New Practice Routine

Discussion in 'Music Theory, Lessons & Techniques' started by TheDivineWing22, Aug 19, 2013.

  1. TheDivineWing22

    TheDivineWing22 You've got the touch

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    I'm getting ready to start a new practice routine. Over the last year or two, I've slowly got away from practicing and writing, and want to get back into a routine again. The problem is I will have only about an hour a day to practice, and have a variety of things I want to focus on such as:

    Technique (Alternate Picking, Sweeping, Legator, etc)
    Thoery (I know the basics like scale and chord construction, but want to get a little more advanced)
    Composition Skills (More than just jamming around until I come up with something that sounds good)

    My big question is would it be better to focus on something different each day EX. - Monday - Technique, Tuesday - Music Theory, etc.

    Or would it be best to try and cram in everything into one day?

    Any thoughts?
     
  2. dedsouth333

    dedsouth333 That one dude...

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    I'd like to see what comes out of this thread personally. As I'm in a somewhat similar boat, I'd like to get into something like this myself. A guitar "work out routine" I guess.
     
  3. Solodini

    Solodini MORE RESTS!

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    There are ways to work all of those within the one session without cramming and sacrificing your practise. If you have a theoretical idea you want to work with, map something out and adjust it consciously until you have a decent sounding basis. Then apply a technique to it to see how suitable that is. If it's not very suitable, adjust until it is. You can then try to expand the idea you have written so you are working with a variation on the theoretical idea, using your compositional skills to continue the idea's journey and there's now a new exercise of the technical study to work with.
     
  4. Maniacal

    Maniacal SS.org Regular

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    Whilst I do agree with Solodini, it really depends how good you want your technique/neck knowledge/phrasing to be. It also depends how good you are now.

    In my opinion, 1 hour is not enough time to push your technique, work on timing, learn chords/scales/arpeggio inversions/phrases/riffs AND write music.

    There are plenty of academic practices you can do away from the guitar. Studying theory/neck diagrams/ear training. Therefore, if possible, try to spend time outside of your 1 hour working on those. That way you can focus more on pushing your technique.

    It took me years of alternate picking 2 hours most days to get it to a reasonable level, 1 hour in total would have never worked for me. Maybe I am not a gifted or natural as others on this forum.
     
  5. TheDivineWing22

    TheDivineWing22 You've got the touch

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    Technique is actually lower on my priority list. I've been playing for nearly 8 years now, I'm mostly just making things a little tighter in my technique.

    The thing I'm trying to do is get back into a routine. I think once that starts, the techinique will come back to where is was when I slowed down in my practicing. I also think that the amount of time will increase eventually as well, however, in the meantime I'm just trying to slowly get back into the routine of everyday practicing.

    Finishing college and getting a job really got my out of whack.
     
  6. Osorio

    Osorio SS.org Regular

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    Elitist advice ahoy:

    I would (and did) concentrate on Theory first. Get a stronger understanding of what it is that harmony and melodic and rhythm can do. Then you can write etudes for each piece of theory you learn (something that is VERY productive and can create very nice results). I advice you to learn how to read and write standard notation, because that frees you up to study when you don't have your instrument around with you.

    Try to compose everyday.

    Personally, I would push technique WAY down the priority list and focus on being able to write GOOD stuff before being able to play HARD stuff. But that is just me.
     
    Solodini likes this.
  7. dedsouth333

    dedsouth333 That one dude...

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    ^this is what I'm trying to get at. I'm not really interested in playing hard covers as much as picking up on my theory where I left off like 14 years ago. I started with an awesome teacher and he tried hard to teach me theory above all but I was 13 and just wanted to play Metallica :lol:

    I just want to be able to compose better stuff. I suppose I'll do a good search and see what I can come up with for free (cause I'm a broke ass lol).

    Edit: I really am sorry about hijacking the thread but I really want to learn some new things (and relearn some things I've forgotten). I couldn't decide whether it would be worse to try and jump in on an already existing one or create a new one asking basically the same thing.
     

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