Is there still a preference for thin necks in metal? (Ibanez content)

Discussion in 'Standard Guitars' started by profwoot, Nov 17, 2021.

  1. profwoot

    profwoot SS.org Regular

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    Just thought I'd take the temperature on this issue. I still occasionally see folks hyping up shredder-type necks, and talking about "baseball bat" necks in a somewhat negative way, but seemingly less than I used to. And just paying attention to guitars being released lately, presumably if Ibanez's ultra wizard thing were really so desirable other companies would do it too?

    I ask because I just bought an RG6UCS, which is one I've semi-coveted for ages. This will be the first Ibanez/Floyd I've played since my first two electrics back in the 90s, a Charvel Model 4* followed by an RG470. Gratuitous pic:
    [​IMG]


    It's become more rare of late, and I hesitated in previous opportunities due to how thin the neck is. But one just came up on reverb, and, toward the end of a very long semester, I snagged it. The aftermaths have been swapped out, which presumably contributed to my getting a good deal, and I already have some Ragnaroks that need a new home. Plus it's currently loaded with DMZ X2N/Liquifire, which will be fun to try.

    How nervous should I be about the Ultra Wizard HP Prestige neck? 17/19mm is thinner than I've played in a long time, and my hands are both large and at this point chronically somewhat less than healthy.

    *The Charvel was super cheap back then; I now realize it was a sweet guitar but at the time I mostly couldn't wait to get rid of it because it was a very bold metallic pink and let's just say it was a different time re the color pink, at least where I grew up.
     
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  2. Adieu

    Adieu SS.org Regular

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    Gdam son, that thing gets DOUBLE bonus points if it is bold pink

    Same with Ibanez btw
     
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  3. steinmetzify

    steinmetzify CHUG & SLUDGE

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    You’ll get used to it and dig it.

    My main guitar is an ESP SS Viper or Eclipse; my backup is an RGA121 and it slays hard.

    Spend enough time and you’ll adapt.
     
  4. MaxOfMetal

    MaxOfMetal Likes trem wankery. Super Moderator

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    You have to realize, even the "thick" necks we find on guitars aimed at the metal crowd (various ESP/LTD, Ibanez, Schecter, etc.) are thinner than the typical Les Paul/Strat/Tele which make up the overwhelming majority of guitars out there.

    I do think the days of companies battling to see who can make the thinnest neck have been long over.
     
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  5. jl-austin

    jl-austin SS.org Regular

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    It does seem like the market is moving away from the wizard style neck to a more traditional style neck. Even Ibanez latest releases aren't wizard style.

    I think the RG recipe will remain though. We just see Ibanez moving away from that somewhat with other models.
     
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  6. profwoot

    profwoot SS.org Regular

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    Yeah my 95 LP Studio is 21.84/25.4mm (1st/12th) whereas my 4 metal guitars + 2007 deluxe strat are all in the 19-20.5/20-21.5mm range.
     
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  7. Loomer

    Loomer Comfortably Dumb

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    I think you're right about the proverbial "arms race" of thin necks is over, at least in terms of how companies promote things. And you're also right about the proportionality, compared to the more old-school designs.

    In terms of thin necks, I was also sort of put off from thin six-string necks in my younger days, from owning an RG1570 for a while and damned near cramping up from playing it. However, as years went on and I became more capable in terms of technique, despite being a great combination of lazy, self-taught and sort of an idiot, I grew to love them. My favourite neck right now is probably the Ultra Wizard, that Ibanez kindly decided to bring back fully with the new Genesis series. Marvelous things!

    Also, for super-duper thin necks and getting into them, I feel like Jacksons would be a good place to start, due to the compound radius fretboards.
     
  8. HoneyNut

    HoneyNut Regular

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    I want a RG750 with a comfier neck and AANJ. And 760 and 770.

    That RGUC is really nice. I'd have installed It black/pink zebra pickups on it.
     
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  9. bracky

    bracky Contributor

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    My first guitar was a rg760. What a neck on that one.
     
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  10. soliloquy

    soliloquy SS.org Regular

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    As indicated above, I believe that metal guitars, as a whole, seemingly moreso now than before, and also shying away from the pointy/shreddy stuff and going more towards the classier/timeless side via PRS, Gibson, Shecter, ESP/LTD and Ibanez kind of things. Sure, super thin necks may still exist, but seemingly less.
     
