How does this tone sound? + Mixing Question

Discussion in 'Recording Studio' started by Venza, Feb 13, 2016.

  1. Venza

    Venza SS.org Regular

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    I tried to make a tone through my Line6 POD500X (should've gottten that axe fx ii x_x). My first time making one since all the presets aren't really good for metal in my opinion. I just found a good amp and played with the settings. I didn't really know what I was doing. Well, except for cutting out the low end and trying to squeeze the tone out of it.

    https://youtu.be/7nQewpiecUk

    Note: I am aware that this is extremely basic but I just made it in like 30 minutes. Plus, I am not that amazing at guitar. I'm still learning.


    Also, question. When you're recording guitars, do you add effects like reverb, compression, delay, etc., just DI with no effects and add the effects within the DAW (like this) or or do you leave it in the effects chain and recording it directly (like this).

    Is there a general rule/guidelines to follow when setting up your effects chain?

    Thanks in advance!! :)
     
  2. Slaeyer

    Slaeyer SS.org Regular

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    First of all I have to say that I'm not a pro either, but also just started recording and mixing....

    I would always try to record the regular signal without any effects along with a separate DI-track.
    This way you can always tweak your effects in context of the whole mix. If the worst-case happens your basic amp sound does not fit in the mix you can just use the DI track for reamping.

    David
     
  3. Venza

    Venza SS.org Regular

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    That's actually pretty smart. Thanks for the tip!!
     
  4. torqueofficial

    torqueofficial Torque

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    Yeap, definitely record just DI with an amp sim and then do whatever you want with it later.
     
  5. Venza

    Venza SS.org Regular

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    Right. I use a Line6 PODHD500X so that acts as my audio interface, but if I didn't have that what would the DI setup look like

    My Setup: Guitar > PODHD > PC > Amp Modeler

    Another Setup: Guitar > Audio Interface > PC > Amp Modeler

    I actually saw that Misha's setup is like this: Guitar > Audio Interface > Axe FX II > PC > Amp Modeler

    Do I need a DI box? What does your set up look like?
     
  6. Jorock

    Jorock SS.org Regular

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    Its great to have a raw recording where you can adjust effects and other things later, if the guitar track has a very specific effect though, I like to play through that effect and commit to the sound, and record it that way.

    But for leads and rhythms I always keep it dry
     
  7. Ill-Gotten James

    Ill-Gotten James SS.org Regular

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    If you are one of those people who is never satisfied with their tone, or likes to experiment a lot with tone, consider recording DI into your interface. With this dry signal, as long as you are satisfied with your playing, the options are endless as to what your tone could be. You can also have the signal leaving your interface and routing directly into your POD and back into your interface onto another channel, giving you a dry channel and a wet channel.

    Next, always add effects later in the mix or later in the effects chain. With DAWs and the use of an effects processor, the effects chain does not matter as much, but still has some importance. Personally I always add my OD and compression before my amp sim when creating tones. I find it easier to add reverb, delay and additional eq-ing through the DAW after I have already recorded the track and am satisfied with the tone..
     
  8. shnizzle

    shnizzle johnny

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    for rhythm tones all you need is gate - stomp - amp. that´s it. i get my best tones
    with that simple setup. the more complicated it gets the more potential trouble you´re
    making for yourself. that graphic EQ is more of a pre-EQ than post EQ shaping. i´d rather
    use either the parametric EQ or the studio EQ for that. and why do you turn everything
    down with that graphic EQ? doesn´t make any sense to me. seems like you set the amp
    EQ badly and picked a bad cab/mic combo to go with it. now that i look more closely
    you turned litterally EVERY knob down. do you want to hide the real settings or what´s
    going on here? there are a bunch of tutorials on YouTube that can help you start out.

    and if i may, when you say yourself you don´t realy know what you´re doing than please
    don´t say you should´ve gotten the Axe-Fx. you would run into exactly the same
    problem with it when you simply don´t know yet how to make good use of it.
    the Pod HD models make killer tones when you know what you´re doing. and the only
    way to know is by fiddling around a lot. test out every stomp, every amp, every cab,
    every mic combo until you start to understand how everything sounds and contributes to
    the tone.
     
  9. oc616

    oc616 Control Deck Wins

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    With Johnny here, the POD HD makes great sounding tones with know-how. Having used an Axe-FX Ultra before this, the Line 6 has a MUCH friendly UI and editing tools (bar that cursed EQ display on-unit).

    The tone I found the best is, as Johnny also suggested, fairly simple. I was doing things like amp splitting, multi-gates, pre EQ + post cab EQ, compressor etc. But in the end the tone I liked best was just a Noise>Screamer>Angel-F Ball 100>XXL V-30>Post EQ. He just finished a reamp for me yesterday and I'll be trying some of his suggestions after work tonight as there's likely an issue with how I'm recording DI signals due to clipping on the guitar itself. The 2nd tone he ended up with was quite nice.
     
  10. markerece

    markerece Active Member

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    I would like to quote this for emphasis. There are so many people out there that have axe fx's and put out tones that don't represent the 2k+ they're worth. I've also seen people with Pods that sound great, take Johnny, Monuments, and more.
     
  11. Josh Delikan

    Josh Delikan SS.org Regular

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    I record the DI signal, using a basic tone in the DAW as reference - for example, if I'm recording heavy rhythm guitars, I'll use one of the stock metal amp presets in EZMix, so I can get a rough idea of how it sounds in context. That way, when the recording process is over and it's time to mix, I can essentially start from scratch if I want to, without being limited by having recorded any kind of tone already. I think you'll find that most metal guys do it like this these days. It gives you the utmost flexibility.
     
  12. Cyanide_Anima

    Cyanide_Anima BLOOOOM!

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    30 minutes? Dayum. Takes me a lot longer to do a lot less. You're well on your way to getting the sounds you want. It's all about practice and experimentation.

    I like to record the tones out of the podhd's XLR out into the mixer and from there into the comp via usb. Some people do DI/Podfarm and perfect the tone. Some people do a combination of those approaches.

    I like to DI the bass and separate it into two tracks (via send/return), one for low end and the other for distortion/grit and to help it cut through the mix. Lately I've been using a Tubescreamer in front of the bass before doing splitting up the tracks, it cuts out some flub and adds a bit of heft. The drum sounds also really effect the perception of the guitar and bass tones. For all this stuff the less post EQ the better as it'l sound more natural and not so processed.

    Sometimes it sounds like the guitars are too bright but it may be the drums are too dark in comparison. Sometimes it's the other way around. In a mix everything is relative. I'm definitely not pro, though. Just spending a lot of time messing with things I find is the best way to learn audio stuff if you aren't going to an audio school. Eventually it become kind of intuitive.
     

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