Removing 12th fret inlays

Discussion in 'Luthiery, Modifications & Customizations' started by narad, Dec 16, 2018.

  1. lewis

    lewis SS.org Regular

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    Maybe lightly sand down the board and carefully stain it (avoiding binding) That might darken the inlay so much you can barely see it?
     
  2. MaxOfMetal

    MaxOfMetal Likes trem wankery. Super Moderator

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    It's so thin that a black permanent marker will make most of it disappear unless you're looking for it.
     
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  3. Bearitone

    Bearitone SS.org Regular

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    Maybe matte nail polish across just that one space between the 11 and 12 fret?
     
  4. narad

    narad Progressive metal and politics

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    Lots of used original series / CS are like $2500, so as dumb as it is, even throwing $1k into fixing the board would be a $1-2k savings over new (though naturally that guitar is used and often has some light signs of being so).

    This is a major offender too:

    [​IMG]
     
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  5. xzacx

    xzacx SS.org Regular

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    Would be a lot more practical to get a whole new fretboard on that one. Which, is probably worth mentioning as an alternative fixing a board since it would obviously look perfect (although make it even less original). But it would have the bonus of being able to pick the exact frets you want and not be THAT much more expensive. I think it'd be realistic in the $500-600 range (depending on finish/binding/etc.) Not cheap, but a better final result IMO. I'm with you though—a bad inlay (or inlays) is a complete deal breaker no matter how much I might like everything else. It's probably one of my biggest pet peeves in all of "guitar stuff."
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2018
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  6. Dyingsea

    Dyingsea SS.org Regular

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    I'll just go ahead and say it... blank boards should be the defacto standard. So much classier than any markers etc. even your basic dots have no place IMO. Markers actually throw me off but they are unavoidable sometimes if you want a certain guitar.
     
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  7. JD27

    JD27 ESP Cult Member

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    Used is a different story, thought you meant new. I still wouldn’t risk fucking one up, you can find them from time to time without inlays. I had two CS artists sigs without inlays. Or just wait until the 2018s hit the used market.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 17, 2018
  8. DistinguishedPapyrus

    DistinguishedPapyrus SS.org Regular

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    Pull the frets off the area of the inlay and the frets just before and after the inlay starts. Route down the surface of the wood up to the edge of the fret slots by nearly exactly the thickness of the veneer used to cover it. It's gonna be built back up with a veneer. Cut little rectangles of veneer to build the surface of the wood back up to the right height and obviously it's important to try to match the grain and color, so you should have a good stack of veneers to pick from before you attempt it. the plastic binding may get damaged in the process, but it's easy to glue ABS binding back together and never be able to tell there was ever a seam. sand the wood smooth, clean up the fret slots and re-fret it, it will be a fretboard that otherwise has never had an inlay in it. The newly re-surfaced area would begin right under the fret crowns so your eyes would hardly ever be drawn to any sort of difference in the wood if the color and grain matches well enough.

    I'd totally attempt this on a cheap guitar as practice first though.
     
  9. narad

    narad Progressive metal and politics

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    Yea, the 2018s aren't bad, but still would way prefer a blank board.
     
  10. crackout

    crackout The Yellow One

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    On my first build, I messed up the unthinkable: I misplaced a fretboard inlay.

    When I noticed it, I tried to live with it (I was happy the guitar came out as good as it was). But this flaw was slowly driving me insane. After I finished my third build, I gathered enough confidence to attempt the fix. I think it came out pretty good.

    I removed the frets around the inlay and cut a small piece of ebony scrap. Luckily, I used round inlays, so I could just drill the faulty one out. Yay, I guess!

    IMG_0732.jpg


    Unfortunately, I don't have the guitar available anymore, so the only after-photo with some kind of detail on the inlays that I can proivide is this:

    IMG_0743.jpg


    It was a relatively simple fix that meant the world. I was at piece.
     
  11. Bearitone

    Bearitone SS.org Regular

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    Woah, i don’t even see any trace of a pocket or cavity where the inlays used to be. How did you do that?
     

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