Best CD Duplication Options

Discussion in 'Recording Studio' started by Najka, Oct 27, 2019.

  1. Descent

    Descent SS.org Regular

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    CD is soo de rigueur, right? This screams high end meets old school, plus you can always delete and give one to grandma with family pics, then she can become a fan as well :)

    I am seriously looking into these for our band.
     
  2. Najka

    Najka SS.org Regular

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    I like the idea of bundling it with a poster.. still get to see the artwork and image.

    I was just thinking that the USB could be an opportunity to include additional files for media, like extra pictures, videos.. something more to reward someone for actually plugging it into their computer. I guess the booklet with lyrics could also be made into digital format and included.


    Something of note - 100 of the personalized USB drives tends to cost more than 100 jewel cases from the instant quotes on a couple sites..

    kind of nice to be able to stick it in your wallet at a show.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Nicki

    Nicki SS.org Regular

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    Cover art can be embedded in the metadata of the MP3 file so that when it plays in iTunes or WMP, it shows the cover art. It can also be included as a high quality JPEG on the USB drive.
     
  4. Descent

    Descent SS.org Regular

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    Where did you find these credit card sized? I might need a quote.
     
  5. fcv

    fcv SS.org Regular

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    I've ordered just blank white card shaped drives from these guys before to be able to carry some files around easily in my wallet, and they offer that type of printing service: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00OOD3TSY/

    I've used maybe about 30 of their drives with no issues/failures. I originally chose them since I read somewhere they were using toshiba memory chips in theirs, and these days theres a lot of piss poor flash memory floating around, however I'm unable to find any sort of source on that at the moment, and that was also quite a while ago, so who knows how they are now.
     
  6. Descent

    Descent SS.org Regular

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    I ordered a 20 tape-like USB drives run from Discmakers as we have a high profile gig this weekend and need merch. We'll see how it goes. I'll post once I get them in.
     
  7. fantom

    fantom Misses his 6 strings

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    I don't think I would ever put a USB drive from a band in any computer I care about. The number of attack vectors over USB has increased to the point it is not worth the risk.

    Find anything people will buy (shirts?) and give a "free" download code to anyone buying a shirt "tonight only"
     
  8. Nicki

    Nicki SS.org Regular

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    Most people are smart enough these days to run anti-virus software on their machines. Typically those AVs will scan devices as soon as they're plugged in.

    Additionally, I would less skeptical of a band selling me a USB drive with their music than I would of a random USB drive I find in the street (where those kinds of attacks are most common).
     
  9. Merrekof

    Merrekof SS.org Regular

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    My bandmates and I are going through the same thinking. Who buys cd's these days? The majority of my friends doesn't even own a cd player. One guy smiled when he saw my cd collection. "Yeah, my dad also has a lot of cd's".. -_-'
    To be fair, I only played cd's once in the last three years or so. (When said friend came to visit)
    I have Spotify on my phone, paired with bluetooth speakers so I ain't shitting with discs anymore.
    So now we are in between, go through the whole cd making process or just ditch it and find another way to release our music.
    That cassette tape usb thingy looks cool!
     
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  10. decoy205

    decoy205 SS.org Regular

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    If you’re trying to sell a physical product for music I wouldn’t recommend CDs. I agree with the others there’s just not enough people who can actually still use them. You’ll end up with 500-1000 cds sitting in your basement.

    The cassette drive idea is cool or the wallet drive. People will pay for something that is different and inventive. The shirt idea is also good cuz you can wear it. If you really want to sell something standing out helps. Good luck!
     
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  11. Descent

    Descent SS.org Regular

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    Well a CD can be priced at $10 and you'll make a profit from selling it at that price. With other mediums it's much more for physical profit. Plus people should have something to sign.

    I ended up getting USB cassette-like custom made as we were running out of CDs. On the first show we had it as merch, we sold out the remaining CDs and not a single USB so far :)

    https://scrollkeeper.bandcamp.com/merch/limited-edition-lady-death-path-to-glory-usb-drive
     
  12. fantom

    fantom Misses his 6 strings

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    You can buy 3 color silk screened shirts for less then 3 bucks at quantities around 100 (at least you used to). The quality was on par or better than most touring bands. And the print was usually straight and not borked. Arguing that buying 500 CDs to get a bulk deal and make profit seems pretty risky. I'd much rather buy 100 shirts and sell them for $7 profit than end up with 450 CDs in a garage. We started giving CDs away to people buying shirts to unload them.
     
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  13. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    Shout out to Atomic Disc. I was able to get cheaper prices AND better services from them than through Discmakers. I'd look into it at least.

    I still love physical media, BTW.
     
  14. Politics of Ecstasy

    Politics of Ecstasy OG Shredder

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    +1 for Discmakers

    They are very good.....and if your CD image layout isnt done properly, they will call to make sure to adjust and check before they print

    I gotta say, for the value of what you get, the awesome product and the assurance of quality, i wouldnt look elsewhere unlesss you know they are good and/or you have an amazing deal
     
  15. Blynd

    Blynd Custom Guitar Part Builder

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    If you want an interim incredibly cost effective solution, I suggest going with a usb duplicator. I actually have one I’m about to sell because I’m no longer in a band but that was a huge money saver if you are looking to give out CDs or sell EPs for a low cost.
     
  16. jack_cat

    jack_cat SS.org Regular

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    I am half of a regularly gigging duo act, and we sell CDs that we produce ourselves on a three-bank CD duplicator, which cost us around 800 USD, and has been a very good investment; it is the second duplicator that we have owned in 15 years. The drawback is that we use paper sticky labels instead of printing directly on the CD; the direct-print-label technology is not cost effective for very small runs. We have the artwork and sticky labels printed by a local printer. The sticky labels are starting to be a problem to obtain and we may have to abandon them; they also have occasionally come unglued inside somebody's car CD player on a hot day, so they are not the best technology anyway.

    For at least 10 years if not more I have been expecting the market for CDs to die. We know many people who say that they no longer own a CD player; yet we often sell a half-dozen CDs at a gig (we play in restaurants for tourists), although this number fluctuates seasonally. It appears that at least some people have some established routine for dumping CDs directly into their MP3 players.

    Attempting to anticipate this coming market change, a couple of years ago we tried offering a USB thumb drive with our entire disc collection on it in MP3, and it bombed. We didn't sell any. We only made about 5; there are still a couple of them around. Perhaps the
    problem is that we can't sell them cheaply enough. You can go to the flea market and buy a USB thumb drive full of hundreds of tunes for basically the price of the drive. It may be also that we didn't put any effort into making a fancy package with art-work. If some listener actually asks about a USB drive, it is such a rare occurrence that it is memorable. If some other musicians are successfully marketing these I would like to hear about it. It sounded like a good idea at the time. The guy who suggested this, earlier in this thread, might like to tell us how many he has sold.

    The somewhat bigger picture is that the current procedure for putting digital music files in front of audiences has devalued a "song" a great deal. I am appalled at the amount of effort some of my musical friends have put into creating and maintaining large musical projects which are then distributed through CDBaby and Spotify etc. and/or the whole array of digital ahem "services", in exchange for an occasional check for twenty five cents in "royalties" after investments of hundreds of dollars. Thus we, the creators of music become the paying clients of operations which see us, not the CD buying public, as the cash cows. Anything that removes the cost of intermediaries and promotes a direct sale to a listening audience member is far more cost effective.
     

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