Peavey Triple X, fredman mic’d

Discussion in 'Recording Studio' started by youngthrasher9, Feb 28, 2021.

  1. youngthrasher9

    youngthrasher9 SS.org Regular

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    I’ve been slowly ironing out my mic positioning, and lately I’ve been finding my clips have been too bright without a lot of EQ, but today I actually created a tone that I’m happy with. The difference? I mic’d the Eminence Wizard as opposed to the Swamp Thang in my cabinet. As the title implies, it’s fredman mic’d (the true 55 degrees), with the straight mic aimed right at the glue blob on the cone. Guitar is a 28.75” baritone with a dimarzio d-activator in the bridge, amp is an E34L loaded Peavey Triple X, boosted with a Joyo vintage overdrive (808 clone). Don’t mind the playing.
    https://soundcloud.app.goo.gl/ReajGzZtvR3ZFadJ9
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2021
  2. VESmedic

    VESmedic SS.org Regular

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    The only way you’re going to actually know how your guitar tone is going to sit is, at minimum, posting a double tracked clip panned 100/100 to start. I see guys doing this all the time: there’s no context with this really. It’s the same with mic placement, small mic adjustments aren’t totally audible or not something you can put your finger on until you double track it and pan them out wide: THEN you notice the differences. I mean if you like this tone great, but there’s really no way to tell anything about it until it’s applied in context with at minimum double tracking and panning.this is the recording forum, so that’s why I’m coming at from the angle I am, and panning 100/100 because I assume you’re playing high gain metal style music with that setup and those tones etc.


    On that note, the “fredman” technique is overrated, and not necessary for most. I would concentrate on finding great tones with a single mic first, simply because i guarantee you most of your favorite tones were done with a single 57. Then start to learn about eq’ing in your daw: start simple first.
     
  3. Drew

    Drew Forum MVP

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    Yeah, not much to add to the above - it sounds fine, maybe a little room-y, but to really get a feel for how this is going to sound in a mix, you need to, well, put it in a mix. Write a quick riff, throw some drums and bass behind it, etc.

    I'd also note that, beyond what's already pretty good advice (if you can't get at least a decent tone out of a single SM57, you're going to struggle to get anything decent out of two mics), for the most part when you're working with two mics on a guitar cab, one of them - for me, the SM57 - is still your "primary" mic, and your second mic is really mostly there to support and flesh out the sound of the first. Getting that first mic to sound as good as possible is still your primary goal (I don't even bother listening to a second mic until I've got something pretty good going with my first), and that's just as applicable with a single mic as with two, of course.
     
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  4. nightlight

    nightlight SS.org Regular

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    Hmm, you got that glue blob idea from Nolly, right? One thing to remember: what works for one person may not work for you when it comes down to your mixing strategy. Don't treat it as gospel, and don't be afraid to experiment with other placements.

    Listening to the tone, I thought it was pretty good, but as others suggested, you need to hear it in a mix context always, because it is well night impossible to tell if a guitar in isolation will work in a mix.

    You can also just double track the guitars without the other elements in the mix to get a quick and dirty idea of how they sound panned hard left and right.

    Just keep at it! One good way to tweak your tone is to record a guitar DI signal and then send that to your amp so that you can position the mic and also tweak the amp controls without having to keep playing.

    All said and done, good job! Nothing like actually getting down to work at the end of the day instead of sitting on one's ass! :hbang:
     
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  5. youngthrasher9

    youngthrasher9 SS.org Regular

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    Thank you all for the advice. I do have a reamp box, I’ve been meaning try the DI method of mic positioning and what not. As far as the fredman technique goes, I’ve just found my 57’s to be a very bright pair, hence the use of both using this method. I’ll be giving a single mic a run again, I’m curious to try again with fresh ears.
     
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  6. Drew

    Drew Forum MVP

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    SM57s are pretty bright - they roll off above 16khz or so, but there's a bit of a spike around 7khz. The good news, is this can give them a LOT of cut and bite in a mix, and any of the fizz above that, well, can be dealt with easily enough anyway, but tends to get lost behind the wash of the cymbals anyway.

    The SM57 on it's own is a mic I don't really like in isolation, and veered away from it for years because of this. But, double track and pan them hard L/R and throw some bass and drums in the mix, or run a lead track right down the center with some stereo delay to give it space, and it pretty much sits exactly where you want an electric guitar to sit. The hard thing, I think, with working with multiple mic setups, is they can make a guitar sound "bigger" and "fuller" than a SM57 alone... but in a mix, that's not always going to be an improvement. It really does sound awfully good in context.
     
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