Are Scallops Important For Malmsteen Fluidity?

Discussion in 'Standard Guitars' started by narad, Aug 10, 2019.

  1. Hollowway

    Hollowway Extended Ranger

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    I’m partial to the maple boards, myself. And I thought about just buying a cheap Strat, and scalloping the FB myself, but I know damn well I’ll never get around to it, lol.
     
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  2. The906

    The906 lifetime novice Contributor

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    I need to youtube it but what would one use? Various drill bits at a 90 degree angle?
     
  3. Hollowway

    Hollowway Extended Ranger

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    Looks like most people use cylindrical files. But I was thinking about using a Dremel and the little drum sanders that come with it. I don’t want to spend forever doing it. Although, slow and steady would be the correct way. I think the toughest thing is to keep the radius on the board.
     
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  4. KnightBrolaire

    KnightBrolaire chasing the tone dragon

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    :noway: dremel is a terrible idea unless you're very diligent. They can eat through wood pretty quickly. I just fucked up widening a pickup route last night with one.
     
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  5. Hollowway

    Hollowway Extended Ranger

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    Hey now, “terrible idea” is my go-to method for guitar work!
    :lol: I suppose slow and steady is the way. I WOULD like to use a drum sander hookup in some way, but I know where you’re coming from. Too bad there isn’t a Stew Mac for modern players. There might be a set of files for just such a thing.
     
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  6. Fred the Shred

    Fred the Shred Shrederick

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    In a nutshell, scallops are cool if you have a light touch when fretting (which you should anyway), as the lack of attrition obviously helps with string bending and vibrato. To be honest, while it does look cool as fuck (because let's face it: a guitar fingerboard like a lute's is pretty darn metal :lol: )m there's no real advantage over the likes of any extra jumbo fretwire, where it takes your intonation having gone to crap through sheer force for you to even experience any kind of contact with the wood anyway.

    It's one of those things where it's really a matter of liking that particular form for the function, which can be achieved anyway with a simple refret.
     
  7. thedonal

    thedonal SS.org Regular

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    Good man! Keep on keeping on!

    I used a Dremel to widen sockets for bigger pots (CTS) in my Epiphone. And to add a slight channel in my RG1527 so I could flip the bridge PUP round (DiMarzio Crunch Lab- wanted the bar away from the bridge and it wouldn't sit flat enough without).

    Just be bloody careful if you do!!
     
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  8. Edika

    Edika SS.org Regular

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    I think mussel memory also plays a big role aside from scallops.

    I know late to the party...
     
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  9. MetalHex

    MetalHex SS.org Regular

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    Scallops > mussels anyday! Especially fried scallops
     
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  10. Hollowway

    Hollowway Extended Ranger

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    We’re pretty much done with this discussion anyway. It’s time to make as many music related seafood puns as possible! Or at least until I can come up with 1600 clams for a YJM Strat.
     
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  11. Wolfhorsky

    Wolfhorsky Regular idiot

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    Dunno if it was mentioned before, but here goes.. Allegedly Yngwie said sth like that „I like scalloped fretboards, because i can hold the notes by their balls”. :lol:
    Maybe it is just an urban legend, but still funny enough.
     
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  12. Richter

    Richter SS.org Regular

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    You might want to check the various japanese versions, got my ST72 (scalloped but not an YJM model) used for €600 and it slays the american YJM I had.
     
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  13. sharedEQ

    sharedEQ SS.org Regular

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    I think if you scallop a rosewood, you don't have to spray a neck finish. Scalloping maple will require it be sprayed.

    I've had a maple neck resprayed and the new finish flaked.
     
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  14. sharedEQ

    sharedEQ SS.org Regular

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    Logic.

    Actually, I believe the best solution is med/jumbo frets with only the upper access scalloped. Then you get the intonation stability where you are chording and have easier bends where the strings have highest tension.

    Isn't one of the Vai guitars built that way? Or does he have jumbos with upper access scalloped?

    Also, the smaller frets are narrower so there will be less resistance med+scalloped than with jumbos. In highest frets fingers still rubbing fretwire.
     
  15. Fred the Shred

    Fred the Shred Shrederick

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    Personally, I find fretwire attrition quite negligible (small hands and all, but I can believe people with larger fingers finding it more noticeable and annoying), but I can't really say the same at all about wood, which does make the resistance far more noticeable, hence my undying hatred for the super small vintage frets on electric guitars in general.

    As for Vai's JEM's, they are only scalloped on the very last 4 frets, so 20 to 24. It's not really related to tension, as the force needed to bend a string there is negligible compared to the same travel near the nut due to the angle the string would have to be at to reach the desired pitch, comparatively. There's a lot of personal quirks to Steve's axes throughout the years, some of which for aesthestic or performance related flashiness, so I don't really know whether he ever truly placed a lot of functional emphasis on those scalloped frets - the Universes didn't have them and he didn't ever seem to be uncomfortable or struggling in the slightest (go figure :lol: ).
     
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  16. StevenC

    StevenC SS.org Regular

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    I think the reason given for the scallops on the JEM was something to do with adding sustain because on the square joint JEMs there was no neck wood under those frets. Which never made any sense to me, just I think I read it in an Ibanez book.
     
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  17. Fred the Shred

    Fred the Shred Shrederick

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    To be 100% honest, just like scalloping itself as opposed to larger fretwire with the crowning of your choice, I think the answer we are truly looking for is, aside from whatever pseudo-technical justification one can try to come up with, "it looks cool as fuck, I have it and you don't, nyar nyar!" :lol:
     
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  18. Hollowway

    Hollowway Extended Ranger

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    You should check out the Ritchie Blackmore scallop style. He has it super shallow on the 1st fret, and get gradually deeper toward the 21st. Plus, he has it only right near the fret itself on the lower frets, rather than in the middle (between the frets) like on a YJM. I’ve never played one, but I suspect that makes chording WAY easier to do without making the notes too sharp.
     
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  19. Ancestor

    Ancestor Contributor

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    I don't like playing without them.
     
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  20. robertkoa

    robertkoa SS.org Regular

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    The fluidity is not from the scalloped board....that aids in the Vibrato and possibly aids in a lighter touch with left hand but Yngwie is an amazing Guitarist- this from someone who plays nothing resembling metal or hard rock - but skill is skill .


    The fluidity comes in Malmsteen's case from being -still- one of the best alt pickers on the Planet , and he can also hammer entire passages .
    If he played a regular well adjusted Strat with Jumbo or true Medium Jumbo frets - we would not probably hear a difference, he might have to work a little harder -I doubt if we would notice.
    Yngwie also has very good 'time' and articulation and vibrato.
    People love to criticize him - but he is truly amazing at what he does.
    So IMO - scallops are not going to make that much difference.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2019

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