Neck length Advantages?

Discussion in 'Beginners/FAQ' started by BIGRIGG, Jan 23, 2011.

  1. BIGRIGG

    BIGRIGG SS.org Regular

    Messages:
    190
    Likes Received:
    112
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2008
    Location:
    Guelph
    hey all,
    do you believe a scale longer than 25.5 is a bonus if you don't intend do do any drop tuning? Just a standard B string for seventh string. Any advantage to the 27" etc without the lower tunings?
    Thanks very much for any help.
     
  2. Winspear

    Winspear Tom Winspear

    Messages:
    11,463
    Likes Received:
    2,166
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2009
    Location:
    Yorkshire, U.K
    I believe it is definately an advantage for any 7 string. The tone would be improved slightly and you would be able to use a few gauges smaller for the same tension as 25.5".
    Despite what some people may say, I can't see that chords would be any more difficult to fret (it's only 'one fret lower' in terms of fret size increase). I also think lead work benefits slightly from the increase as well because I hate playing on the high frets.
     
  3. Dead Undead

    Dead Undead New again

    Messages:
    2,241
    Likes Received:
    89
    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2011
    Location:
    Georgia
    Wider spacing between the high frets can be quite advantageous. Longer scale also helps with intonation, and it adds more tension to the strings. I've heard people say that an extended scale guitar can make .09's feel like .10's
     
  4. BIGRIGG

    BIGRIGG SS.org Regular

    Messages:
    190
    Likes Received:
    112
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2008
    Location:
    Guelph
    Great help guys. Much appreciated. Any other info? Thanks.
     
  5. Skanky

    Skanky SS.org Regular

    Messages:
    519
    Likes Received:
    85
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2009
    Location:
    Kentucky


    Like a previous poster said, the wider spacing at the higher frets is a real advantage. I used to play a 25.5", and now when I go back to it I wonder how in the world ANYONE could play something with that scale - the frets just seem so damn crowded when you get above the 15th fret.
     
  6. SirMyghin

    SirMyghin The Dirt Guy Contributor

    Messages:
    7,874
    Likes Received:
    600
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2010
    Location:
    Anywhere but here.
    I just bought a 27.5" scaler with a floyd. I tune to Standard, BEADGBE. The builder recommended it. It will be nice to string with pretty average strings (thinking 9-42 +50, either way my usual brand sells that individually).

    The thing about scale length is mostly clarity and action. Shorter scale lengths will have less clarity, and you will have to pussy foot around the B a bit to make sure it doesn't flub out. Or use extremely heavy strings (which may not be readily buyable), which cost you action to use.

    Longer scale will let you use a regular string (which may cost less and be readily available) and have pretty normal action on it. The longer string will be tighter yes, but it will be clearer and more articulate, and you don't have to worry about ripping into it.

    "More room at higher frets" is pretty minor, but every bit helps. Some people may have trouble with stretches at first but that is short lived if you stretch out well. I am a bassist, so I have no stigma at all of going between scales. I have played 25, 25.5 (my favourite so far for guitar) , 32 (short scale bass) and 34" instruments.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.