mixing scales

Discussion in 'Music Theory, Lessons & Techniques' started by coregod, Nov 21, 2021.

  1. coregod

    coregod SS.org Regular

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    been learning music theory lately, I play Drop A so learned the A minor scale. I see a lot of things I can do with A minor to change the sound, hirajoshi scale which is pretty much a minor pentatonic, I sometimes add in the G# for harmonic minor sounds, then I found the diminished arpeggios in harmonic minor, today I learned A Dorian by learning the sailor moon theme and it’s only one note different than most of the other stuff I mentioned. would writing riffs with all these components in a few bars be too much ? can I switch modes more often when staying in the key of A?
     
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  2. gnoll

    gnoll SS.org Regular

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    It doesn't matter. If it sounds good it is good.
     
  3. DudeManBrother

    DudeManBrother Hey...how did everybody get in my room?

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    You can do whatever you want. Theory is essentially giving names to musical expressions. You would call it a parallel modal shift; that’s when you play different modes over the same root note. If you, playing in A Minor, decided to apply the Dorian mode starting on D: then it would just be a modal shift, as it’s in the same key of C Maj/A Min.
     
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  4. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    Yes you can. I can't tell you if it sounds good until I hear it, but it could be a cool idea.

    Melodic minor, for example, is two different scales.
     
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  5. Siggevaio

    Siggevaio SS.org Regular

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    The less complicated/specific chords You're playing over the more freedom you have regarding what scales/notes you use.

    Try to play over a vamp in A and see how different notes and scales sound over it. Experiment as much as possible.
     
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  6. wheresthefbomb

    wheresthefbomb SS.org Regular

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    ^ ^ ^
     
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  7. Hollowway

    Hollowway Extended Ranger

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    Shoot, I’ll go so far as to say it doesn’t even have to sound good. Sometimes people measure awesomeness by the sheer craziness of the passage. I say do it! The only rule is there are no rules.
     
  8. HungryGuitarStudent

    HungryGuitarStudent SS.org Regular

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    Is this an academic exercise? If not, use your ear?

    Is your goal to explore theoretical concepts (parallel modes, modal progressions, etc.)?

    Personally, I'm not a fan of theory as a prescriptive tool to compose, but if it helps you get unstuck in your composition process by generating ideas to test, then go for it. You do you :)
     
    Last edited: Nov 23, 2021 at 7:03 AM
  9. Pyramid Gallery

    Pyramid Gallery ss.org Irregular

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    I find this to be very relevant. I want freedom to play whatever, but I don't want it to sound like shit.

    Hmmm... well, the more different stuff you cram into one sequence, the more chromatic/chaotic it will sound. Only you may determine if it sounds like shit or not. I guess the only rule of thumb is: experimentation.

    I like to mix dorian, harmonic dorian (same key), and lydian (diff key), when doing scale runs. Don't forget key changes: minor chords/scales an aug 4th/dim 5th apart gives that awesome gothic horror sound (think intro to Sepultura's Beneath the remains or Kreator's Coma of Souls
     
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  10. coregod

    coregod SS.org Regular

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    im trying to get a certain sound but most of the scales ive heard and learned didnt have that X factor im looking for so i thought that trying different sounds and mixing similar scales together might be helpful
     
  11. Drew

    Drew Forum MVP

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    Speaking personally... I've usually had better luck writing a progression or series of chord changes, and then figuring out what was going on harmonically, than I have sitting down and thinking, "Ok, I'm going to write in A Dorian for two bars, then A Phrygian Dominant for two bars, and then four bars of A Mixolydian."

    It's not that theory doesn't matter - far from it - so much as once you have something that sounds good, theory is useful to figure out WHY that is, so you can play over it.
     
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  12. j3ps3

    j3ps3 SS.org Regular

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    This. Chord progressions convey emotion better than a certain scale and people should pay more attention to those progressions instead of the scales, IMO.
    I mean, it's good to know your scales but people get too caught up on just thinking about scales and it makes the playing sound less musical.
     

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