Quick Question!

Discussion in 'Music Theory, Lessons & Techniques' started by cult-leader-of-djent, Aug 11, 2013.

  1. cult-leader-of-djent

    cult-leader-of-djent SS.org Regular

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    I want to know about chords and keys.

    So say I learned the "D minor" scale.

    I'm utilizing it to solo and create new riffs.

    But the question is : can I use any chords in the Key of D minor? :scratch:

    Explain it thoroughly. Not only will it help me but it'll help test your knowledge of music theory!
     
  2. Idontpersonally

    Idontpersonally Banned

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    Why not just watch a video about it:scratch:..
     
  3. cult-leader-of-djent

    cult-leader-of-djent SS.org Regular

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    ^Hmm let me watch this than I'll see if it helps!

    Thanks for posting
     
  4. AugmentedFourth

    AugmentedFourth X:1 K:C [c^f]|

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    Hmm... a somewhat nebulous question, but the answer is yes, I suppose.

    Of course, you can use any chords you want, but I'm sure that wasn't the answer you were looking for. :rolleyes:

    Apology in advance: Sorry if this seems slightly patronizing in parts... I really took your "Explain it thoroughly" seriously. :lol:
    Basically, if you are in the key of D minor, like you said, and you are creating 'riffs' from the associated scale, and you want to harmonize said 'riffs', then you would use those same notes. That's what I'm assuming you meant by

    (emphasis added)

    When creating the chords, you start with the root note, which may be any note in the scale you are using, say, Bb. (Notably the 6th scale degree of D minor.) Then you pile onto it the note a third above it and then the note a fifth above it.

    We could keep adding notes by going up in thirds, but I wouldn't want to bore you with jazz chords. :barf:

    What this looks like is we start at Bb and then move up two notes (Bb...C...) to D, and then two more (D...E...) to F. Then we throw them together any which way we want, and...

    [​IMG]

    voilà. You have a chord from the key you are in (D minor). Notice that the F is 7 half steps above our root Bb. This makes it specifically a perfect fifth, as opposed to 6 half steps, which would make it diminished. And notice that the D is 4 half steps above Bb. This makes it a major third, as opposed to 3 half steps, which would make it minor. Together that means that we have a major triad (major chord).

    All that boring chord-brewing crap aside, there's one way to look at all this mess that you might like. We can generalize any minor scale (you'll see how this can be applied to any other scale later) in a way that lets us quickly tell which chords go where.

    We are going to label each scale degree by counting them "1, 2, 3, 4...", but with Roman numerals, because it ends up being less confusing.

    In D minor:

    Code:
    D E  F   G  A Bb  C
    I II III IV V VI  VII
    
    And then, we make chords (seven chords, to be exact), similarly to the way we did it above, using each note, in order, as the 'root'.

    Key: Dm = D minor chord; Fmaj = F major chord; Edim = E diminished chord
    Code:
    Dm Edim Fmaj Gm Am Bbmaj Cmaj
    I  II   III  IV V  VI    VII
    
    Then we can use the Roman numerals to generalize this pattern of minor, diminished, major, minor, minor, major, major.

    Key: Capital letter = major; lowercase = minor; ° = diminished
    Code:
    Dm Edim Fmaj Gm Am Bbmaj Cmaj
    i  ii°  III  iv v  VI    VII
    
    ...and so we can use this 'Roman numeral representation' garbage to easily show the chord types/qualities and where they go in any given scale. As you have already imagined I'm sure, this can just as easily be done with other scales:

    Major: I ii iii IV V vi vii°
    Harmonic Minor: i ii° III+ iv V VI vii°
    note: + means 'augmented'. That just means a major third and an augmented fifth (8 half steps).
    Melodic Minor: i ii III+ IV V vi° vii°

    etc, etc...

    Theorists like to use this stuff to notate very common, strong harmonic movements, which you might want to learn for yourself -- seeing as you already know them, just not by their names. (e.g., ii-V-I, IV-V-I, I-V-vi-IV, etc.) But that's another explanation entirely..... :nuts:
     
  5. cult-leader-of-djent

    cult-leader-of-djent SS.org Regular

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    Thank you for the thorough explanation it really has helped me to grasp the concept more!:agreed:

    I wish I knew how to thank you officially on this site or I would.
     
  6. Skygoneblue

    Skygoneblue Frankensteeeeein!

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    You click the Like button at the bottom of his post - it adds to his reputation as a good poster.
     
  7. TheKindred

    TheKindred TimeTravel Innovator

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    The like button only indicates you like the post. To add rep you need to click the scale under the username. :yesway:
     
  8. tyler_faith_08

    tyler_faith_08 Strings of Chaos

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    Try it on mine. I'll let you know if you're doing it right.

    Also, take a look at my thread on Chord Theory. It's not start to finish thorough, but I think it'll give you a basic understanding.
     

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