Did Schecter invent the 26.5" scale?

Discussion in 'Sevenstring Guitars' started by Ziricote, Dec 16, 2019.

  1. Ziricote

    Ziricote SS.org Regular

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    I think most people gives the credit to Fender for introduce the 25.5" scale and 27"+ was always a thing in the baritone but is Schecter the creation of the 26.5" that we now see using by all the big companies such as the PRS, Ibanez, Mayones? Can anyone find who was using the 26.5" first or deserve the credit? I think it was Schecter!
     
  2. odibrom

    odibrom .

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    Scale lengths are not invented, since the formula for finding frets is the same on all scales. One uses this or that scale length but that doesn't mean it was "invented". By commercially using the 26.5", Schecter may have been the first (or not, why do you ask?), but I think there have been so many local luthiers doing that before and for a longer time..
     
  3. NeglectedField

    NeglectedField SS.org Regular

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    Kinda like asking who 'invented' fastening a string or strings at both ends and sounding notes from them to make music.
     
  4. jephjacques

    jephjacques BUTTS LOL

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    Maestro Alex Gregory invented it
     
  5. Promit

    Promit SS.org Regular

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    Yes. I spoke to a Schecter rep who explained that before they did it, guitar manufacturers believed it was not possible to build a guitar at 26.5" because it would be radioactively unstable. They were able to develop the necessary techniques for the 26.5" scale length to be manufactured and sold safely without undergoing gamma decay.
     
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  6. Ziricote

    Ziricote SS.org Regular

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    So did anyone do it before Schecter? I was have this conversation with random guy inside Guitar Center yesterday when I go looking for the 26.5" scale 7 string to buy and he use this term invented and he swear its best scale for the 7 string. Then the guys who work there saying its slowly becoming the standard scale for 7 strings and in 25 years it will be consider the standard for 7 string similar what Fender do with 25.5"
     
  7. spudmunkey

    spudmunkey SS.org Regular

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    Semantics/pedantics aside, what I'm sure he's really asking is, "Was Schecter the first to try to popularize the 26.5 inch scale in a production line?"

    Like...Ibanez didn't "invent" the 7 string, but they are credited for "bringing it to the masses".
     
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  8. Triple-J

    Triple-J the Experimetalist

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    I think it was Yamaha who came up with it as they developed a 26.5 scale 6 string sig for Ty Tabor of King's X (who was using drop A tuning) back in 2000 and then followed it up a year or so later with the Deep 6/D6 series which was a range of guitars with that scale.
    Schecter started making 7's around 96/97 and all those early models are actually 25.5 scale and they didn't make the switch to 26.5 until around 2001.
     
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  9. Promit

    Promit SS.org Regular

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    In all seriousness, I think 26.5" took off when the KM-7 sig took off. It seems like there were a handful before that, but that was a definite inflection point as far as I can tell.
     
  10. budda

    budda Do not criticize as this Contributor

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    Cant tell if sarcasm
     
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  11. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    Well, the long and the short of it is that Ralph Novak invented multiscale, so...

    Before guitars were mass produced, scale length could be anything. But as guitars began being made for everyone, each company had its own scale. Selmer, the favourite of Django Reinhardt in the 1930's used a 26 3/8" scale as standard, giving the guitar a snappy tone without sacrificing volume. That's darn close to 26.5, so let's say Selmer, for all intents and purposes, did it before Schecter.

    As for which scale length is "best," nothing could be more subjective. I prefer 28" for a 7 string, 27" for six, 30" for a low eight, 25" for a high eight, 37" for a five string bass, etc. Most guitarists think those lengths are insanely long. I think 25.5" is a bit short for a low B, but it certainly can be made to work. My BC Rich 7 string is 25.4" for some reason. It sounds very okay and plays great. But length is a continuous variable, so "inventing" a length is a rather preposterous concept to most people. Like, if I said that I invented a 13" long sandwich, people would just laugh at me and call me names, even if the "footlong" is the industry norm.
     
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  12. Grindspine

    Grindspine likes pointy things

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    The Ibanez RGD is 26.5" and has been in production since 2010. I do not know when Schecter first used that scale.
     
  13. HeHasTheJazzHands

    HeHasTheJazzHands SS.org Regular

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    At least 2000, with the Celloblaster A5X.

    So, once again, the ***GREAT*** Maestro Alex Gregory has another invention under his belt.

    :rofl:
     
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  14. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    2006 or earlier.

    But, like I said, Selmer was doing virtually the same scale length in the 1930's, so who cares?!
     
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  15. cardinal

    cardinal F# Dive Bomber

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    I don't really recall seeing 26.5 scale guitars before Schecter popularized it. 27" is essentially one fret longer than 25.5" scale. 26.5" is sorta kinda like one fret longer than 25" scale.
     
  16. StevenC

    StevenC Javier Strat 8 2022

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    For what it's worth I know the actual origin story of Schecter and 26.5" 7 strings.

    An unsatisfied Ibanez user brought his Universe into Schecter's shop in the early 90s and told them his issues with it and what he thought should be changed. After a couple of custom attempts 26.5 was settled on for his ideal 7 string scale. A few years later Schecter were planning the Diamond series and that original customer was now employed in some capacity at Schecter. When the decision to make 7s was made there was some serious persuading done, and eventually 26.5" was agreed upon. The guitars came out and the rest is history.
     
  17. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    Source?

    Seems dubious to me. Schecter was making 7s in the late 90's and early 00's with 25.5" scale lengths. (As an example: https://www.sevenstring.org/threads/1999-schecter-avenger-7-scale-length.324195/) By 2003, numetal was dead, and no one wanted to make sevens. I didn't hear anything about Schecter seven strings for a couple of years. In 2005, the C7 was introduced and it was, indeed 25.5" at that time. I hadn't heard about 26.5" until 2007, with the Loomis model.

    It doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me to decide on 26.5" "in the early 90's," then proceed to make their first model half a decade later with the same scale length they decided was the problem, discontinue their sevens a few years later, reintroduce them a few years after that with still the problem scale length, and then, finally, 15 years later, start building them with the previously decided spec.
     
  18. narad

    narad Progressive metal and politics

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    Everything Steven says sounds dubious but he basically spends all his time collecting Schecter and Strandberg trivia.
     
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  19. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    Ok. Not sure if that adds or subtracts credibility. :lol:

    I don't usually doubt what StevenC says, but this one is just too much a stretch for me, given the (easily verifiable) facts.
     
  20. StevenC

    StevenC Javier Strat 8 2022

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    The 26.5" wasn't immediate, but having heard from the horse's mouth and played the guitars involved, that is the truth.
     

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