Note overshoot and string gauge

Discussion in 'Beginners/FAQ' started by Quitty, Dec 20, 2013.

  1. Quitty

    Quitty Hates 'mojo'

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    Has anyone gone down in string gauge before? Why?

    I can barely recall why i kept going up in diameters as i was learning to play the guitar, but my sixer had a .13-.56 set (drop C) before i moved to sevens.
    I'm now using a 10-17 for my plain strings and .30-.70 for the wound ones (tuned standard), but i'm getting really sick of the overshoot my heavy-handed technique is causing on open strings, and even on fretted ones for the low B.

    I got to play one of my students squire strat a couple of days ago and surprisingly enough, hardly any overshoot with the miserable .09-.46. :scratch:
    I've had the same experience with some stock Gibsons in the past, but i figured i just don't play as aggressively on a guitar that isn't mine.
    Seeing as buying strings and trying for myself would require international shipping or a mortgage, what's your opinion? Experience?
     
  2. jephjacques

    jephjacques BUTTS LOL

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    The long-term solution is to clean up your technique.
     
  3. Quitty

    Quitty Hates 'mojo'

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    Yes and no. I can avoid the overshoot, but i'd have to pick softer than i would like, sound-wise.
     
  4. Lach Rae Dawn

    Lach Rae Dawn SS.org Regular

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    On my Loomis, I keep it in standard tuning, and stay with the regular slinky cobalt strings from EB, at 10-56. 26.5 scale.

    Feels good to me, but I plan on getting a new 7 string in 2014 to compliment my Loomis. I am looking at the new Banshee series (26.5 scale), but I plan to go hipshot bridge, and Tune Drop A, or a Whole Step down.
    So I will prolly go with the power slinky 11-58 setup in the cobalt from EB there. Until they come out with more variations in the 7 string cobalt setups.
     
  5. Axewield31

    Axewield31 SS.org Regular

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    I think you could work out your technique to fix it. You could still be picking just as hard but have more control in your follow through. The slightly wider string spacing on the 6 would have contributed to the fact you were cleaner when playing it.

    I don't think you should go to a heavier gauge. You're plenty heavy enough.
    Just use what you have and really concentrate on controlling your follow through.



    It may also help with lighter strings, but I'm not 100%. I can imagine it helping because you're not have such a massive jolt in tension loss when your pick leaves the string. Could be something to look into.
     
  6. Svava

    Svava Djento ergo sum

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    I think using a lighter string gauge and forcing yourself to brush the strings rather than dig in is the best long term solution for tone.

    My technique just overnight got hella better when I realized that I don't need to punch the strings.

    That being said... punching feels nice ><

    So you've kinda gotta decide I guess xD
     
  7. Quitty

    Quitty Hates 'mojo'

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    ATM i'm really enjoying lowering the gain to crunch-territory and just digging in to get high-gain, and that's just not possible with open notes, for example.

    Question is if lighter gauges would - by themselves - reduce the overshoot.
     
  8. Svava

    Svava Djento ergo sum

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    My thought is that the heavier gauge would decrease the sharpness of the overshoot but increase the sustain / time it takes to return to the pitch you're trying to produce. My logic would be that since it's heavier it'd not move as far (not go as far over) but since it's more massive it'll have the momentum it needs to flap around longer before losing momentum and zeroing in on the pitch you want.

    Contrastingly a lighter string has less momentum so it's likely to pop out for the overshoot and ping right back to the note you want since it won't have its heavy momentum flapping it back and forth across the note you want...

    Not sure if that makes sense but that's just what I would think would be the case based on my knowledge of "stuff" in general :p I have no qualification to advise you on this.

    I personally get more overshoot on my sevenstring with a heavier gauge than my lighter gauge guitars. More noticable overshoot anway - and I'm a light ass picker xD
     
  9. loktide

    loktide dotlike Contributor

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    hitting hard could actually be considered good technique for rhythm guitar, imo.

    i'm surprised nobody mentioned the pick yet. try a lighter one or one with a sharper tip. also picking closer to the bridge is a good idea
     
  10. TRENCHLORD

    TRENCHLORD Banned

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    Tighter tension makes for less of a vibration loop, but it must be played harder to sound like it's being dug into.

    I think we all begin to immediately compensate (at least those who use their ears to determine their technique) when changing to a different tension, so lighter tension needs less picking force to have that attackful sound (especially with active pups).
    Obviously less picking force means less pitch sharpening when striking the note.

    I was up to 13-60 at C-standard on my sixes at one time, but after awhile I started walking the tension back down and have arrived at 11-56 on my one C-tuned guitar.
     
  11. Axewield31

    Axewield31 SS.org Regular

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    Sorry, I was totally misunderstanding your problem. What I thought you meant was that you were over picking and hitting the string above the one you wanted to play. Sorry about that, disregard what I said before.

    I remember hearing Ola Englund, who is notorious for having a heavy right hand, talking about this issue. He said that he would combat it by using guitars with a longer scale length. That's the best way I can think to do it, short of an Evertune bridge system.
    As for string gauge, I can't think of a logical reason why lighter strings would be better, but for some reason I think it's possible :lol:
     
  12. bluffalo

    bluffalo SS.org Regular

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    I love my 27" scale guitars precisely because of this. I can't even play a les paul in e standard tuning anymore, because I hate the notes going sharp when you hit the strings harder for that sound.
     
  13. Riffer Madness

    Riffer Madness Thrashing since '96

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    I used big gauges for years to mask sloppy picking and get thicker tone until i fooled around on a guitar with 9's a few years ago. I really liked the chromatics i was hearing in my slides on the high side, and the easy legato.

    After being impressed by Chris Broderick's clean speed, i switched to 10's, and my picking cleaned up tremendously.

    I wish i could travel back in time and slap myself for using thick strings and flexible picks.
     
  14. clintsal

    clintsal Humbub

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    I just replaced the 56 for drop C on my guitar for a 49 (elixir nanos), and a while back switched from 1.14mm picks to 50, 60, 73, or 88 (depending on how I feel), and my tone is SO much clearer. Also, when I put the lighter gauge on, I did lose a bit of the thickness in the tone that I liked, but the snap and impact of picked notes actually comes out more aggressive and 'heavier' sounding now. Dial up the bass on your amp, good to go.

    EDIT: My right hand playing is much cleaner now too. I am also heavy handed, but with the new setup I can get a similar aggressiveness w less right hand effort / exertion, and focus more on accuracy and speed.
     
  15. Quitty

    Quitty Hates 'mojo'

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    Thanks guys, i guess i'll give a thinner gauge a go. Maybe downstep to .60 or so.
     

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