Parker MaxxFly 7 string models - [and compared to EBMM]

Discussion in 'Sevenstring Guitars' started by Fluence of Shred, Mar 29, 2020.

  1. Fluence of Shred

    Fluence of Shred SS.org Regular

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    These guitars look incredible like most Parker’s. I havent had the chance to play one, though Ive tried a 6 string - very light guitars, ergonomic, and nice to play.

    I did think there was a little less tonal strength, but that was perhaps just a first impression through the rig i was trying at the time, which wasnt the best.

    Anyone have one of these? How do you like them and can you compare them to a Majesty?

    They seem to be on the same leve of uniqueness and incredible build quality, though the parker is twice the amount

    I’d like to know more about the 7 string Parker’s, and please post pics or vids of yours!
     
  2. MaxAidingAres

    MaxAidingAres SS.org Regular

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    I own a parker fly and it is probably one of the best designed (features wise) guitars ive ever played. The fact that its 25 years old blows me away. Now for the parker 7 string. Id say it should be the same quality. The thing is, parker only made a few 7 strings before they went out of business. The rarity is in conjunction with the price. I’m sure its on par with the quality of a majesty but majesties offer just about everything the parker does, ss frets, piezo, etc the only thing it doesnt have is the carbonfibre. Id say the makesty would be a better deal guitar for money wise but the parker would probably hold its value much better.
     
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  3. c7spheres

    c7spheres GuitArtist

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    I use to have an original Fly Deluxe from 1995 or something. Absolutely incredible guitar. I sol it when I switched to 7's but the build quality looks to be the same. Keep in mind with these if something goes wrong it may not be repairable, like the bridge in particular.
    - If I wanted something modern like this I would go with an Aristides. The one I played gave me a similar feeling or quality and attention to detail. It played very similar too. Both Parker and the Aristides are two of the best playing and feeling guitars I've ever played.
     
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  4. oracles

    oracles Australian in Canada

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    I owned a Maxxfly 7 for a while and heavily regret selling it. It outclassed any EBMM I've ever played, artist customs included. The parker was lighter, had better fretwork, sounded and played better, was more ergonomic, and tonally flexible.

    I ended up selling it because of its inability to accept string gauges over a .58, but if that's not a deal breaker for you, youd be insane to choose an EBMM over the Parker.

    https://www.sevenstring.org/threads/ngd-custom-shop-parker-maxxfly-7.323195/
     
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  5. eelblack2

    eelblack2 Fewel Contributor

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  6. efiltsohg

    efiltsohg SS.org Regular

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    On a 7, really? I use heavier strings than that on 6 lol
     
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  7. xzacx

    xzacx SS.org Regular

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    I don’t think it was from you, but I almost bought this one before and have been kicking myself ever since. I just couldn’t pay that much for a color I didn’t like, but they’re so few and far between I should have just lived with it.
     
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  8. oracles

    oracles Australian in Canada

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    It was a...unique design choice, not one I would've personally made, but I also couldn't bring myself to drill out the bridge at that time to accept larget gauges. In hindsight I wish I had've because I heavily regret selling it
     
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  9. narad

    narad Progressive metal and politics

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    :minions:
     
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  10. Chebax

    Chebax SS.org Regular

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    Not a 7, but I own a 98 Parker Fly Deluxe and it's easily the best guitar I've ever played. I bought it almost 17 years ago and it's still my main guitar.
    It's not for everyone (and it's definitely not the most metal guitar out there), but if you need the versatility and appreciate the light weight Parkers are awesome.

    If the MaxxFly 7s are anything like the Original Fly, I'd totally recommend it.

    Plus, every second guy out there owns a Majesty. ;)
     
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  11. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    I think Parker Flys were the best mass produced guitars out there in their heyday. I deperately wanted a 7 string version, decades ago, and when the maxfly came out, I simply couldn't find one anywhere
     
  12. Fluence of Shred

    Fluence of Shred SS.org Regular

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    This is a very helpful post, and I appreciate all of your input. Basically you are answering questions I didn't even know I had:
    1)Parker made a 7 string
    a. when they were in business
    I. I now know they are no longer being made
    b. they went under decades ago
    2) The price was still high when I possibly could've gotten one
    3) EBMM and Parker offer almost the same features and quality, though the EBMM is cheaper
    4) Biggest difference is the carbon fiber

    I wonder if the Parker "needed" the carbon fiber because of the cork, whereas EBMM didn't install it for either cost [though at $3500 MSRP I don't see why not] or difficulty in manufacturing

    Actually, why would ebmm skip the carbon?

    this is probably most important: the bridge is not only possibly irreparable or replaceable if damaged, but it also is not as "built for speed" as is the EBMM bridge...so thanks actually for really bringin' it in!
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2020
  13. pylyo

    pylyo SS.org Regular

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    I owned two Parker 7s, both in black, they were the best 7 strings I have ever played. I loved my Suhr 7, that one was a real gem too.
    Sold them because I ended my 7 string journey but will probably try to score me another one eventually, sooo good.
    That thing with the string gauge is the real problem tho.

