F*ck Edge III-8

Discussion in 'Extended Range Guitars' started by Crescendo, Feb 23, 2016.

  1. Crescendo

    Crescendo Surgical

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    I've owned an Ibanez M80M for a year and I absolutely hate its bridge. Tone wise it is reliable, but other than that, no. Two saddle units which are expensive as ...., broke down the last time I changed strings, and I'm having a really hard time trying to put a screw back in a third unit, somehow it doesn't f*cking go in no matter what angle I try. I shouldn't have unscrewed it.

    I don't care for the fine tuning system in the bridge I just want a simple bridge for an 8 string that doesn't break down (this easily). Any recommendations? :mad:
     
  2. Michael_Ten

    Michael_Ten blergh yas

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    Basic rule of mechanics: the fewer moving parts, the less likely it is to break on you.

    Get a really basic bridge for the most stability. Hipshot tray bridges are great for their high precision machinery and ergonomic design, it's what I use on my 8. I also hear good things about the Schaller-Hannes, though I have no personal experience with one.

    But the Edge III-8 puts a pretty significant route in the body of your guitar, not sure if you can replace it without filling the cavity, first.
     
  3. Crescendo

    Crescendo Surgical

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    Think I changed my mind, I don't want to go through the hassle and install a new bridge, and I know where I can buy those saddle units it's just that I'd need four of them, which amounts to like $100 + shipping.
     
  4. yellowshiva

    yellowshiva Active Member

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    I recommend you change your guitar. To replace the bridge u need to make some pretty heavy modifications on it. If you ever want to sell it will be a huge problem.
     
  5. Michael_Ten

    Michael_Ten blergh yas

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  6. neurosis

    neurosis SS.org Regular

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    I have had this happen before man, mind you I just ruined one of the saddle screws. Sucks terribly bad.

    I suspect you are having this problem with the lower string saddles. I looked at what I did and realized this happens with large string diameters. The little peg in the saddle pushes against the string somewhat at an angle and the string does´t really give in (get smashed flat) like thinner wound string ends get. I have realized that when i screw the pot to tighten the saddle there is no need to over tighten. The strings are fat enough that they sit in the saddle with no need to push.

    Try to go slow with the allen key and stop as soon as you feel you are gripping the string. That should work.

    Sorry you had this happen. I also think it is a design flaw. If the screws were made of a stronger material to compensate for the length they´d break with more difficulty.

    Good luck!:hbang:
     
  7. jephjacques

    jephjacques BUTTS LOL

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    Yeah the screws are delicate, you have to be really careful not to overtighten them. Double-locking fixed bridges aren't really necessary but I guess the Meshuggah guys like them for whatever reason. The simpler fixed bridges they're putting on the other RG 8-strings are quite nice, from what I've heard.
     
  8. noob_pwn

    noob_pwn SS.org Regular

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    There's not a whole lot you can do about it on this guitar aside replacing the saddles that won't require some major surgery.
     
  9. Randy

    Randy The Pusterience™ Super Moderator

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    I don't think it'd be impractical to replace :2c:

    You could pull the anchors for the bridge, have a fill plate made (something not entirely conspicuous... maybe a piece of black anodized aluminum) with two mounting holes to screw it down and then mount regular flatmount bridge ontop of that (have it made with [or on your own, drill] the necessary screw holes to line up with your bridge of choice and just use screws long enough to make it down into the body).

    I bet somebody like fretsonthenet could make you one. It'd also be mostly reversible.
     
  10. neurosis

    neurosis SS.org Regular

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    That is actually a great idea. If you decide to mod the guitar I would give this a shot. The plate would be easily screwed into the guitar and would already include mounting holes for whatever bridge you decide to fit on it.

    I wonder if it would make a difference in the sound though since the bridges are steel mounting them on aluminum could alter the tone somewhat? Just asking. I am purely speculating here... :wavey:
     
  11. Michael_Ten

    Michael_Ten blergh yas

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    I would be cautious about doing this. You really want to avoid leaving empty space under the bridge, and mounting it on only the two stud locations could put too much torque on that spot; even the Edge III-8 is mounted on three points instead of two. If it's mounted poorly, you could rip the plate out of the body as soon as you string it up, tearing wood along with it. That would ruin your day pretty damn quick.

