Master's Degree

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by NeubyWanKaneuby, Feb 24, 2015.

  1. NeubyWanKaneuby

    NeubyWanKaneuby SS.org Regular

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    Nice. I'm definitely skipping the doctorate. I have other work-related education stuff I have to do next.
     
  2. djyngwie

    djyngwie SS.org Regular

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    Indeed :wavey:
     
  3. JSanta

    JSanta SS.org Regular

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    With my military background and what I see myself doing 15-20 years from now, it just makes sense to get it done. I don't want to go back to school when I have children. My wife is also back in school doing a combined MS/PhD in Nursing. We figure the ROI made enough sense to get it all done.

    Never say never, but if it is something you're considering, do it sooner rather than later.
     
  4. Sumsar

    Sumsar SS.org Regular

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    Well I guess SSO is not the worst place to run into people you know haha.

    So going on about the subject of education / work - would you recommend becoming a high-school teacher? particularly teaching in physics .. in denmark?
     
  5. djyngwie

    djyngwie SS.org Regular

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    If you find a good place (like I have) it's all right, at least at the moment. As you probably know, the political climate seems to distrust teachers in general, so who knows what will happen in the future?

    But the pay is ok and the hours are flexible (this may not be the case at all schools). I must add, that for me, my math minor is as important (if not more so) for bringing home the bacon: I probably would not keep the job teaching physics alone (which is fine by me; I probably enjoy the math more overall, actually). I'm not sure that's representative of the situation at most places.
     
  6. Sumsar

    Sumsar SS.org Regular

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    And bringing home the bacon is in the end what this thread is all about!

    I don't have a math minor, I think a computer science minor would be closer, but then again it would take about the same time as a PhD as I would have to get a real job to do the minor, as when I hand in my thesis I will be out of free goverment funding! Oh cruel fate! :(

    Besides I don't even think most schools teach computer science to kids even though it should be mandatory!
     
  7. Murdstone

    Murdstone Sycamore Trees

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    I'm starting graduate school this fall to achieve my PhD, my focus will likely be structural biochemistry/chemical biology.
     
  8. Shimme

    Shimme Wants a Seven String

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    Sophomore psych student hoping to get into research. With anything Psych related you really need a Master's at minimum, but I may just end up staying in school and getting my doctorate.

    Needless to say, this is an insanely long time commitment.
     
  9. coffeeflush

    coffeeflush Well-Known Member

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    I quit my job as a civil engineer because I was doing all the managers work without the pay or credit for it. After working 12 hours a day and 7 days a week for almost a 15 months I quit my job due to burnout.

    Instead of looking for another one though, I am getting back into studies for my masters.

    Hopefully it will mean better pay and jobs and not more loans without better oppurtunities
     
  10. JSanta

    JSanta SS.org Regular

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    But it's an investment in yourself, and that will payoff in the long term. One of my really good friends got his PhD in Economics from Cornell and he's really enjoying being a professor and doing research.

    To me, the difficulties are worth it.
     
  11. vansinn

    vansinn SS.org Regular

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    I've come to look more balanced at the education mechanism over the latter years.
    I didn't do gymnasium (high school), so no university, which I later had deep regrets on. (I do have technical education, though)

    As a result, when my youngest daughter moved in here short-term (wow, 9 years ago), I sortof made demands that she either did gymnasium or the other [uni]qualifying program, which made her pick up her stuff and walk out with the words "thank you so much for your support in what I want with my life!". Didn't see her for the next three years.

    Point taken: She's now 25, works free-lance as a multi artist, runs alternative projects, is starting to represent artists, has lived in a cash-paid fully restored 36' boat, and now has her own house.
    No formal education, all self-learned, and via some very hard work. Owes not a single dime to the banks!

    And my own point: Of course a good formal higher education is super - and I love knowledge - but building it up all by yourself can take you places the formalized world cannot.

    Back in the days, I met several skydive instructors in Florida who had university stamps, but had chosen to rip the cord and doing what they loved the most.

