Guitar tracks, how do you divide them?

Discussion in 'Recording Studio' started by OmegaSlayer, Aug 2, 2016.

  1. OmegaSlayer

    OmegaSlayer SS.org Regular

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    It's a month that I started recording stuff.
    I started with easier stuff and I'm progressively moving to much complex stuff...kind of going back and forth when I realize than I'm still not prepared to work on that stuff yet.
    So yeah, I took a peek at Children Of Bodom - Silent Night, Bodom Night and Angra - Carry On.




    While recording these 2 songs I found myself with a problem.
    Those tracks have both some guitar sections that are "hybrid"...
    They're kind of small leads played in between the rhythm section.
    What I was faced with is that, while the sound of the guitar works well during the chugging rhythm session, thight, with enough body and punchy, when I move to those small leads played on unwounded string...the sound becomes thin and...lifeless...no matter how much vibrato I try to apply to the notes (when possible), they keep feelin' unappealing.

    So I was wondering if it's a good idea to track a guitar (or 2 or whatever) for those small leads and not play them in the rhythm track.

    How do you guys deal with those situations?
     
  2. Josh Delikan

    Josh Delikan SS.org Regular

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    You could just record the "lead" parts on to new tracks, and level/EQ/pan them so that they hold their own (and fit in) with the main rhythm sound. :)
     
  3. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    If I were you, I would record a few tracks for rhythm and a separate track or two or three for lead.

    I typically dub in a rhythm sound with a MESA or similar, another with a Mashall sound, and then play around with whatever else I have lying around and then bus them all together into a stereo rhythm guitar track. For leads, I like to take a similar approach, but never with quite as many takes, and keep the lead guitar bus separate from the other buses until mixdown.

    So there's a sort of hierarchy:

    Mix
    * Lead Vocals Bus
    - Lead Vocals
    - Double Tracked Vocals
    * Lead Guitar Bus
    - Lead Guitar
    - Double Tracked Lead Guitar
    - Harmony 1
    - Harmony 2
    * Rhythm Guitar Bus
    - RG1 - Mesa 100% L
    - RG2 - Mesa 100% R
    - RG3 - Marshall 80% L
    - RG4 - Marshall 80% R
    - RG5 - Peavey 50% L
    - RG6 - Slo Clone 50% R
    - RG7 - Rockman/Crate/Roland C
    * Bass Bus
    - Bass
    - Double Tracked or Distorted Bass
    * Drum Bus
    - Bass Drum
    - Snare Drum
    - Hihat
    - OH Mic L
    - OH Mic R
    ....+whatever extra mics
    * Synth Bus
    - Synth 1 (usually I'll track my left hand and right hand independently, to make sure everything is tight)
    - Synth 2
     
  4. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    One track doesn't have to equal one guitar. If the lead-ish part sounds better on a different guitar, just punch in a take during those parts using the guitar that works for it, and edit them together.
     
  5. OmegaSlayer

    OmegaSlayer SS.org Regular

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    So you say to leave the same decibel output AND EQ...interesting, especially the bit about EQ.

    Just to make sure I understood, would you keep the "weak" guitar and add "stack" a "stronger" upon it, or erase the weak guitar anyway?


    I still have to learn to deal with bus/groups so far, but I've heard that it's a common way to work to add fx/EQ and so on.
    But your hyerarchy is very interesting and useful, thanks :)
     
  6. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    Nope, that's not at all what I was suggesting, but that might also achieve what you want.

    I guess you could call it that. I'm suggesting you punch in/out the same way you would if you were fixing a playing mistake, just do it with the other guitar. I'd assuming you're using Reaper or something similar? Just go back to the parts you want to use the other guitar for and hit record on the same track again. Reaper (and other programs, I would assume) will keep both takes on the same track, and you can cross-fade one into the other to make the edits sound more or less seamless- then just process it as if it was one guitar track the whole time.
     
  7. OmegaSlayer

    OmegaSlayer SS.org Regular

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    Using Cubase 5, but yeah, it works the same as reaper, still I suck at cutting in the middle of a bar.
    I usually play the song at least 2 or 3 times each guitar and select the good parts, then record again what isn't good in any recording...still, as I said, I only cut between 2 bars so far :lol:
     
  8. Slampop

    Slampop Artist/Producer: IDOLER

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    you can always double track the leads, shoot one 50% left and the other 50% right to start (or whatever u hear sounds good), send them to a stereo Lead bus in Cubase and then do a split pan there to dial them in even more (again, what sounds good to UR ears). Once you find the right panning for them to sit how u want, it's really just eq'ing them to sit better if it even needs it. Also, depends on your master compression settings and how its "glueing" the mix as a whole. You wanna find that perfect balance where ur overall mix keeps at relatively the same volume no matter the layers you have.:metal: Hope that helps dude :wavey:
     
  9. Chokey Chicken

    Chokey Chicken mouth breather

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    We frequently double track rhythm, lead and harmonies.

    We leave a lot more low frequencies in the rhythm track and cut the low frequencies from the leads/harmonies. This way you don't muddy up the lower register with too many guitar tracks. The lead tracks on their own sound very wimpy and thin, but when you turn the rhythm and, more importantly, the bass track it gets nice and beefy.

    So basically yeah... record your chunky rhythms seperate from your thinner sounding leads.
     
  10. OmegaSlayer

    OmegaSlayer SS.org Regular

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    Thanks for all the inputs :D
     
  11. Slampop

    Slampop Artist/Producer: IDOLER

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    almost forgot, a high or low pass filter on ur leads can also really help them stand out...all depends on the mix though. Ive cut lows and highs off my leads and had them really clear up and sound much richer and depthier, but other mixes where my leads fit better with all the low or high end due to having less low or high end in my rhythms. Its all about what works for ur sound u already have dialed in with ur rhythm instruments, ya know? Anyway...yea, play with low and high filters :hbang:
     

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