Writing Video Game Music

Discussion in 'Computers, Electronics, IT & Gaming' started by Maybrick, Jul 28, 2016.

  1. Maybrick

    Maybrick SS.org Regular

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    Have any of you guys had a go at trying to write video game music? I'd like to give it a try in Cubase seeing as I already have it but wanted to know what VSTs/Plugins people use/know of to be a good starting point. Im not bothered if its a paid plugin or not.

    Any resources/materials that you used would be great. I've watched some videos on YouTube but it seems hard to get anything really useful in terms of specific software they use. Currently going through a basic course on Udemy for it.

    I'd love to learn to write some stuff similar to Jeremy Soule (Elder Scrolls games, Guild Wars 2, Icewind Dale etc) and also some of the earlier WoW stuff like vanilla, TBC, WOTLK).

    Any advice would be awesome.
     
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  2. Pav

    Pav ???

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    Software doesn't matter, you can use any DAW you want. Cubase would work just fine. The first step is really to find a game to score since scoring with no content behind it won't make any sense. But you could easily accomplish that by taking an existing game and creating your own original soundtrack for it. It's all about writing music that achieves a theme or mood in conjunction with whatever is happening on screen, but in the end you're just writing music. There is no right or wrong way to do it, it's all up to you as the composer.
     
  3. Winspear

    Winspear Tom Winspear

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    Check out Eastwest. Also Native Instruments Kontakt and the libraries available for it. I do enjoy some BestService stuff too.
     
  4. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    I've done so for my own games, and also once for a retro-style game someone else made.

    Modern games usually use mp3s or the like, so you can record normally, like you would for any other song, just take into consideration that at the very end of the file, the audio should be able to loop seamlessly.

    As for making midi files, I don't think it makes any difference which software you use. I've used Microsoft Session (from the 1980s) plenty, since it's what I'm used to using and nothing in midi has changed in the past 30+ years.
     
  5. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    "Video game music" can mean so many things that it's hard to recommend anything without more to go on. I recently had to make some loops for a game, and I did most of them with just Reaper and built in plugins - ReaSynth to generate some tones, there's a js plugin to generate white noise, then just composed some midi and mixed like you would anything else. Made for a fun day.
     
  6. Maybrick

    Maybrick SS.org Regular

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    Excellent, thanks - I will do.


    I did think that it was pretty vague when I posted the question but I hoped the Jeremy Soule and WoW reference would at least point towards some stuff.

    I've got Reaper too so I'll give ReaSynth a try.
     
  7. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    ^ I completely missed the references. I can't read apparently. :lol:
     
  8. Seybsnilksz

    Seybsnilksz SS.org Regular

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    I am studying video game music at the moment. Just having some sample libraries like Kontakt or Eastwest and maybe some synth can be great. I just recently got into some synth programming, starting with basics on Retrologue (comes free with Cubase), and then I bought Serum. Great synth with great visualisation of what is actually happening.

    If you don't have a game, you could try FMOD. You can create your own parameters and practise making interactive music. You just need to come up with some virtual scenarios (for example: opening a door triggers another part in the song), and then simulate that in FMOD without having to make a real game with a door in it. There are some good tutorials on the official FMOD Youtube-channel.
     
  9. TheHandOfStone

    TheHandOfStone E♭M7(♭5)

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    I've written "video game music" in GP5/GP6 and exported it as .wav files. :lol:
     

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