    Marc Faber, internationally known investor and trader, said in an interview that he cares less about exactly which formal education someone has, than what this person is capable of delivering.
    In the world of IT, I've met totally brilliant, well-educated engineers, as well as many with degrees and certificates who simply couldn't deliver.

    It goes both ways, and there's no right or wrong, only your own ideas, motivation and drive.
     
  12. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    The level of education on SS.O has always impressed me. It's nearly on par with some of the science forums I used to frequent.
     
  13. Sumsar

    Sumsar SS.org Regular

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    Yeah I think the whole parent idea of "my kids will do what I tell them" is very outdated - kids are willing to go very far just to not obey their parents these days - if that means not getting an education because that's what your parents are trying to force you to do, then so be it.

    Also yeah University is not for everyone, even though politicians here in Denmark want like 60% of the (young part of) population to have a degree of some sort.
     
  14. TeeBag

    TeeBag SS.org Regular

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    finished my JD about a year ago. It was hell.

    I currently work somewhere that isn't very stressful so life is good now. But we are in a frothy market right now, so crossing my fingers I don't get "lathamed."
     
  15. Underworld

    Underworld SS.org Regular

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    More studies do not always equal better working conditions and salary. There are a lot of over-educated worker where I love (education is almost free tho).

    I've got a friend who is a biomedic technician... as she earns MORE than people having master degrees in the same lab. Why? they need technicians, not masters.

    I do have a master degree in french civil law... 40k per year yay... It is hard to find jobs when businesses don't want to hire you because you are over-educated (and therefore "worth" more). Hell, a lot of my friends work 60k+ jobs with little study. They have been doing so for the last 6-7 years, when I've been accumulating school bills...
     
  16. Captain Butterscotch

    Captain Butterscotch SS.org Regular

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    Hah, I'm going to be a teacher, so I'm okay with the idea of being strapped for cash. :lol: I do intend to get my Master's when I finish.
     
  17. vansinn

    vansinn SS.org Regular

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    ERG players are soul searching tech whiz aspiring geeks with non-subtle desires..
     
  18. TeeBag

    TeeBag SS.org Regular

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    Agree. Education is overrated in our day and age of free information.

    Although I am well compensated now, I spent three years without working and student loans (that I have to pay off) to get where I am now. I keep thinking that if I would have taken a risk and started my own business or saved and bought income properties I could be in a better position than I am now.
     
  19. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    I agree whole hearted that higher education is not for everyone; however, I have a bone to pick with your post (not with you personally).

    This post-modern philosophy of "it's on the internet, why do I need to study" is wrong. As a college instructor, I saw too many young men try to use this philosophy and fail because of it. Just because you can look something up does not mean that you will understand it.

    Also, long before there was household internet availability, people bought encyclopediae. I guarantee that the accuracy of information in Funk & Wagnalls was equal to or better than the accuracy of information on wikipedia, even if it was not quite as encompassing. Plus, there were libraries, which had tons of books. People didn't say "I don't need education, since there is a public library and I own a set of encyclopedia."

    Nobody seriously picked up an encyclopedia and learned how to invent the mobile telephone - nobody went to the library and learned how to build an electric car or a hydrogen fuel cell. So far, I've only heard one news story about a kid in Africa who learned how to build a wind powered water pump from reading about it on wikipedia, but I think that there was more to the story that we didn't hear. Anyway, it would be foolish to expect that the next generation of doctors, scientists, and engineers will be better trained by independent study off the internet than by proper schooling.

    Maybe that's not at all where you were going with what you said, but I've heard the sentiment stated all too often by twenty-somethings all over the USA.
     
  20. ThePhilosopher

    ThePhilosopher Reason User

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    :scratch:
    I believe more law readers that attempt their Bar Exams fail than those that attend law school.

    I can read a lot of information about applied statistics online, but they are in no way comprehensive or put together in way that would make it easy to acquire a working knowledge of this information. I'm sure there are many fields where this holds true.

    The value of formal education is information is in the hands of professionals who know how to organize and disseminate information as well as design assessments for the usage of this information as it applies to the real-world (perhaps this is more true in graduate/professional school than undergrad).
     

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