Worth it to upgrade to protools?

Discussion in 'Recording Studio' started by will_shred, Sep 23, 2017.

  1. will_shred

    will_shred not that good.

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    I've been using Reaper for the entire time I've been recording, but at school all the computers and studios run off Protools. I was thinking about getting protools so I could work on some of my recording projects at home if need be, and bring them into school. But I need more reasons than that to cough up the $300 for a license. What do you guys think?
     
  2. TonyFlyingSquirrel

    TonyFlyingSquirrel Cherokee Warrior

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    I use external studios from time to time for the large room & such to track live drums. Simply bringing a hard drive with my session on it has made for seemless multi venue usage.

    Most larger studios will be loaded with Pro Tools along with other DAWs. I have been on it for close to 3 years now and can't find myself going back to Sonar which I used for about 8 years.
     
  3. KingAenarion

    KingAenarion Resident Studio Nerd

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    Are you studying audio?
     
  4. Descent

    Descent SS.org Regular

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    See if you can buy interface bundled with Pro Fools, that might be cheaper option, especially used.
    If at school you're working and to be tested on Pro Fools, then get it. You might be able to get a cheaper student version, don't know how much they charge nowadays...

    I've been out of the "professional" studio for quite a few years and am currently running Studio One and haven't looked back.
     
  5. Sanrek

    Sanrek SS.org Regular

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    It depends on what you intend to do with it.

    I would say, if it's "only" to be able to work on your school projects at home, only do it if you can have a cheap enough student license (and even, that seems a waste of money/time if you're used to work with Reaper and not going to use Protools afterward)

    That being said, if you're studying to be a recording engineer, it's still the industry standard (although arguably less than what it used to be, I've seen a lot of studio engineers using whatever DAW they like to work with nowadays, Logic, Nuendo, etc. even Cubase or Reaper - of course when not using a HD hardware system) so it's always a good thing to get familiar with it on top of your lessons.

    If you want a DAW for composing/recording your own stuff, just try as many as you can and pick the one that works for YOU, without any other considerations.

    My 2 cents :) .
     
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  6. billinder33

    billinder33 SS.org Regular

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    The DAW isn't your primary compatibility issue. You can export project files easily to transfer tracks from and to any DAW. You 2 main considerations are:

    1) VSTs you own vs what the other studio(s) own. You're going to have to print these effects to tape if the school/studio has one that you don't, or vice vera.
    2) ProTools workflow. Do you need it on your home system to get better familiar with the features so that you're faster/more knowledgeable when you're in the school's or another's studio. If so, then it may be worth the money. See if you can get the student discount.

    I used to use Protools. Personally, I greatly prefer Reaper. If I needed to mix in a PT studio as an occasional one off event, I'd prep everything locally in Reaper and then export. If using and integrating with PT studios was something I was going to have to do all the time, then I would consider migrating to it.
     
  7. buriedoutback

    buriedoutback SS.org Regular

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    I'm a Reaper user, so forgive the ignorance here... would Pro Tools First work? apparently it's free. You could print effects/plugins at school and then have the printed tracks for use at home?
     
  8. Drew

    Drew Forum MVP

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    About the only reason to buy Pro Tools if you're already happy with Reaper is, as you point out, if you're going to be spending a lot of time sending projects back and forth between your home computer and your studio computer, and even then you can't simply just save down with embedded audio and open on a new machine, unless you have the same VSTs saved in the same directory, etc.

    If you're getting into pro audio recording as a career, and you can get a good student discount, it might be worth it. If you're planning on working on your own and project compatibility is only a concern for the rest of the time you're in school, then really any good DAW (and I consider Reaper one) will work just as well as any other once you're familiar with its workflow, so I wouldn't bother.
     
  9. Descent

    Descent SS.org Regular

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    Using multiple DAWs is a huge pain though, I've done it on quite a few occasions, moving projects from tracking stages (Pro Tools) from a studio to Sonar, CUbase, etc. for mixing at home. It might look feasible at first then once you get into the big 90+ track project you just want to commit suicide :)

    If you're serious about being a studio engineer, think of all the time and headache saved for *somewhat* measly $300.
     
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