Does it bug you when songs are at the same tempo?

Discussion in 'General Music Discussion' started by UnattendedGolfcart, Aug 19, 2015.

  1. AdamMaz

    AdamMaz SS.org Regular

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    I like an album to feel like a larger-whole with dynamics, so yes.

    The moment I notice the trend, it bothers me greatly.
     
  2. CrushingAnvil

    CrushingAnvil Ironically enough, now in Jesus Land

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    It's not always appropriate, but when it is, it is :yesway:
     
  3. asetic

    asetic Shuffle Groove Lover

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    I don't know man, 20 bpm is quite a jump. Its literally like andante to allegro if not more. I think even a 10 bpm difference would be a noticeable difference in pace between your songs.
     
  4. hk_golgatha

    hk_golgatha has two first names

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    It doesn't necessarily bother me, but it does bore me to an extent. My band's last EP was written largely between 130 and 150 and it feels like it's lacking in dynamics.

    With what we've been writing lately we've encouraged ourselves to write anywhere we feel, and have mapped out each song's tempo for reference. Not to say "hey, we can't write anything else at 145," but to say, "you know, we don't have any slower songs, let's try writing at around 90-95." I'm much more satisfied with how the music has come out with songs ranging anywhere from 75 to 215 bpm.

    It's also important to me to use slight tempo changes mid song to accentuate parts and add small dynamic differences. A few bpm can make a bigger difference than you realize.
     
  5. DarkWolfXV

    DarkWolfXV Excised n anatomised

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    All of risecore, most of metalcore and djent is in 135/136 bpm or anything inbetween 135-145. I guess it works because it gets the mosh going and the best breakdowns are in 135. I wouldn't worry about it. Though, personally, I like a lot of tempo changes per song. Playing riff A once at 162 then again at 160 later in the song can make things more lively and dynamic. For my stuff, I'm talking 9, 11 tempo changes per song, since what I'm doing right now is really heavy and violent. Seamless tempo changes can be difficult to master, but once you grasp it, it becomes a really fun and interesting tool in your composition.
     
  6. Duosphere

    Duosphere (oYo) Lover

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    Nope.
    What bugs me is when songs sound the same with nothing exciting or creative, they sound generic.
    To me songs should feel(sound) like a roller coaster, playing all instruments during the entire song is boring, you need stops, different time signatures and even different guitar tones like clean and distorted you know, all compositional tools to make a song sounding exciting.Of course if you know how to use all other tools(good composer), you can have pretty exciting songs with only one tempo.
    Come'n probably 90% of pop music and rock bands songs have only one tempo.
     
  7. The Reverend

    The Reverend GHETTO KING OF SWAG

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    You know, things like tempo and key seem to me to be like metadata; things that are important, yes, but not necessarily the defining factor in a song. Tons of compelling pop music has been made at pretty much the same tempo, same for a lot of genres.
     
  8. Rev2010

    Rev2010 Contributor

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    Another thing people don't realize is if you play/record to a live drummer not using a click track it's human nature to slightly vary tempo to different parts in songs than if you record to a click track. It's natural human rhythmic dynamics. Thing is, many of us don't have that luxury and use softwares like Superior Drummer cause that's all we have and unless a tempo change or variation is programmed in we stick to the tempo assigned for the song. I don't mind it really. I still love my recordings and the recordings of others on here regardless.


    Rev.
     
  9. avinu

    avinu SS.org Regular

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    At least the responses are relatively neutral. The album thing i'm working on has ten songs written. Out of those ten I have five that are between 100 and 112 bpm. I feel terrible now.

    Thanks OP, giving me yet another aspect of writing for me to have an anxiety attack over. :lol:
     
  10. Sofos

    Sofos СофоƆ

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    I have 16 songs written for my band and half of them fall between 110 and 130 bpm, but i generally don't notice when playing them. It just seems like whenever I write riffs, my mental default tempo is 120, so I tend to write for that tempo
     
  11. The Hiryuu

    The Hiryuu Dot dot dot.

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    Youthanasia was the one that happened with, and why he stopped working with Max Norman.
     
  12. djyngwie

    djyngwie SS.org Regular

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    I feel quite the opposite. Once I've picked a tempo for a song I tend to stay there. Tempo changes can work, of course, but hearing stuff that jumps all over the map tends to be a sign of bad writing, imho. I've been in bands with people that did this, and most of the time it meant "I'm just pasting these parts together". It didn't really feel much like songs.
     

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