Preferred way to program drums?

Discussion in 'Recording Studio' started by nateispro, Jul 13, 2019 at 11:42 AM.

  1. nateispro

    nateispro SS.org Regular

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    What way do you guys like to program drums? By mouse? Keyboard? Or drum pads? I have a nanokey im struggling to get working again and im thinking about just going for towards using just the mouse, what way do you prefer to program drum tracks and why?
     
  2. PatientMental76

    PatientMental76 SS.org Regular

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    Why dont you just use the midi grid with your daw
     
  3. thrashinbatman

    thrashinbatman SS.org Regular

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    I used to do it in GuitarPro, but I've recently been getting used to doing it in the Reaper grid. Programming drums ain't so bad with the mouse in Reaper.
     
  4. nateispro

    nateispro SS.org Regular

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    Woops my bad! That's what i meant by doing it with the mouse.

    Thats good to know! Did you like doing it in guitarpro? Ive read of tons of people doing it that way
     
  5. CLAYSHAPER

    CLAYSHAPER SS.org Regular

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    I also write music in Guitar pro so it's natural that I just transfer the midi drums to Cubase when it's time to record for real. I keep it real simple in GP though. When the skeleton of the track is inside Cubase I use my mouse and ears to make the patterns intricate with the drum editor. I mind that my robot drummer is right handed and try not to make impossible patterns. I humanize the whole performance by randomly making everything slightly off beat and a small variance in velocity. The last step is implementing the right handed mentality and put emphasis on core hits, for example the first cymbal on the verse, different power on hits on the fills, fast ones have naturally lower power. That's about it.
     
  6. JesperX

    JesperX SS.org Regular

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    I use the piano roll in Reaper but I’ve been considering getting a midi pad that can do velocities so that I can rough them out by playing a couple passes and just nudge them into place. Not sure if it would be all that much faster though.

    Best bet on the piano roll is to work in sections, copy/paste, and then modify the bits that need to be different in that section.
     
  7. GunpointMetal

    GunpointMetal SS.org Regular

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    Mouse, Piano Roll. I've gotten so used to working in the grid in Reaper that it usually takes me longer to tab out my guitar parts than program drums. Most of the stuff that I program gets scrapped once a live drummer starts working on the song, so I don't spend a lot of time with velocities and stuff as its basically a fancy metronome to demo stuff to.
     
  8. ToneLab

    ToneLab Bedroom Playa

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    I'll either start with a loop in EZ drummer 2 and use the function in there for inserting fills - sometimes that works great and sometimes it doesn't depending on the loop/song or, in Studio One 4 - with the new pattern editor - I'm using that more and more.
     
  9. TonyFlyingSquirrel

    TonyFlyingSquirrel Cherokee Warrior

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    I have a basic bass line that I use when my bass player and I demo parts from our riff library.
    I paste the bass parts into the midi drum track's Piano Roll/step editor in Pro Tools & then change all the notes from the bass line to the kick & snare drums respectively, then start adding hi hat & other parts in there, with sprinkles throughout, especially the fills.

    Helps me to get more cohesion with the drumz & bass working together as a rhythm section.
     
  10. thrashinbatman

    thrashinbatman SS.org Regular

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    Writing in GuitarPro is useful if you use it for tabbing and songwriting. I do that, so programming drums in it is cool. However you're limited to the choices GP gives you, which is generally way less than what your drum plugin gives you. You also have much looser control over velocity. If you're just demoing it's cool, but if you're actually trying to use it for something serious then you probably should program in the DAW.
     
  11. crossthestyx

    crossthestyx SS.org Regular

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    I have a template in Reaper with 2 Superior drummer plugins and the drums broken down/separated. Plus 1 EZ Drummer2 plugin set up as well. I use EZ Drummer2 to "tap to find loops" with the beat of the rhythm. (mouse) Then adjust timing. EZD2 works about 50% of the time when just writing and structuring a song initially. Then I'll pull the loops into Superior Drummer and modify or change them completely depending on how satisfied I was with the original beat. (adding, subtracting, tuning down, tuning up, changing snares, volume adjustments/mix etc.) I use an IRig25 (nano keyboard) when I can't find or modify a loop to write a new midi score. I fx 1 of the superior drummer plugins before rendering down. I hate programing drums, so this makes things go a bit faster when writing, but it is also a bit messy as well. lol :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2019 at 1:14 PM
  12. ATRguitar91

    ATRguitar91 SS.org Regular

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    You don't have to be limited by what choices GP gives you. You can just write in the corresponding midi value that works with your plugin. In GP it may be a wood block or something, but once it's transferred it'll be whatever it is in the plugin. I do this all the time because GP only has one China cymbal and I prefer to write drums with two.

    In terms of velocity, it's not to hard to fine tune the velocity and timings once you get it moved over.
     

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