Multiple peices of wodd for neck construction?

Discussion in 'Sevenstring Guitars' started by Digital Black, Aug 23, 2004.

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  1. Digital Black

    Digital Black SS.org Regular

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    i saw a guitar with a five peice neck. It had two bubunga strips offcenter rather than one up the middle. Is one or two/three better than four or more as far as neck construction for a bolt on?
     
  2. No Soul

    No Soul bringer of mosh

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    To the best of my knowledge it all boils down to the quality of the wood, and using multipile pieces (ie bubinga reinforcement) is way to lower production costs because its cheaper than finding just a single piece of wood that has the integrity to be used alone.
     
  3. Jim Soloway

    Jim Soloway Soloway Guitars

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    No. The cost of laminating multiple pieces vertically for a neck far outways the cost of the wood for a single piece neck. We offer both one piece and three piece necks and the three piece neck is priced as a significant upgrade. The three piece has a quarter sawn inner section and flat sawn outer sections. The cross grains make it incredibly rigid which results in improved sustain and a sweeter high end.
     
  4. Digital Black

    Digital Black SS.org Regular

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    So essentially, a five peice would be better if done right?.....
     
  5. Jim Soloway

    Jim Soloway Soloway Guitars

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    You start to get into dimishing return pretty quickly. Most of the benifits of laminating a neck can be gained in a 3 piece those with opposing grains. Beyond that, I think the cost doesn't really justify the benefit. Done right, a 5 piece can be VERY expensive and the process can be prone to errors. I've only ever owned one and it was on a high end proto type by a company that never went into production. It was unbelievably stiff. It was on a laminated archtop and the 5 ply neck made it the most lively laminate I'd ever played. The trick is that it has to be done right with a minimum of glue and very careful construction.
     
  6. Digital Black

    Digital Black SS.org Regular

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    Interesting..

    Thanks!.....
     
  7. Jerich

    Jerich Contributor

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    I have two carvins with 5 piece lam's and have no issues with them and I feel they sustain a lot longer then my single piece or three piece ones..explain that? Maple,Mahogony,Ash... :lol: I think on a acoustic it is a waste of time to do but on an electric it's only natural....
     
  8. No Soul

    No Soul bringer of mosh

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    thanks for the info Jim!
    I trust yours better than the source of my original statement.
    Im always happy to be humbled by the truly knowledgable.
     
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