So, my singer hates Capo's and says they're lame and degrade the sound. Post your opinion! Lol

Discussion in 'General Music Discussion' started by Rev2010, May 8, 2021.

  1. HeHasTheJazzHands

    HeHasTheJazzHands SS.org Regular

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    Well there's a reason he's the singer and not the guitar player.
     
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  2. Strobe

    Strobe SS.org Regular

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    They do chew up your frets faster than fretting (it's a lot more pressure on them than a fretting hand). Other than that, they are very useful for changing the key on open chord stuff to best match your singer's range. I used one plenty during my acoustic guitar days. I do not play grandpas guitars as much as I used to.
     
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  3. BenjaminW

    BenjaminW SS.org Regular

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    I rarely use capos on my electrics but have no problem sticking them on my acoustics.

    Usually when I stick one on my acoustics, my inner George Harrison comes out.
     
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  4. efiltsohg

    efiltsohg SS.org Regular

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    They obviously change the sound of the guitar, it's personal preference whether it's acceptable or not
     
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  5. X1X

    X1X SS.org Regular

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    I dislike them because they confuse the hell out of me but as far as sound goes they don't bother me.
     
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  6. c7spheres

    c7spheres GuitArtist

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    Tell him he's right and you need another guitar, which he can buy. Then proceed to write many songs in different tunings. Enjoy new guitar collection!
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2021
  7. evade

    evade enthusiast

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    Maybe he puts it on wrong lmao
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2021
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  8. nickgray

    nickgray SS.org Regular

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    No worries, the singer in my old band was a dumbass as well :lol:
     
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  9. Rev2010

    Rev2010 Contributor

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    Exactly how do they change the sound of a guitar any differently than any other fretted note? The string is still vibrating off a nickel or stainless fret whether it's your finger holding the note down or a capo. And again, this is on a 5-string bass.
     
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  10. Edika

    Edika SS.org Regular

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    If you were playing acoustic then maybe it might have an effect but as people stated the difference might be on the open (now capoed) notes. But in the context of a song, with distortion and fast paced songs it's mostly the fact that he knows you're using a capo and the fact he doesn't like them. You can tell him the bassist is going to downtune for that song and just use the capo and have the bassist facing the other way. When the song is done you can ask him if it was better this way. If he says yes then he can turn and show him he has the capo on.
     
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  11. efiltsohg

    efiltsohg SS.org Regular

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    Nah, the elements behind the fret don't disappear. Even if they did, scale length makes a tonal difference. And on many guitars intonation will be affected
     
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  12. HeHasTheJazzHands

    HeHasTheJazzHands SS.org Regular

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    With my experience of using a Capo... I feel like the change in tone doesn't really matter when you're using gobs of distortion. Like I just used a capo for shits and giggles and I can't tell the difference between a fretted note or a capo'd note. :lol:
     
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  13. Rev2010

    Rev2010 Contributor

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    Intonation cannot be affected by a capo. No disrespect intended but if you know the science and physics of "intonation" you should know that intonation is a factor of string gauge + string length (this is why scale length matters) + action. That's it, nothing more. If a guitar or bass is properly intonated putting a capo on the second fret will have no affect on intonation, you're simply fretting a note and a properly intonated guitar will have near perfect pitch for each note from lowest to highest. If the capo spring is too strong that can cause the "pitch" to go a bit sharp but that is pitch and has nothing to do with the instruments intonation.
     
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  14. StevenC

    StevenC SS.org Regular

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    A guitar with at any fret will intonate worse than tuning up to that fret instead, because you're effectively shortening the scale length. Also capos tend to pull the strings tighter than fretting which will cause the guitar to be slightly sharp and in turn the guitar's intonation will slip further from ideal. "Proper" intonation is very much a relative thing. Relative to the tuning of the string, so when that is slightly sharper it will throw off your intonation.

    The ideal intonation spot is different between E and D, and is different between 25.5" and 26.5", so why wouldn't it be different between E at 25.5 and A(slightly#) at 19.1? There have been plenty of threads on this forum before about how intonation and inharmonicity are effected with scale length and capo use

    It won't effect intonation a massive amount on say a 6 string tuned to E, but on a 34" bass tuned to A it could be noticeable capoing at B or above. But to be honest, it's a bass, how many open string chords is your bassist using that a capo is necessary?

