, they'll add something to the music even in low tunings.

Of course, the lowest I ever tune is Drop A, which at this point, some might say "Pfft... that ain't that low..."

As drop e 8 string main, there's no such thing as too low for me now.
 

axxessdenied

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As long as you find people who get along with each other and can contribute something musically, more power to you.

My problem has always boiled down to people not getting along with each other. Even when it seems to be a slam dunk - A) a guy who really likes the music we play and wants to add an extra guitar line that's not too complicated, but the guy ends up turning into a complete douche every time he talks to the drummer (for no apparent reason), so out he goes. B) a lifelong friend of the drummer who can add some nice smokin' leads, and seems like a really great dude, until he misses three practices and responds by being a douche to the same drummer, so out he goes. C) a guy who says he can play keyboards and wants to "fill in the sound a little" during solos and whatnot, and ends up coming to his first gig with the band without bringing his keyboard, instead bringing a flute, which doesn't fit the music at all, and, most importantly, was never rehearsed with the band, so, awkwardly in the middle of a gig, out he goes. D) a guy who wants to lay down some rhythm guitar, seems to know how to play and seems to know how get along with everybody, but, unfortunately, and oddly, does not know how to tune his guitar, so he has one of the other guitarists tune his guitar for him, until, time for a show and suddenly the other guitarist inexplicably doesn't want to tune his guitar for him, and before the primary guitarist can step in to save the day, the other two guitarists are swinging fists, so ... out he goes. E) new guy expresses interest, has limited experience in a band, but knows everybody in the band and gets on well with everybody, shows oodles of improvement at rehearsal and thickens up the sound of the band, then, at first gig with the band, activates built-in drum machine on keyboard and pisses of drummer - apologizes, but does it again at second gig, multiple times, and ... out he goes.

Can you tell that I've never had luck with the third guitar player/keyboard player new guy strategy? Something about having fun relaxing, playing music together, that seems to bring out the worst in some people. Often times the new guy is not the problem, but somehow gets one of the established band members to turn into a butthead, and then the band leader is in the awkward position of either firing non-necessary nice guy new guy or necessary asshole old guy from the band. In my experience, that usually ends up with the entire band calling it a day.

So, TL;DR - I'm always very skeptical of adding a "new guy," especially if his instrument is redundant. YMMV.

The answer is session musicians.
 

hairychris

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A Tool-esque/proggy band from London do the 3-guitar thing very well:

https://sumer.bandcamp.com/

It really adds to their live shows, as they do a lot of textures. Plus they all use very different kit so when they do the heavy riffs they're very heavy indeed.

It also helps that they're all very good musicians, though.
 

RHEX-7

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been a couple months since we picked up a third. its actually turning out pretty good. all of us are on the same page and are harmonizing and alienating alot of the leads. im rather glad to of picked up a third guy.
 

rockskate4x

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i saw whitechapel live, and it made an enormous difference being able to keep two rhythm guitars while a leads were being played.

As long as you can keep the live mix tight, it's beneficial to have guitars that play more of the material that you would typically have to cut from recorded versions of songs to play live.
 

DevinShidaker

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my band had 3 guitarists many years ago and it was completely unnecessary. That being said we don't have many harmonized leads.
 

scottro202

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As long as you find people who get along with each other and can contribute something musically, more power to you.

My problem has always boiled down to people not getting along with each other. Even when it seems to be a slam dunk - A) a guy who really likes the music we play and wants to add an extra guitar line that's not too complicated, but the guy ends up turning into a complete douche every time he talks to the drummer (for no apparent reason), so out he goes. B) a lifelong friend of the drummer who can add some nice smokin' leads, and seems like a really great dude, until he misses three practices and responds by being a douche to the same drummer, so out he goes. C) a guy who says he can play keyboards and wants to "fill in the sound a little" during solos and whatnot, and ends up coming to his first gig with the band without bringing his keyboard, instead bringing a flute, which doesn't fit the music at all, and, most importantly, was never rehearsed with the band, so, awkwardly in the middle of a gig, out he goes. D) a guy who wants to lay down some rhythm guitar, seems to know how to play and seems to know how get along with everybody, but, unfortunately, and oddly, does not know how to tune his guitar, so he has one of the other guitarists tune his guitar for him, until, time for a show and suddenly the other guitarist inexplicably doesn't want to tune his guitar for him, and before the primary guitarist can step in to save the day, the other two guitarists are swinging fists, so ... out he goes. E) new guy expresses interest, has limited experience in a band, but knows everybody in the band and gets on well with everybody, shows oodles of improvement at rehearsal and thickens up the sound of the band, then, at first gig with the band, activates built-in drum machine on keyboard and pisses of drummer - apologizes, but does it again at second gig, multiple times, and ... out he goes.

Can you tell that I've never had luck with the third guitar player/keyboard player new guy strategy? Something about having fun relaxing, playing music together, that seems to bring out the worst in some people. Often times the new guy is not the problem, but somehow gets one of the established band members to turn into a butthead, and then the band leader is in the awkward position of either firing non-necessary nice guy new guy or necessary asshole old guy from the band. In my experience, that usually ends up with the entire band calling it a day.

So, TL;DR - I'm always very skeptical of adding a "new guy," especially if his instrument is redundant. YMMV.

I would rather play a stripped down version of a song or too a backing track hen add another ego/mouth to feed lol.

Basically these 2. I don't see how the benefit of slightly more texture in the guitar parts will make up for the process of finding a guitarist who can play nice with 2 other guitarists in a band.
 


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