    Filling with wood is WAY safer (but more time consuming), but it's better to do something right than quick, especially in the world of guitar building/modifying. But who knows, you may be able to get a metal plate big enough to adequately fill the space and support a hard-tail bridge, it really depends on how deep the route is for the Edge III-8. I would talk to a luthier, personally.
     
  12. bzhan1

    bzhan1 Banned

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    Never had a problem with mine. Fine tuning and the best tuning stability known to an 8 string comes at a price. It's still less complicated and less prone to breaking down than a typical floyd.
     
  13. TTWC Ben

    TTWC Ben SS.org Regular

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    I had many issues with snapping the clamping screws off it saddle. I remedied this by buying some short M4 caphead bolts (which are hardened) to replace them and they work a treat.Having said this though, the main problem is overtightening. The block does not need to be clamped very tightly to reliably hold the string, the hard thing is trusting that it is tight enough! Another issue with over tightening the clamping bolt is 'squashing' the block which then becomes stuck in the saddle making string changes very difficult.So, do not over tighten! Screw it until you feel the block bite the string, then no more that an 45 to 60 degrees turn to clamp. This is more than adequate!
     
  14. Randy

    Randy The Pusterience™ Super Moderator

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    1.) I forgot the Fixed Edge has the lockdown screw in the back. Okay, so just add a third anchoring point in the back.

    2.) In my suggestion, I mentioned that the screws for the new bridge would simply pass-through the filler plate and be screwed directly into the body. So you've got three anchoring points for the the filler plate (you know, like the original bridge did) and the new bridge will be held into the body with just as many screws as it would if it were surface mounted directly onto the guitar like normal.

    If you disagree with the design that's fine but worrying that the whole thing is going to pull off the guitar the first time you tune it up is an overstatement.

    3.) He's made it clear that permanently modifying the guitar is something that's more work than he wants to get into right now. It can also be a very expensive rabbit hole (I'd know... I'm a luthier), and permanently modifying a reasonably pricey guitar will kill any resale value.

    I wanted to offer the guy at least a comparable option (price, difficultly and reverse-ability). You can .... all over that idea if you want but saying "go to a luthier and get it done right", in the context of the rest of this thread, is an absolute non-starter of a suggestion.
     
  15. Michael_Ten

    Michael_Ten blergh yas

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    ^
    Holy sh*t, sorry you got so offended by my comment. I definitely wasn't trying to sh*t all over your idea. I'm not intimately familiar with the design as you seem to be and I may not be as experience a luthier as you, but I know from Floyd Rose operations I've done (as a guitar tech, myself) that simply putting in a plate that way leaves too much empty space under the bridge and there would be no wood for the replacement bridge screws to even grab on to under the plate. And if there is wood under the plate, you still have to drill pilot holes in the wood for the bridge screws to mount on, and even more pilot holes if the bridge strings through the body, and drilling those holes does permanently alter the guitar in a way that would affect resale, no doubt.

    In general, when I talk to my clients, I feel it's significantly better to be safe than sorry, especially when dealing with a guitar they spend $1000+ on. My caution against your suggestion wasn't to necessarily say the suggestion, itself, was bad, but more to say "if you f*ck it up, you're f*cked beyond return, so probably don't try it OR get a pro to do it." Just my :2c:
     
  16. Randy

    Randy The Pusterience™ Super Moderator

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    The Fixed Edge route is only about a quarter inch deep and its perfectly flat. I'll post pics from an RGA8 I stripped this past summer.
     
  17. Randy

    Randy The Pusterience™ Super Moderator

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  18. Given To Fly

    Given To Fly SS.org Regular

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    I think this is the wisest course of action. The saddles you replace will probably never be a problem again and the guitar will maintain its resale value. Also, judging by the title you gave the thread, selling the guitar might not be a bad idea because the Fixed Edge III-8 is still going to be there.
     
  19. OmegaSlayer

    OmegaSlayer SS.org Regular

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    I had a saddle break on it too, but I wouldn't change the Fixed Edge for anything else in the world.
     
  20. Michael_Ten

    Michael_Ten blergh yas

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    Well, what we have here is an excellent case of foot-in-mouth syndrome.

    I recant my statement, by all means, plate away!
     

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