Covid 19/Coronavirus

spudmunkey

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Yes, parallax second.

Joe Rogan has covid and is using Ivermectin.

And monoclonal antibody treatment, which only has "emergency use authorization". And Ivermectin isn't approved for treating COVID. So he's not actually hesitant of anything not officially approved, and willing to gobble down/take in anything because he's scared.
 

estabon37

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Again; sorry for the slow / late reply. Teaching, man...

Okay, first up: Jesus fucking Christ I didn't realise how much I missed detailed, nuanced interactions on the internet until I read this reply. I work with 11-15 year olds and reduced my internet interactions to just Reddit (basically the same as interacting with 11-15 year olds) just out of sheer lack of time. Thanks for taking the time to walk me through some stuff, Drew.

Next:

Remember that most healthcare is obtained through health insurance, most health insurance is obtained through an employer, and only part of the cost of coverage is borne by the insured. Further, while there are a large number of health insurers in the country, they are all organized at the state level and have limited-to-no ability to compete over state lines, so in any given state you might have two or three major health insurers working at scale, and there are pretty huge economies of scale when it comes to competing for the health insurance business of an entire company. In pratice, the health coverage market is often a duopoly or triopoly in America, with end cstomers rarely seeing options from more than one or two poviders, with a handful of total plans open to them.

Next, remember that most insurance companies operate within a preferred "network" where reimbursement rates go up pretty significantly if you go out of network. ...

The upshot of all of this is, from the sake of someone with insurance, they've chosen from one of a handful of available plans, made available to them through their work from one or two insurers. Those insurers will then tell them which hospitals they need to choose from. ...

In short, nothing at all about health care in America functions at all like a market. ...

But, in theory, an actual healthcare marketplace could probably work pretty well and would help control costs, if only we had one. :lol:

Everything you wrote is WHY I'm ignorant. I don't know of any other system on the planet that works the way health care in the US 'works'. Australia has a private system, but it works the way private schools work: you're automatically entitled to the free option and the free option is actually functional at worst at fantastic at best (again; I aim to set up a separate education thread/rant in a couple of weeks when I'm on school holidays), but if you want to purchase the rights to a private option it's going to come with a lot of great facilities and bells and whistles. It won't change the core service at all, but you'll be super comfortable while using the service, and you won't have to interact with poor people.

I follow the situation in the US partially out of it being all over international news, but largely because my partner was born over there and two of her brothers are currently living in NT state and Pennsylvania. I've been over there a couple of in the last five years and everyone I was lucky enough to meet and every community I briefly interacted with made me feel more invested in wanting them to do well. I got asked about healthcare a weird amount. It seems that through the internet / social media a growing number of Americans are seeing how convoluted their system is and how heavily it's designed to profit the owners of various companies. Personally, I think it would benefit everyone if it became a shared national system with more regulations, but if it can instead become a true marketplace then that would still be better than the current setup/.
 

estabon37

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The problem is we have seen that in the last few decades we have seen a huge decline in people's trust in authority figures. ... Just look at the numbers of Prime Ministers Australia has had since 2007 and how they were ousted.

I agree with your sentiment, but I think this bit needs clarity for people not familiar with the Australian system. Four Prime Ministers were ousted in eight years by their own parties. Where some countries directly vote for their leaders, we vote for a party, and whoever leads the party leads the country. What you wrote might ambiguously imply that the Australian people quickly come to distrust their leaders and use electoral / political processes to remove them from leadership. The reality is ... dumber. Just, so much dumber. I don't remember the last time I met someone that liked a Prime Minister unless they're talking about whoever was in charge 3-8 Prime Minsters ago. I'm not sure we ever had trust in authority figures in this country, and I used to think that was a good thing until the conspiracy theorists started getting in everyone's ears.

We had an overdose yesterday in Australia of someone buying Ivermectin illegally online and scoffing a lot of them.
Please, if you going to take prescription drugs, you gotta be careful.

Well, that sucks. Sounds like someone who had real potential as Prime Minister.
 

nightflameauto

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What sucks about American healthcare is you can't even really have a rational discussion with people about how to fix it. Trying to even casually mention that maybe we could reform it and make it a little less expensive instead of tagging words like "affordable" onto free tickets for the insurance companies will get at least half of the people around you to start throwing massive fits about how doctors need to eat too and we have to let people make money.

Maybe not every hospital needs to look like a fucking cathedral in the entrance? How about they spend the money they rape out of our pockets on functionality instead of sports arenas and such? Nope. GOTS TO MAKE MONEY!

Some of us are literally priced out of healthcare just to get by. If my wife or I were to actually have emergency care, we'd probably go bankrupt at this point. It's fucked, but we don't dare discuss fixing it. Lip service from the Democrats about doing something during election cycles, but their fixes thus far have only increased premiums and prices for service for those of us that tried to pay in until it became completely unaffordable. Apparently the fix is to fuck everybody that doesn't have millions. Those people (government officials and millionaires) get Cadillac plans from taxpayer money. Everybody else needs to pull themselves up by their bootstraps and work harder!

AMERICA! FUCK YEAH!
 

Drew

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Calculating parsecs as a measure of time will be dependent on the known difficulty of going through a specific route as the variable in the distance/time equation. ;)
I mean, I don't want to take anything for granted, but I assume weve all seen Solo here, no? :lol:

@estabon37 - god, no problem man, and like I said, your understanding was basically accurate. There's just some added nuance in there too.
 

Drew

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What sucks about American healthcare is you can't even really have a rational discussion with people about how to fix it. Trying to even casually mention that maybe we could reform it and make it a little less expensive instead of tagging words like "affordable" onto free tickets for the insurance companies will get at least half of the people around you to start throwing massive fits about how doctors need to eat too and we have to let people make money.
The tricky thing is, in some ways - they're not wrong. My dad was a primary care internist, and at 40 I'm reasonably sure I'm making more than he was at the end of his career - one of the side effects of, well, a LOT of health care reform laws in the last 20-40 years is that primary care medicine has become increasingly unprofitable to provide, thanks in large part to the way Medicare reimbursement rates are calculated, despite the fact that it's so critical to health outcomes.

Meanwhile, while I'm not even close to hurting, my fiancee makes a multiple of what I do, as a specialist.

There are a LOT of things that don't make sense about health care in America, but the upshot is we live in a world and a country where you can say some people are being priced out of health insurance, and you can say primary care doctors are struggling to get by, and BOTH statements can be true.
 

IwantTacos

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The tricky thing is, in some ways - they're not wrong. My dad was a primary care internist, and at 40 I'm reasonably sure I'm making more than he was at the end of his career - one of the side effects of, well, a LOT of health care reform laws in the last 20-40 years is that primary care medicine has become increasingly unprofitable to provide, thanks in large part to the way Medicare reimbursement rates are calculated, despite the fact that it's so critical to health outcomes.

Meanwhile, while I'm not even close to hurting, my fiancee makes a multiple of what I do, as a specialist.

There are a LOT of things that don't make sense about health care in America, but the upshot is we live in a world and a country where you can say some people are being priced out of health insurance, and you can say primary care doctors are struggling to get by, and BOTH statements can be true.

how is that an upside.
 


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