    Ultimately, I'm not a huge fan of capos. In my experience they're mostly employed by uninventive musicians who only want to learn the 6 or so basic open guitar chords. But for practicalities sake of saving you bringing another instrument to a gig to play the one song that has lots of open string pedaling in a different tuning, I don't care so much. Alternatively, I love Thick as a Brick and that's got a capo for a fairly legitimate reason, and I've seen a enough traditional musicians with their terrifying slide capo techniques.
     
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  15. TonyFlyingSquirrel

    TonyFlyingSquirrel Cherokee Warrior

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    Is this the same singer who decided to wear a neck choker to sing the song 2 semitones higher only to find out that this was a failure?

    I’m not saying nothing, I’m just sayin...
     
  16. odibrom

    odibrom .

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    What story is that?... and because of this I'm thinking that thankfully my band is instrumental...:D
     
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  17. Rev2010

    Rev2010 Contributor

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    It's a 35" scale bass, but regardless it still will not affect *intonation* in any way whatsoever. Either way regardless, no one has said a single word, singer included, about any parts of the bass lines recorded in this track which is the one I used the capo on my 5-string bass:

     
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  18. Hollowway

    Hollowway Extended Ranger

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    But you're not changing the scale length of the instrument when you use a capo. Inharmonicity occurs when you have a shorter scale length for a given tuning. A 25.5" instrument tuned in E is not going to have worse inharmonicity than a 28.625" instrument tuned to D. Where inharmonicity builds is when you have a shorter scale length, and want a lower tuning, and therefore have to use a thicker string that starts behaving as a rod.

    It is true that the guitar is a just intonation instrument, and tuning perfect intervals on an open string is going to result in less than perfect intervals fretted. But using a capo isn't any different if you tune to the capo as if it were a nut.

    And an improperly used capo will make all the strings sharp, that's true. But a properly used capo won't make them any sharper than fretting a note. I'm not sure that saying an improperly used capo means that all capos are bad.

    And there is no tonal difference based on what happens behind the nut/capo. That area of the string can affect the feel of the string, but not the tension or tone.

    And, not to be a dick, but if you think "capos are used mostly by uninventive musicians who only want to learn the 6 or so basic open guitar chords" then you need to get out more. Capos are certainly used by those who want to change a key and don't want to have to change the fingering. But they're also used by some incredibly innovative musicians to make some really cool music. Here is one such example:

     
  19. nickgray

    nickgray SS.org Regular

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    What? Capos are for playing in the correct key, especially when you're tuned in E standard and tuning higher isn't particularly feasible. They're used by virtually all guitarists, including classical guitarists.

    Yes, but you're also raising the pitch.

    I mean, it just doesn't make any sense whatsoever, capo is literally a barre chord across the whole fretboard. You fingers are basically "advanced capos" - instead of fretting vertically across the whole neck, you can fret individual strings with your fingers in the proximity of where your hand is. There's nothing magical or weird about a capo, it's the same as fretting with your fingers.
     
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  20. StevenC

    StevenC SS.org Regular

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    When you intonate the guitar relative to E, using a capo will change the intonation, if only slightly. Most people don't retune when they plop on the capo, and lots of guitars just can't be intonated more precisely than to the 12th fret. Maybe it's not a noticeable difference in practice, but it will likely need to be intonated slightly differently.

    I only really mentioned inharmonicity as a passing beat because some of the old threads about it here were specifically about using capos for more standard tunings and how that wouldn't produce the same results. Playing together, they will all sound the same playing note on the same string, but the A on the low E string at 19" sounds noticeably different to the open A and not just for being open.

    I don't think you're a dick, I was generalising probably excessively. There are plenty of great and creative uses for capos, but at least where I live every capo I've ever seen used has been because "this song is in a higher key" and I only know 6 chords. Which is where capos get the reputation of being for lazy people, which I've already said is not everybody just a very visible portion.
     
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