Advice on an out of tune G

Discussion in 'Pickups, Electronics & General Tech' started by Shakadula, Dec 21, 2019.

  1. Shakadula

    Shakadula New Member

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    Hi all, New to this site so I am hoping for some help on something I should know. Just bought a used Squier Strat (made in Indonesia in 2011) and the intonation is dead on but when I play an open A and open D, it sounds terrible. The G is off. So I get the G to where the open chords sound okay but I pay for it on other places on the fretboard.

    The neck seems fine and the strings a pretty new and as I said, the intonation is dead on. Is it the NUT?

    Thanks.
     
  2. MaxOfMetal

    MaxOfMetal Likes trem wankery. Super Moderator

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    Yeah, a "wild" 3rd string is something of a common problem.

    There are ways to fix it though, namely a compensated nut. Earvana makes a somewhat drop-in replacement for Strats.
     
  3. Science_Penguin

    Science_Penguin SS.org Regular

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    Why is it always the 3rd string anyway?
     
  4. Scordare

    Scordare SS.org Regular

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    How is the G off? ..sharp? If the slot in the nut is high, your fretted notes will be sharp. The G also has a tendency to go sharp quickly with excessive finger pressure. I like to tune the string slightly flat to compensate..
     
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  5. USMarine75

    USMarine75 The man who is tired of the anus is tired of life Contributor

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    Make sure the nut slot is lubed/greased (you can use a graphite pencil), so it isn't getting bound once you start playing.

    Also, try a wound G if all else fails. You can compensate with a smaller gauge so it is still comfortable to bend.
     
  6. rowsi

    rowsi SS.org Regular

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  7. c7spheres

    c7spheres GuitArtist

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    Same with me. I use a burnished nickel GHS bnr24 wound 3rd on mmy 7 strings. I can second that it doesn't act funny and it takes away that twang thin sound too, especially with the burnished nickel. It's smooth sounding. It is hard to do big bends on though, so dedending on what you want this may or may not work for you.
    - I've also tried stainless stell boomers wound 20 and they don't act funny either. Much easier to bend and brighter, but still no twang too. Most people I would assume would like this string more than the burnished one.
    - Making sure the nut is right like said above and properly stretching the string will have a huge impact on taming the erratic behavior for sure too.
     
  8. Shakadula

    Shakadula New Member

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    Thanks all. I think I will try a wound G to see if that helps. Wonder why I don’t have this issue on my 68 Tele.
     
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  9. Meeotch

    Meeotch SS.org Regular

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    Love the wound G! I use an 18w and I've never broken one. Though I wouldn't go any smaller.
     
  10. PRS_Baritone_Vito

    PRS_Baritone_Vito SS.org Regular

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    I vote for the wound G string as well. I always had problems with plain G strings and it drove me nuts. Switching to wounds really helps.
     
  11. Emperoff

    Emperoff Hasta la vista, Baby Contributor

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    I'd replace the nut. Pretty advisable upgrade anyways.

    I had a guitar that the G string sounded like it had a built in chorus. It always puzzled me, but it stayed in tune so...
     
  12. TheWarAgainstTime

    TheWarAgainstTime "TWAT" for short

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    Do your Tele and Strat have the same amount of string retainers? If the Strat only has one for the high E and B strings, then the G and D strings may be having tuning issues due to the break angle at the nut being too shallow. If it has two string retainers, then it's still possible the nut and/or the retainer itself is binding the string and causing the tuning problems.

    I'm also a fan of using a wound 3rd string, though I usually go a bit heavier than most people do for it so it will feel more like the D and A strings rather than trying to keep the slinky feeling of a plain string.
     
  13. Shakadula

    Shakadula New Member

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    Twat, good point. 1 tree (b and e) on the tele and 2 on the strat d and g and b and e). I have two roller trees on my amazon wish list so maybe its time to pull the trigger with new strings too.
     
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  14. ixlramp

    ixlramp SS.org Regular

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    If the intonation is 'dead on' as you claim, then the G string will be in tune open and on every fret, so it cannot be 'out of tune' =) What does your tuner say about its pitch open and on every fret?
    Maybe it is in tune everywhere but just 'sounds wrong'? This is expected because it is a thick plain steel string, so has high stiffness and high 'inharmonicity' (harmonics put of tune with fundamental). In which case a thinner gauge, or even better, a wound 3rd, will help reduce stiffness.

    This has become such an issue for me that often i partially or entirely decide the transposition of a tuning for a guitar by optimising the plain steel to wound transition: Minimising the gauge of the largest plain steel string, and using the thinnest practical wound next to that.
    I refuse to use a plain steel over .016, and even .016 is borderline tolerable.

    Unfortunately, for both guitar and bass guitar, standard scale, tension and tuning result in the worst possible plain to wound transitions:
    For guitar G, a .016p is stiff, but the equivalent tension .018 wound is fragile due to its thin core.
    For bass guitar F, a .018p is stiff, but the equivalent tension .020 wound is very fragile at that high tension due to its thin core.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2020
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  15. Spaced Out Ace

    Spaced Out Ace 0 0 1 0 0 6 5 0 3\

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    Because it's not meant to be plain.
     

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