Does anyone bother about new artists?

Discussion in 'General Music Discussion' started by HANIAK, Mar 23, 2021.

  1. Mathemagician

    Mathemagician SS.org Regular

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    I’m an ancient man, my knee pops for no reason. MySpace was a fantastic thing for a few years at that point in time both for introducing people to social media/mass adoption of personal pages and for music and art discovery.

    I vaguely remember hearing about this band that was just one dude making music on there. “Periphery” or something I think it was. Neat stuff.
     
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  2. rokket2005

    rokket2005 SS.org Regular

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    I'm always looking for new music too, but lately I've been doing more digging in the archives than looking for brand new stuff. I picked up Gentle Giants first 6 albums last night and listened to them this morning at work. For someone who's been a big proghead for a long time and has known about them, it's interesting to hear them and kind of put these qualifiers on the music, like this particular album is kind of Zappa-ish but with both the pomp of early Genesis and the recklessness of Poseidon era King Crimson.
     
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  3. mongey

    mongey SS.org Regular

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    its a hard spot we are in

    For years the record companies had a strangle hold on who got to record music . and no doubt in this period the world never heard many amazing artists cause they were never in the right place at the right time . but many who were made a living out of it

    fast forward to now and everyone has the ability to record their music and get it out to the world, but there's so much of it and most of it is so mediocre no one cares.

    what's better ? I have no idea
     
  4. GunpointMetal

    GunpointMetal SS.org Regular

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    If you wanna do anything that falls into a niche (or a niche of a niche of a niche, like prog metal/death metal/djent/deathcore/etc) the only one responsible for the public reaction is the creator. I feel like I have a new favorite band every other week thanks to Apple Music and handful of FB groups.
     
  5. Spaced Out Ace

    Spaced Out Ace 0 0 1 0 0 6 5 0 3\

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    Not exactly to your point, but an issue I see a lot: Diversify your fucking music. I'm sorry to be so blunt, and I mean your in a plural sense (English doesn't have a plural form of 'you' like, for instance, French does), but bands with all of 1.5 influences are a scourge. They need to be bulldozed, ridiculed, mocked, demeaned, and run out. Bands who sound like they are giving said 1.5 influence a blowjob complete with prostate massage in every song are just plain awful. I get if you want to have an "AC/DC" type song, and a "Zeppelin" type song, and a "Priest" type song on your album. Plenty of bands have done it, and are quite original. However, when you do it so rigidly, retro fetishism fully on display, it makes the music completely pointless. Sure, glorify that AC/DC style in your song, but break their rules, do stuff they wouldn't do. If you're going to do it, don't do it as some paint by numbers song pastiche.

    Bands like Greta Van Susteren (they are just as boring as she is) and Airborne annoy me to no end, but what compounds that annoyance is this notion that "rock isn't dead." If rock "wasn't dead," then guess what? These clowns wouldn't get much attention. Just look at how quickly Kingdom Come bit the shitter after they got labelled "Zeppelin clones." But now, it is all fine and dandy because, "hey, at least it isn't RAP!" Which frankly, modern rap is mostly dreadful (my friend pointed out to me there are two types of rap, in general, and I prefer the type where they spit bars, as opposed to just some bullshit over a beat), but I digress. Unlike Gene, I don't think it died because of illegal downloading, but rather greedy, expired assholes who didn't know when to quit, and turned rock concerts into a luxury their old, out of shape fans, rather than the youth (I mean, rock IS about youth rebellion, after all). No kid can spend 150-200 bucks for a shitty spot in a venue, and they sure as hell aren't going to spend that on aging rock stars who should've called it quits years ago. More than that, the lack of "fun" in rock and metal has also been a major issue, and why rap / dubstep / pop all took over (disco, in other words).

    That said, the points made about too many bands are valid. We, the consumers, are now the A&R guys, with places like Soundcloud and Bandcamp as our inbox. God, what a dreadful endeavor. Most of them suck, quite a few are aimless, the songs just aren't there, the style of the songs (whether it is going for hard rock, heavy metal, etc) is just "heard it, and better to boot", etc. Hell, Razorfist blocked me because I summarized a video of his and the response, ending it by saying he "REEEEEE'd" when he didn't get the response he wanted. The video in question was one where he talked about "new wave of traditional heavy metal" proving that metal wasn't dead. The video was met with "meh" responses, which he should've seen, as even he was pretty underwhelmed when trying to blow smoke up his viewer's asses. For each one, he's like, "Well they are basically just this band plus this band, and those bands are sorta better, but... METAL ISNT DEAD!" Lmao. It was funny watching him struggle through that, and even funnier that he is such a bitch he'd block me pointing out how he reacted.
     