    [​IMG]
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  14. sakeido

    sakeido Contributor

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    Parker (and Steinberger) are basically the only guys to push the technological envelope with solidbody electric guitars since Grover Jackson first invented the superstrat.

    EBMM Majesties aren't even remotely close to Parkers. The Majesty is bizarre looking like a Parker, but in the end its just a normal guitar, built the same way every other guitar has been forever. The "only" thing its missing is the carbon fiber...? That's the biggest thing to lose. The fretboard is unlike anything else I've tried. It's not just carbon fiber, it's glass too. Premium ebony feels like cheap rosewood after playing a Parker.

    My Parker 6 gets about 90% of my playtime but never leaves the house anymore. Repairability is a huge concern with these. You can get parts for some things but if you were to ever damage the neck in any way, it's done.

    I passed on a Maxxfly 7 for $3800 USD a few years ago, and regret it. You'd be extremely lucky to find a 7 south of $5K now. They only made a couple dozen. If you can find a Parker 7, get it. Hell if you can find a Parker, period, get it. They never sold in big numbers and prices are appreciating fast. The longer you wait, the less affordable they're gonna be.

    edit: whoops, yeah, tonal strength. They do sound thin, but you can fix that. I put BKP War Pigs in mine so it went from thin to huge. It's maybe my best sounding guitar although my Stripped 58 comes close. If you want to change the pickups in a 7, you need to send the stock pickups out to be customized because of how they mount into the guitar.
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2020
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  15. Fluence of Shred

    Fluence of Shred SS.org Regular

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    It seems there are two ways people generally feel: Parkers are untouchable and even a majesty doesn’t compare or the closest thing to a Parker is a majesty. Having played 6 string Parkers and EBMM, I know the latter is objectively more accurate, as you could say the same thing about Steinberger. At the same time, you’re totally right about Parker and Steinberger being the most outside the box of all companies, and I think that’s your most salient point.
     
  16. MaxAidingAres

    MaxAidingAres SS.org Regular

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    i dont think you have to worry about parts breaking on a parker unless you are reckless. Like the electronic ribbon cable can be fragile but who touches or messes with there electronics except for pickup swaps. The other thing is the tremolo spring, they use a plate style spring that flexes and is designed for specified tension (9s/10s/11setc) if you string 11s with a 9s spring in e standard it will break or most likely will.

    the majesty is a great guitar and shouldnt be ignored however the parker has insane design and craftsmanship.
    The fly is the only full size non headless guitar, that weighs less than 6 lbs, has ss frets, piezo system, and carbon fiber back and fretboard. The carbon fiber allows these guitars to be the most stable and reliable guitars around.
    Also parker used carbon as a way to stabilize and reinforce their guitars. The fly is made with a poplar body and basswood neck (set glued not neck through). The neck heel is so thin causing it to be almost impossible to handle string tension. But with the carbon fiber, it makes them some of the most rigid and stable guitars around. It is a trip though considering the weight thinness etc. if you are used to thick chunky guitars youd be scared at first
     
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  17. sakeido

    sakeido Contributor

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    imo my Suhr is the closest thing to my Parker I've played. I didn't think the three Majesties I've tried or my old JP7 were all that close really.
     
  18. Fluence of Shred

    Fluence of Shred SS.org Regular

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    For sure, the carbon fiber is an exceptional element. I wasn’t downplaying it; the Parker’s carbon+glass is what makes it special really....isnt it? It’s incredible, the design and the sound, just an amazing guitar and if I could get my hands on a 7 string, I would definitely get one

    As far as the carbon fiber, yes, thats’ why I thought his point about Steinberger was just as astute. NOW that, is innovative, one solid carbon graphite with the Trans Trem system and a Roland Midi pup! Those are harder to find than Parker’s, and they go up to 20k!

    Anyways, if someone sees a 7 string parker and they arent going to snag it, please forward it my way! Lol ;)
     
  19. narad

    narad Progressive metal and politics

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    Well I mean, $4-5k is about going rate for a maintained one. I've seen some crazy _asking_ prices, but I haven't seen substantiated high selling prices.
     
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  20. bzhang9

    bzhang9 SS.org Regular

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    both 6/7 flys are in its own class with play-ability, design, uniqueness, far more so than "innovative" guitars like strandbergs, aristides, majesty etc

    compared to the majesty which is one of the lightest, sleekest, fastest playing guitars, the fly is even lighter, sleeker, faster, trem is better, and way better looking IMO
     
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