How far do you think djent will evolve?

Discussion in 'General Music Discussion' started by Jahka, Mar 10, 2015.

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  1. The Omega Cluster

    The Omega Cluster n00b

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    A genre is just that. A group of similar-sounding musics.
     
  2. asher

    asher So Did We

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    Yeah, and this has been true for years.
     
  3. 7soundz

    7soundz SS.org Regular

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    I'd give it another 3-5 years before everyone gets tired of it. "Djent" is amazingly uninspiring. It's just a lot of technical noise that serves no purpose other than to showcase technical ability. Having technical ability is great, but it should be balanced and I don't get the impression that too many artist are versed enough on their instrument to be balanced.
    I am by no means the greatest guitar player, but I find that focusing on one one ability or specific sound in a piece of music to be pointless. If your goal is to create music that can stand the test of time and to progress as an artist, you should be more diverse.

    It's like shred guitar for example, in the 80s, shred was just fast playing when you had nothing else musically interesting to "say". When used appropriately, it added dynamics to a song. When newer guitar players started writing full songs that contained nothing but shred, guitar playing was all about whose the fastest and not about who can compose a moving piece of music. With "Djent" the ability to play technical riffs is great, but it shouldn't be the primary focus of a song or an entire album. After a while you will quickly loose the motivation and the inspiration to create something unique. I think this may have been one of the reasons Periphery moved away from the style of their first album.

    That's just my opinion....
     
  4. ncfiala

    ncfiala Silence you bastard

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    Djent will not and can not "evolve." For something to evolve there must be variation. But djent all sounds the same (terrible).
     
  5. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    As a product of the 80's, it pains me to see this thread devolve into shred bashing.

    Personally, I think guys like Yngwie, Kotzen, Vai, and even Satch play with tons of feeling. When people say that their music has no emotion in it, and I challenge those people to name a player who played with tons of feeling, they usually list Clapton, Page, Hendrix, etc. If you rewind to 1970, you could have exactly the same conversation, though, except Clapton, Page, and Hendrix would suddenly be the guys who were just making a lot of noises, and the real guitar players who played with emotion would then be Charlie Christian and Django Reinhardt.

    They are all excellent players.

    If the feeling of something doesn't speak to you, you know what, that's too bad, but it doesn't mean that there is no feeling in it, it just means that it doesn't speak to you. If it speaks to a crowd of kids somewhere, then objectively, there is probably some feeling to it. Maybe the emotion coming across is prentious or snotty, or whatever, but it exists, and it is obviously valued differently by different people.

    It's too bad if you don't like shred, but it's not a religion or even a political party, so we aren't trying to cram it down your throat or anything, we're just trying to sharre something with you because it spoke to us, and we hope that you enjoy it.

    Now, if you are refering to some of the "cheap" shred artists, like DMAG, well, I'm certainly not going to defend that, but hey, evidently, that guy has some dedicated fans out there, so good on him for that, although I'm not into his revised history of the guitar. :lol:
     
  6. Kurkkuviipale

    Kurkkuviipale Another Sinking ....

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    ^this guy gets it
     
  7. 7soundz

    7soundz SS.org Regular

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    I would hardly call Satriani and Vai "shred" guitarist since shred is just fast playing and they used it tastefully. Others focused their entire style on fast playing through an entire song and "shred guitar" eventually died... The same may very well happen to Djent..
     
  8. JustMac

    JustMac ss not-so-regular

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    Why is it still 'the' trend in modern metal music? Last year's JFaC, Revocation and Fallujah were all fantastic but didn't seem to resonate with many outside of that established DM community. I think others (broader music community) look to modern metal and see, namely: Periphery; Tesseract and the new Contortionist; all of whom could be viewed as a very-well developed form of djent. It's cool do see the divergence that has occurred in each band's growth...drama/theatrical and top 40pop aspects with Periphery, vocal prowess and groove with Tesseract and ambience/atmosphere with the Contortionist. And is it good? Yup. Groundbreaking? Eh. Will it stand the test of time like seminal metal records like aJFa, British Steel, Symbolic, White Pony, Lateralus, Rust in Peace etc.? Hell to the no. And it's because, like so many of you have said, the songwriting is just not there. A lot of it isn't cohesive and it all seems a bit...disjointed.


    I can't guess what the next thing will be, but I would have thought that at this stage we're ready for it. I hope the upcoming BtBaM album in July does something to metal unseen before, as well as the new SikTh that's been promised. This TurboTechWankDjjjonT stuff has to end somewhere though.
     
  9. JohnIce

    JohnIce Singlecoil Enthusiast

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    Very good point :)

    As far as djent goes though it's unique in a timing sense. While all generations of players have new possibilities, new technology and gear etc., the djent generation is the first to have had high-speed internet and that's a HUGE difference to, let's say, a cutting edge fuzz pedal in the 70's.

    The thing I see is that it used to be that knowledge and experience kind of went hand in hand for musicians. You could take lessons if you could afford them, but probably no more than an hour a week and your teacher probably didn't know everything. So you learned mostly by doing, trying, and using your imagination and creativity. And thus progress was slow and you probably had to play for 10 years or so before you could really impress anybody. But by then, you had a rock-solid understanding of music and the instrument due to 10 years of experience with it, probably with a lot of songwriting done as well.

    Now, guitar players are learning maybe 10x faster thanks to youtube and google and guitar pro etc. but their knowledge increases disproportionally to their experience. Cause who takes time to figure something out yourself without googling it first? Hence: 15-year olds playing mind-blowing shred, note for note after maybe 2-3 years of playing. But, they lack the experience that we're all used to hearing from someone playing such difficult stuff. The development of taste, the deeper understanding of themselves that comes from a decade of figuring your shit out, is missing. They've never been bored with music, never lived with writer's block, never felt the crippling emptiness of thinking everything's been done and you're just aching to innovate but you don't know how. They just skipped over it :lol: Someone may definitely interpret this as lack of "feel". Not the word I'd use but I see the issue people are having with it all.
     
  10. CreptorStatus

    CreptorStatus SS.org Regular

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    No offense man but that's got to be one of the most silly comments i've read in a while. I can't imagine a time signature being "out" in metal, much less ANY genre of music.

    That's like saying "the C note is out man, everyone has played that note."
     
  11. DarkWolfXV

    DarkWolfXV Excised n anatomised

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    You're wrong. We've already went full circle and are experiencing a nu metal revival, right now.

     
  12. KristapsCoCoo

    KristapsCoCoo SS.org Regular

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    true! Even more so when most of 'djent' music, a lot of prog or any music that sounds 'weirdly timed' is played in 4/4 with unconventional accents, poly rhythms and other tricks to make it sound like that.
     
  13. Narrillnezzurh

    Narrillnezzurh Sir Clipsalot

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    Uhm, what? Sure, stuff like Periphery and Animals as Leaders might be intricate, but none of that comes from what makes it djenty. Quite the contrary, I'd argue djent is inherently simple. There's very little technical extravagance from the likes of Vildhjarta or Monuments, and even the polyrhythmic stuff Meshuggah pioneered isn't terribly difficult to play if you can wrap your head around it. Anup Sastry's stuff is as close to a quintessential djent sound as it gets in my opinion, and there isn't even a real guitar player behind any of it.

    Technical extravagance has never been the point of djent.
     
  14. Sikthness

    Sikthness SS.org Regular

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    All djent bands' range of sounds will converge into a singularity, sounding exactly like Periphery. Eventually, all djent musicians will collaborate on a nationwide album, calling themselves Djent and releasing their s/t debut, which will contain virtually no compelling new material.
     

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