  6. Spaced Out Ace

    Spaced Out Ace 0 0 1 0 0 6 5 0 3\

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    Probably the one where people were actually making money, the scenes were actually alive, and the youth actually gave a fuck. The record companies (tata, record companies -- so sad you assholes won't be able to fund your defense companies means of bombing other countries with anti-war songs like you did in the past) were pretty daft. They thought that if having 1 x, y, or z meant $, then having 100 meant $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$. However, this is a dumb investment, as you flood the market with inferior products (some of them forced into being something they aren't), and meanwhile, watering down your golden goose.
     
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  7. Strobe

    Strobe SS.org Regular

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    At this point, I am in my 30's, and I never really had a dream of going big. I mean, if I had a chance to take a year off and tour I would have done it (and I might still consider it) - but given that I prefer to play metal - I am really not going for maximum commercial appeal here. That said, you can still have a very satisfying musical experience.

    I work a day job, and it pays the bills and even allows me to buy pretty much any gear I want (within reason). Pandemic notwithstanding, I played a lot of shows locally (and some in neighboring states). I make essentially no money from music, but I'll be damned if I am not having fun doing it. I get to meet other metal heads in the area. We have local fans and regulars who show up to many of our shows. People half my age still mosh to this stuff. After making a lot of connections and mostly not sucking, we occasionally get festival gigs - after rock fest this summer I will be able to say I opened for Snoop Dogg (granted, like a dozen bands before, but still :)). When the summer slaughter tour came through Minneapolis, we got to play real early in the day and walk around with artist armbands like we were important or something. I have had a lot of free beers thrown my way. The music biz sucks if you are trying to feed yourself off it, but it can still be a hell of a lot of fun if you stick to it.
     
  8. Demiurge

    Demiurge Intrepid Jackass

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    The record labels' hegemony could have overlooked or stifled amazing artists. Now, artists of similar caliber may have no less of a struggle to reach a large audience for pretty much the opposite reason. But I think that at least leaving the ability to publish music to the artists and the ability to develop tastes to the listener is better. Relying on big corporations to tell us who is famous & important- especially for something as deeply personal as music- just feels almost dystopian now.

    If it were important to me to get famous making music, perhaps I would feel differently, but it doesn't feel right complaining about there being too much music. It's like going to a party or a bar that's packed with people and hearing people grouse about the size of the crowd. OK, how many is too many? Who is the excess? What places you among those that deserve to be here and others not? It might be harder to find something you'll like but that is a first-world problem if there ever was one.
     
  9. mongey

    mongey SS.org Regular

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    allot of this also comes down to our subscription based lifestyle. we have generally removed the 1 outlet that underground artists had. album sales.

    now a band gets a fraction of a cent for each play. and there is so much content most listeners will check it out then move on. at least with albums the listener is already invested, its in their interest to give the music a chance if it doesn't instantly grab them . now why even bother when you just moved to the next thing
     
  10. budda

    budda Do not criticize as this Contributor

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    Fwiw, i havent heard the new songs from one of my favourite bands. So there's that.
     
  11. nightlight

    nightlight SS.org Regular

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    It might also be just metal losing its relevance. I think it's been a slow process, starting with all the glam bands playing neoclassical shred after aping Yngwie. It stopped being about the music and more about the technicality, at least that's what I see nowadays.

    I mean, modern metal: I listen to some dude making guttural sounds I don't understand to music being played in 13/8 and I don't know what to think. I'm not sure it's age-related either.

    It seems to play out in audience numbers too. There's definitely a reason why bands like Metallica and Iron Maiden and Judas Priest are still the biggest bands around.

    But compare them to the social media wizards of our time, and I suspect it would be like cognitive dissonance.

    I've always wondered how a gear demo could get more hits than a song from a new album on Youtube.

    But who's to blame? The record labels? Or the metal musicians themselves?

    Always was a small pond. Most folk don't stand a chance.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2021
  12. Spaced Out Ace

    Spaced Out Ace 0 0 1 0 0 6 5 0 3\

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    Speaking of social media wizards, a lot of whom seem to be rappers, if you gave me these two, and asked me to pick one to listen to, I'd choose the instrumental beat over mush mouth Shmurda's bullshit.





    The beat is dope. Shmurda's dumb shit might be true, but it is pretty boring.
     
  13. nightlight

    nightlight SS.org Regular

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    I wouldn't listen to either. I mean, compare it to this classic rap tune and it just falls to pieces.

