How to make learning fun!?

Cheesebuiscut

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So a little while back I decided its up and time to take lessons and learn all the things I didn't by self teaching.

So when I went to my teacher he had no idea how to teach me, he hadn't encountered someone who could play intermediate stuff but didn't know his basics. So he was trying to figure out a way to start me from the ground up without boring me to death and having me lose interest, unfortunately that's exactly what happened.

I still really want to learn all these chords / scales etc etc, I just have a ton of trouble finding a way to keep interested for long enough to get this stuff down and start using it to make music.

So I was wondering if you guys had any routines or ideas that you use to make it fun for you that I might try.
 

Mr. Big Noodles

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Suck it up, princess.

Honestly, though, if you stay in your comfort zone, you'll never advance. Go through the lessons and exercises on this website until you have no problem comprehending any of it:

Ricci Adams' Musictheory.net

Learn your chords. Or, better yet, learn how to construct chords. Once again, the above link helps. Find some sheet music of some fairly easy songs that you can just sightread and strum along to (stuff along these lines: page 1, page 2), get a copy of the Real Book or some other fake books (PM me and I'll hook you up), and just try to figure stuff out. As for scales... son! Ricci Adams' Musictheory.net
 

Solodini

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Have a look at the sample chapters of my book (linked in my sig). You're exactly the sort of person I wrote it for. Very little time is spent on discussing the theory: it's explained and then you learn it by using it and putting it in to practise creatively.

Have a go and let me know what you think/if you encounter any difficulties. :)
 

Grimbold

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yeah

i tried out solodini's book

made me SOOO MUCH BETTER in like.. 4 days

im going to have to buy a physical copy for my future students!
 

Cheesebuiscut

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Suck it up, princess.

I'm at that point, I'm just trying to see if there's a way to make it fun at the same time. Is a difficult thing to do xD

I've already taken 4 semesters of theory now (which is all the school I go to does) so I have an understanding of a lot of what that site is showing.

Its more applying it to guitar, I'm fine with it on paper but putting it to the instrument is a completely different story.
 

Maniacal

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Why does everything have to be fun to be worthwhile?

If you really want to improve, you should be able to motivate yourself to tolerate the banal world of practice.
 

Maniacal

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Record a video of you playing some of your exercises with a big smile on your face and I might be convinced.

Seriously though, subdivisions, scales, chords, technique are rarely fun. If you have found a way to make practicing them fun and productive, then I must buy your book.

The sample pages were of no use to me, I would be very interested in seeing some exercises in action.
 

Solodini

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My post was intended to respond to the OP, in regard to applying theory to the guitar. Playing up and down scales isn't fun, but there's more to practising theory than that. Using it to create music will help in the process of internalising as it creates a frame of reference and a melody to remember it by.
 

Cheesebuiscut

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I downloaded the sample and skimmed it but I had to skip the first 38~Ish? pages and then had to run so I haven't gotten a chance to get to trying it out.


@maniacal: Its not that it HAS to be fun, but the grind of learning everything before was fun to me. Learning all the different techniques etc through covers wasn't like I just picked up the guitar and could sweep pick etc. I had to sit there and grind and grind and grind but I had fun doing so for no good reason.

For some reason I don't find that same fun in scales etc. I think a lot of it because I'm trying to do this to improve my writing abilities and even after learning a scale up and down I still have trouble wrapping my head around using it musically.

I think its just I haven't ever gotten familiar enough with any scales to know what every note sounds like and how the different intervals work together, but its proving quite the task to get there.


Ultimately I intend to do as schecterwhore said and just suck it up and get to work, but since that's proved a challenge with the whole A.D.H.D. where if it doesn't have my interest it loses my attention very quickly I wanted to see if anyone might have some solutions to make it feel less like work.

Why does that have to be hard to understand? Why can't something be fun and worthwhile?
 

Solodini

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I understand where you're coming from. If it's something you do for the love of it then there should be some element of enjoyment. Yes, you'll need to work at things but there are ways to minimise the drudge and reach the fun faster.
 


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