Gibson to resurrect Steinberger, including a new model in collaboration with Ned Steinberger

Andromalia

Pardon my french
Joined
Dec 24, 2009
Messages
8,557
Reaction score
2,872
Location
Le Mans, France
Honestly, I would love a transcale or heck, any sort of real Steinberger with a graphite or composite neck.
To be fair, a lot of what made graphite/composite interesting in the 80es has gone away with the evolution of the manufacturing processes. Even my cheapest guitars are stable and pose no real issue. Recent evolutions of the floating trem are pretty decent even at entry level. Sure, a transtrem alows you to use it on chords but that's a pretty narrow use case.
I wouldn't mind a Parker but it's more for the aesthetics than the then-exotic materials.
 

bostjan

MicroMetal
Contributor
Joined
Dec 7, 2005
Messages
21,080
Reaction score
12,875
Location
St. Johnsbury, VT USA
To be fair, a lot of what made graphite/composite interesting in the 80es has gone away with the evolution of the manufacturing processes. Even my cheapest guitars are stable and pose no real issue. Recent evolutions of the floating trem are pretty decent even at entry level. Sure, a transtrem alows you to use it on chords but that's a pretty narrow use case.
I wouldn't mind a Parker but it's more for the aesthetics than the then-exotic materials.
:shrug: maybe it's the climate in the US vs France, but hard disagree on that first statement.
 

Wiltonauer

SS.org Regular
Joined
Aug 6, 2022
Messages
380
Reaction score
315
My friend’s boat-paddle original Transtrem Steinberger is one of the best guitars I’ve ever played. How I wish that were not true. They are ugly as shit and like $5k+ now.
 

Randy

✝✝✝
Super Moderator
Joined
Apr 23, 2006
Messages
24,444
Reaction score
14,297
Location
The Electric City, NY
Tuning stability definitely still a significant concern. I do think a solid graphite neck is no longer necessary, although I think you still need to go beyond just graphite/titanium under fretboard stabilizers.

The two schools of thought I think are either an endo skeleton (like the ZT3, with a graphite u-channel or Vigier with a carbon fiber laminate between wood splices) or an exoskeleton (like the Parker, with a carbon fiber skin on the back and fretboard on the top encasing a wood form). The solid graphite neck is nice but a level of rigidity beyond what's necessary.
 

MaxOfMetal

Likes trem wankery.
Super Moderator
Joined
Aug 7, 2008
Messages
41,795
Reaction score
40,877
Location
Racine, WI
I think Vigier is the perfect example of how much composite to use. They're so stable you don't need a truss rod. Just a thin, full thickness strip.
 

cardinal

F# Dive Bomber
Joined
Mar 6, 2007
Messages
7,261
Reaction score
5,927
Location
Northern Virginia
I could never buy a Vigier. The thought of being unable to adjust the truss rod would be a complete no go for me unless the neck was made of something entirely immune to temperature and humidity changes and somehow were molded to account for string tension.
 

MaxOfMetal

Likes trem wankery.
Super Moderator
Joined
Aug 7, 2008
Messages
41,795
Reaction score
40,877
Location
Racine, WI
I could never buy a Vigier. The thought of being unable to adjust the truss rod would be a complete no go for me unless the neck was made of something entirely immune to temperature and humidity changes and somehow were molded to account for string tension.

That's the point, the composite makes the neck immune to changes in temperature and humidity and is engineered to bend just enough to get great relief for 99% of setups.
 

cardinal

F# Dive Bomber
Joined
Mar 6, 2007
Messages
7,261
Reaction score
5,927
Location
Northern Virginia
That's the point, the composite makes the neck immune to changes in temperature and humidity and is engineered to bend just enough to get great relief for 99% of setups.
I dunno man. Unless they take months to carve the neck to release all the stresses as they shape it down, seems like it would still be too variable. And just moving from 9s to 10s needs a truss rod adjustment IME. Are these necks so stiff they are unaffected by that change in tension?

But I easily could be wrong. I've never seen/played one of these.
 

HeHasTheJazzHands

SS.org Regular
Joined
Jun 18, 2011
Messages
33,639
Reaction score
23,360
Location
Louisiana
I could never buy a Vigier. The thought of being unable to adjust the truss rod would be a complete no go for me unless the neck was made of something entirely immune to temperature and humidity changes and somehow were molded to account for string tension.
I'm like 99% sure that's the pitch for Vigier's neck.

The 90/10™ System​

Contrary to popular belief, the neck is truly where the tone of your instrument comes from. The 90/10™ system, exclusive to Vigier, consists of a wood neck reinforced with a carbon slab – the ratio between the two is 90% maple and 10% carbon fiber. A normal wood neck is too flexible, resulting in the strings losing energy when played, reducing both the sustain and impact of the note. The 90/10™ system alleviates this problem. Additionally, the carbon prevents the neck from deforming due to climate or a change in string gauge or tuning. Normally, this is why a truss rod is used, but with the 90/10™, there is no need for one.

I dunno man. Unless they take months to carve the neck to release all the stresses as they shape it down, seems like it would still be too variable. But I easily could be wrong. I've never seen/played one of these.
I mean Vigier is still around, and never switched back to using truss rods. So uh, I think he's doing something right. :lol:
 

MaxOfMetal

Likes trem wankery.
Super Moderator
Joined
Aug 7, 2008
Messages
41,795
Reaction score
40,877
Location
Racine, WI
I dunno man. Unless they take months to carve the neck to release all the stresses as they shape it down, seems like it would still be too variable. And just moving from 9s to 10s needs a truss rod adjustment IME. Are these necks so stiff they are unaffected by that change in tension?

But I easily could be wrong. I've never seen/played one of these.

It's really an amazing system. I'm cynical as fuck and I can't get over it.

Definitely try it if you can.
 

MaxOfMetal

Likes trem wankery.
Super Moderator
Joined
Aug 7, 2008
Messages
41,795
Reaction score
40,877
Location
Racine, WI
Wait… I thought Patrice retired and they closed up shop?

They are still operating through to the end of 2023, for now at least. They're closed to custom orders, but are fulfilling all dealer orders made prior to closing.

I believe the cut-off date was March of this year, but they seem flexible if there's a particular stock model you're looking for.

Obviously this has more to do with Patrice wanting to enjoy retirement than the construction of their necks. :lol:

Patrice has been at this for almost 50 years, some rest is well deserved. Perhaps in the next year an arrangement will be made to continue the brand. We'll see.
 

Kyle Jordan

Ace of Knaves
Joined
May 25, 2008
Messages
1,441
Reaction score
1,771
Location
Karakura Town
^Would be great if they can work out a way to stay in operation and keep Patrice in relaxation.

Reminds me somewhat of when Tom Anderson announced he was scaling back many years ago.
 

MaxOfMetal

Likes trem wankery.
Super Moderator
Joined
Aug 7, 2008
Messages
41,795
Reaction score
40,877
Location
Racine, WI
^Would be great if they can work out a way to stay in operation and keep Patrice in relaxation.

Reminds me somewhat of when Tom Anderson announced he was scaling back many years ago.

It's sort of a meme within the boutique world. A longstanding builder getting up there in age threatens to call it quits and when the orders pour in they start getting cold feet.
 


Top