Project S906 #5

Discussion in 'Dealers & Group Buys' started by RestorationAD, Jan 31, 2011.

  1. RestorationAD

    RestorationAD SS.org Regular

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    S906 #5


    Flame Maple/Ebony neck attached to a super thin Undecided body with hipshot parts and custom pickups.

    Aiming for prog all world fast shreader 6 strings light enough to enjoy.

    Neck :Flame Maple/Ebony
    Fretboard : ????
    Scale : 25.5
    Frets : 24
    Trussrod : ALLPARTS

    Body : ???? (33mm)
    Tuners : Hipshot
    Pickups : Diablo
    Bridge : Hipshot
    Electronics : 1 Push/pull


    Neck blank and the possible top glued together.
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    ElRay likes this.
  2. RestorationAD

    RestorationAD SS.org Regular

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    Preparing the neck blank. Square one side on the jointer so I can run it through the drum sander. Of course the jointer loves to tear and chip flamed wood so I use very minimal cuts and stop as soon as it is flat enough. Then I run it through the drum sander. The blank really needs to be sqaure and true. If not the jigs do not work right.
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  3. RestorationAD

    RestorationAD SS.org Regular

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    Time to mark the blank. It is a little thinner than I wanted (1.6 vs 1.75) but it will do.

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  4. RestorationAD

    RestorationAD SS.org Regular

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    Here is the Scarf Jig. Pretty simple actually. 8/4 piece of poplar cut at 14 degrees off 90 degrees. With a face plate glued to it that gives my a place to clamp. One important part is that it is completely square to the table. The scarf will be crooked if it is not.
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  5. RestorationAD

    RestorationAD SS.org Regular

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    The jig is clamped to the table and the neck blank is clamped to the jig. This keeps the fingers away from the monster and helps protect against kick back. I go very slow and carefully guide the saw through the cut. It has a tendency to grab and pull itself into the blank... bad things. Oh don't loose the little cut-off as we will use that later when we are clamping.
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  6. RestorationAD

    RestorationAD SS.org Regular

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    Now to free our headstock from the blank. Setup the bandsaw fence to rip a 1" (actually .95") piece from the back of the blank. I stop at the heal section.
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    After freeing the headstock section I run it through the drum sander to true it up. Now the reason we made sure everything was square becomes more apparent. Since everything is square lining up the stripes is easy. Lay the blank on a flat surface and check it.
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  7. RestorationAD

    RestorationAD SS.org Regular

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    Remember our little cut off? well we will use that to create a flat clamping surface. Once the neck is aligned use a quick clamp to hold the joint and drill some locater/holding pins. These pins should be at the very edges of the blank so they are not in the neck at any point.
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    Cover both surfaces with glue and position the neck on the flat surface. Use a quick clamp to hold it temporarily while you locate your pins and drive them in. Break out a bigger clamp and position it right in the front of the fretboard side of the scarf making sure it is centered in the blank. This will put the most pressure in the part of the actual scarf that will survive the neck build. Then reposition your other clamps to fit.
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  8. RestorationAD

    RestorationAD SS.org Regular

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    Finished for the day as I am out of clamps.
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  9. RestorationAD

    RestorationAD SS.org Regular

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    So to continue on with the scarf tutorial. We are left with a large block sticking up from the face of our blank. Start with the template and draw the line for the face of neck.
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    Use the bandsaw and cut along the line.
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  10. RestorationAD

    RestorationAD SS.org Regular

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    The next part is tricky and has a risk of blow out. Using the jointer to plane down to the surface of the neck has all kinds of issues. With figured wood it is easy to tear out large chunks (made several pieces of laminated firewood this way). I still do it because I am impatient.
    The main thing I can say is practice on scraps.

    Holding the neck parallel to the table plane down until you are almost flush with the face. Do not plane to the surface of the face. It will tear out. The reason you hold it parallel and don't let the end touch is because you would then create an angle and be forced to plane the whole face of the neck to regain a true face... this in turn would change the angle on the heal which would have to also be corrected. Be careful and pay attention.
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    Now to finish up take the neck to a really flat surface with sandpaper attached and true up the last mm by hand. Try not to rock as you do this. I usually try and turn the neck a few times while I am doing this. That way I correct any skew I create.
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  11. RestorationAD

    RestorationAD SS.org Regular

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    Looks good. Now to fix up the heal. I use 1" heal so cut it on the bandsaw and run it through the drum sander.
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  12. RestorationAD

    RestorationAD SS.org Regular

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    I was curious about the joint after I saw a small glue line. I cut in a bit with the belt sander and it is all good.
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  13. RestorationAD

    RestorationAD SS.org Regular

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    Trimming up the back of the headstock. Using the fence on the bandsaw allows for less mistakes.
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  14. RestorationAD

    RestorationAD SS.org Regular

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    I think I might use this top for this one... not sure yet I have some other stuff coming. I don't like the spalt pattern in this one so I am thinking about using the burl side. I won't actually decide for a few weeks.
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    About 2 minutes after this photo I checked the blank with my template. I missed by an inch (idiot moment)... I had to break it apart and reposition the halves. I had no idea how tough it is to get titebond apart after only a few minutes. I had to put my knee into the middle to get ti to let go. So I applied more glue and repositioned the halves. Well after a few hours I came out to check on it...It has a horrible glue line on top. Looks like I will be cutting it apart next weekend and starting over.

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  15. yacker

    yacker SS.org Regular

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    I like all the builds man, but I'm pretty completely confused about what it is you are explaining in the above. Is there any way you could clarify?

    Are you talking about planning down the headstock portion before gluing or...????:scratch:. Are you talking about surfacing the neck actual face that will get the fretboard glued to it? This talk of parallel and not letting an end touch has me stumped. I'm completely confused.
     
  16. RestorationAD

    RestorationAD SS.org Regular

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    Sorry I did a really bad job of explaining something really simple and probably common sense.....

    Try this.

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  17. yacker

    yacker SS.org Regular

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    HAHAHA, awesome!

    Thanks a bunch, the illustration makes perfect sense.
     
  18. RestorationAD

    RestorationAD SS.org Regular

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    I hate this method and was hesitant to suggest it. For the record in about a month I am buying this edge sander. Then I won't be doing crazy jointer tricks anymore.
     
  19. RestorationAD

    RestorationAD SS.org Regular

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    Ok after the joint test fail I decided to get a new set of body blank clamps. The 20 year old ponies were great but the 2 cheap clamps were useless. Oh the joint test... I grabbed one side of the blank and wacked it against the floor of the garage, twice. Sounded really good the first swing, nice ring, sustain, overall good tone. The second swing it snapped right on the joint. That is the example of a bad joint.
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    Roughed the top in. Still not sure this is the top for this guitar but for now it is.
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  20. RestorationAD

    RestorationAD SS.org Regular

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    This is a tip that will help you live with the beast. If you cut a small piece of foam (or you can use a small bead of dried silicone) and drop it in the throat of your router. It will help prevent bottoming out the bit. When the bit bottoms out it is way more likely to vibrate lose and cause destruction (ask me how I know). Use a high density foam with good spring.
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