Can a non-recessed trem pull up even if just a bit?

Discussion in 'Beginners/FAQ' started by Rynphos, Feb 12, 2021.

  1. Rynphos

    Rynphos SS.org Regular

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    Sorry if this is a really obvious question, but I've been debating which guitar should I purchase to have a trem in my arsenal, as I've been gravitating towards those sounds a bit lately.
    I've found that my favourite guitars (eg: Schecter Nick Johnston signature and the likes) don't have a fully recessed bridge, which at first annoyed me quite a bit.
    Since I'm not into fully abusing my trem, but instead using it to add minor flavour and some fluttering here and there, I'm wondering if a non recessed bridge can still be used to pull up, even if by just half a tone, or even flutter in that way.

    Edit: I'm specifically referring to 2-point trems.
     
  2. CerealKiller

    CerealKiller SS.org Regular

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    Yep, just loosen the springs. I've set my Vigier with a non-recessed vibrato up to allow 1½ note pull-up.
     
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  3. mmr007

    mmr007 SS.org Regular

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    trem example.jpg
    Yes. As you can see on this strat, you can leave a small gap to allow very moderate pulling up of the tremolo, but the more lift you allow the more you might suffer high string action and tuning instability...or do what Vai did and get the guitar you want and a good wood chisel set
     
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  4. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    Yes it is possible, but you have to set the bridge up to be free floating, which a lot of vintage trems can do to very variable results.
     
  5. Choop

    Choop n______n

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    Jeff Beck uses the strat trem quite a bit here, even doing some flutter! Skip to 3:30

     
  6. USMarine75

    USMarine75 The man who is tired of the anus is tired of life Contributor

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    I could be wrong but I think he invented trem flutter. Hes been doing it I think since early 70s maybe late 60s. (I'd have to look up the release date to be sure)

    I had a Beck Strat and it came set up at a 30-45 degree angle. The 5/6 screw and 2 post Fender trems work incredibly well for glissando, note and chord vibrato, and flutter... just not mad dive bombing shenanigans.

    This playthrough by Michael shows how well it works (he played Beck as well as Beck IMO):

     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2021
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  7. eaeolian

    eaeolian Pictures of guitars I don't even own anymore! Super Moderator

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    He's damn close. That's an excellent performance.
     
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  8. cardinal

    cardinal F# Dive Bomber

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    If the guitar is a bolt on, you can shim the neck so that you can maintain low action and raise up the 2-point bridge to whatever height you want to give pull up range. I use to aim to get a full step up on the 3rd string when the bridge was all the way back.
     
  9. Abominorg the Grotesque

    Abominorg the Grotesque SS.org Regular

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    The standard strat bridge was actually designed with the intention that you would leave that 1/8 inch or so space and have a floating trem. If you set it flat against the body the string holes in the trem block don't quite line up properly with the holes on the back plate. If you set it floating they line up perfectly. A properly set up floating strat bridge also suffers from less tuning instability, as the tension of the strings and springs work against each other to balance out and hold it stable. It's not as stable as a floyd of course, but not anywhere near as prone to going wildly out of tune as when the bridge is set flush with the body.

    I often keep mine flush with the body as I think it yields better results with rhythm guitar and palm muting, and I don't often use the bar. But the floating option has always been pretty common with strat players.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2021
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