     
  14. Merrekof

    Merrekof SS.org Regular

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    Born in '88 so when I started listening to heavier music and local bands, it was after 2000. Metal magazines and friends were the way find new music for me. These bands back then were already established bands. Around my 16th, I had acces to internet an went to venues almost on a weekly base. I got to know a lot of crap, but also some gems as well.
    20 years ago, an artist that recorded an album or EP was good. That artist had probably done a tone of gigs and sold merch to be able to afford a studio session. Nowadays, every kid with a guitar starts recording in their bedroom. It is a great era for beginning artists though, gear was never more affordable and available but that also means anyone can throw more shit on the pile.
    I must add that Spotify's algorythm works great, I got to know a bunch of great new bands, based on my previous listening sessions.
     
  15. coastalwaste

    coastalwaste SS.org Regular

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    It's just about chances, and there are tons of places (online) now offering them to release their music, everything is vague and just too much. I agree about having strong music producing skills and social media understanding because now it's about how you make it hits and known by people online. When you can influence more people, they will come for you, it's not just about music now, though I think the music matter more than popularity.
     
  16. Mprinsje

    Mprinsje st. anger ain't bad!

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    I really try to pay attention to new stuff but it's just so much I can't keep up.

    A lot of friends of mine do keep up and I get tons of good recommendations that I'll check out, but then I forget about them because of all the other stuff I've listened after that.
     
  17. VibTDog

    VibTDog who farted?

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    Times change. Believe it or not (I may just be being optimistic), but this honestly is the BEST time to release music. Youtube, Bandcamp, etc., are tools to exposing your music and are available FOR FREE, worldwide. Then for a small fee ($10 per song or $30 per album) you can hit all the streaming platforms through sites like Tunecore and CD Baby.

    Where I think everything goes wrong is that you have to be a salesperson of your product. Most of these bands/groups may lack the skills, knowhow, or even the realization that they have to take the extra step to push their music. Having it on these platforms alone will not get your numbers up. Dropping some coin on advertising ($2 a day on facebook ads gave me 20,000 more views over 5 days) will help. Business cards, posters, t-shirts, professional artwork, youtube testimonials/ads/music playthroughs/videos, hitting up facebook groups, Instagram; all will help. Obviously the most important thing is playing live, but who knows when that will happen again.

    Musical maturation and building an audience over time is key, and many people in bands don't have the patience for this. This stuff doesn't happen overnight. Believing in what you do and having the business sense to get it out properly is invaluable. The market is flooded and bands need to figure out how to stand out. I personally cannot wait to release more music.
     
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  18. Sermo Lupi

    Sermo Lupi SS.org Regular

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    Labels truly were key. I discovered a lot of prog bands through the inserts they used to put in the CDs of Inside Out Music artists. Lion Music was pretty much the de facto shred virtuoso label. And I remember when Roadrunner was not the juggernaut it later became, back when it was a big deal Slipknot was their first platinum selling artist. As much as we talk about the horrors of Sony, Warner or EMI, a lot of the comparatively niche metal labels were the rising tide that lifts all boats.

    I disagree somewhat about the early Internet age, though. Youtube was late, as was MySpace to some extent. 10+ years before they came around, discussion boards were a common source of music recommendations that replaced or supplemented word of mouth. Then, in the late 90s, Napster (and later KaZaa, Limewire, etc.) allowed you to sample music like never before. Among other things, this gave a better understanding of genre so that the recommendations you read online or in music magazines had relevance. MySpace and Youtube (and later streaming) mostly just consolidated and amplified these existing features. Now you could watch online instead of downloading, or you could comment on a video directly instead of going to a forum, etc.

    The history goes back further than that, but those were notable developments to music on the Internet that preceded the rise of social media.

    Friends were a big factor, as was your local music scene. Apropos of the question that was originally posed, I used to get excited to see bands touring my local area that would just be nobodies on Spotify today.

    You look at what happened with tech death in Quebec and you have to wonder whether scenes like that would flourish in the same way online. Music has so much cultural and artistic overlap (which to an extent is tied to the communities they come from) that decentralization via streaming can kill any buzz a band would otherwise have.
     
  19. VGK17

    VGK17 SS.org Regular

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    I would love to find some new artists to listen to. Unfortunately most of what I have seen are all copies of other better bands. Not just copying the style which is ok if they have their own sound or something unique about them, but copying the exact same sounds, the exact same song structure and even the exact same look. How many more bands to we need that start a song with the nasally downtuned faux-djent shit tone, female singer growling, then go into the super reverb clean "Hey look at me I learned different scales and arpeggios" part followed by the clean melodic singing then back again?
     
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  20. Dan_Vacant

    Dan_Vacant Hi I'm Dan.

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    I don't actively seek stuff out but I'll follow stuff like NPR, hat5six or what ever that hardcore channel is. And then just knowing hipsters. Is how I find new stuff.
     

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