  11. Millul

    Millul SS.org Regular

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    Wait a minute - what's an Ultra Wizard?? I know the Ultra, but...Ultra Wizard??
     
  12. MaxOfMetal

    MaxOfMetal Likes trem wankery. Super Moderator

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    I believe he means Super Wizard, which replaced the regular Wizard models in the late 90's and early 00's on the higher end models, and right before the Ultra started showing up.

    They're typically the same overall dimensions as the early Wizard (~17mm to ~19/20mm depending on model) but laminate construction.
     
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  13. Millul

    Millul SS.org Regular

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    Ok, now it makes sense!
    I really wish Ibanez would bring the Ultra back in a Prestige RG - that, I'd buy!
     
  14. Loomer

    Loomer Comfortably Dumb

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    Exactly. My mistake. I've had the original Wizard on a guitar I still miss to this day, but the Super Wizard on the Genesis series is damned close to it in terms of feel.

    No idea where the "Ultra" bit came from tbh. My brain had some crossed wires
     
  15. elkoki

    elkoki SS.org Regular

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    I had an RG1570 with a Super Wizard, it's literally the thinnest neck i've ever played on any guitar...ever... They are a tad thinner than the Wizard II's. No complaints, I can get used to just about any neck over time, I generally prefer a non glossed neck but everything else about a neck shape I can get used to eventually. For some it's not comfortable and that's really something you'll have to see for yourself
     
  16. CanserDYI

    CanserDYI 5150 KVLT

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    Skinny necks absolutely destroy my hand.
     
  17. gclef

    gclef SS.org Regular

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    I started on large necks (my first 3) the 4th was an rg520 with the super wizard in '99
    I loved the guitar but the neck didn't fit with the gorilla grip i had back then.

    By 2016 i had 2 more RGs, and a bit better time with the wizard 3 and wizard premium profiles, both being thicker.

    The lockdown allowed me to woodshed like i haven't done since the turn of the century. I focused on relaxed grip and light playing. That was all it took!
    Now, my shred necks Feel the most comfortable for me, and i can play them for as long as i do my fat necked guitars.
     
  18. nickgray

    nickgray SS.org Regular

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    9-42s, very low action. In principle, you don't even need the thumb, you can play with ultra light touch without any pressure from the thumb, it's just that it's awkward as hell, of course.

    I dunno, I've never had an actual thick neck (like on a Gibson or a Fender, I remember trying them in a shop once and they were comically thick), but the "metal thick" necks are not as comfortable for me, I think. The main issue that when you play 5ths or power chords on the low notes you kinda curl your hand, and this is where thickness becomes a problem - it's more awkward to do when there's more material. In principle, thick necks sound like a good idea for chords, but in practice you really don't need a lot of pressure from your thumb, most of the force should come from your arm, and with low action and low tension the force needed is quite small. I also think flat profiles are better because there's more surface area for your thumb to grip on, with rounder necks the pressure on the thumb will be spread over a smaller area.

    In any case, all of that is pointless since we all have different hands, playing styles, preferences, and habits. It doesn't really matter what any dude from the internet says, this is definitely one of those things that you should try for yourself.
     
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  19. steinmetzify

    steinmetzify CHUG & SLUDGE

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    Took my RGA121 to my buddy’s house for the last jam/ampfest and he’s a dyed in the wool ESP fanatic.

    He played that thing for like 20 minutes and was sort of shocked. He really dug it. It took me a minute being a dyed in the wool ESP/Gibson guy but I really like it as well, and this is the 3rd one I’ve had.

    I think the older I get and the better I get the less the neck matters.
     
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  20. Giest

    Giest Redneck Rube

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    While everyone's hands are different I will say that thin profile necks can be uncomfortable if you don't apply proper traditional technique, and thin width necks can hinder cleanliness if again you don't apply proper traditional technique. I find shredding on a thin profile neck to be easier and offers more leverage while freeing the forearm a bit, but Ibby necks tend to also be thinner in width which asks more of me when it comes to clean bends and other inflections used mostly in phrasing from the wrist. So certainly there's that old adage, a good musician can make any instrument sound good, but personal paths of least resistance are a complex consideration when it comes to instruments. I think you see a lot of "middle of the road" profile necks from other makers trying to effectively split the difference as to entice the largest segment of the market.
     

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