What makes a guitar good?

Discussion in 'Beginners/FAQ' started by Reignerrr, Jul 6, 2018.

  1. Reignerrr

    Reignerrr SS.org Regular

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    yes, there's a little buzz
     
  2. Demiurge

    Demiurge Intrepid Jackass

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    ^Okay- now we're getting somewhere. Is it coming from the strings ringing-out unplugged or is it when it's plugged-in? What's the make & model?

    If the former, it could be from nut slots being too wide for the string, a defect in a bridge saddle, or, if the action is particularly low, uneven frets (this is not a complete list).

    If it's the latter, it can be a bit more complex. Now, if you're playing with distortion, there's always going to be a little bit of background noise. If it goes beyond that, there could be an issue with grounding in the guitar, a ground loop in the signal chain, or some sort of outside interference, to name a few. What's your signal chain? Do you have another guitar and do you have the same issue?
     
  3. Reignerrr

    Reignerrr SS.org Regular

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    there's buzzing with the guitar unplugged, and a little with high gain, maybe it is normal, i use only ampsims like the poulin lecto

    there's low action in this guitar set from factory, the nut holes seem to have just the space for the string
     
  4. Kaura

    Kaura #Make:cool:SmileyCoolAgain

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    Obviously its dj0nting ability.
     
  5. Demiurge

    Demiurge Intrepid Jackass

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    What kind of guitar is it and what type of bridge? Is it buzzing with open strings only or fretted at a certain position? Does raising the action help?

    I mean, the factory setup could have been just a tad too low and the strings are catching the frets uniformly OR one fret is taller than the others.
     
  6. Yash94

    Yash94 SS.org Regular

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    It's, of course, the playability and sound.
    Sound - good woods, paired with the right pickups and hardware.
    Playability - A well-made neck, good fretwork, a comfortable neck joint, and the right bridge for your hand.

    Me - still discovering. I am pretty happy with the classic Alder, Maple, Ebony + EMG + Floyd Rose combination. Jackson and ESP. Soon gonna try the Poplar, Maple, Ebony + Duncan JB + Kahler fixed combination :)
     
  7. Reignerrr

    Reignerrr SS.org Regular

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    it's the jackson js22-7, the bridge is fixed (not floyd), the buzz is there from the first to the 16th fret, the first fret it's super low but in the 16 there's a big space so it is weird to have buzz also right there...


    so what will be the best pickups for poplar body? i have in mind the pegasus, x2n, titan, juggernauts, i've read a lot but i'm still lost and i can't go to a store to try, there's no stores with all this alternatives here
     
  8. Zoobiedood

    Zoobiedood SS.org Regular

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    Poplar is a strange one for me. I have a Music Man made out of it, and it is the most mid-heavy guitar I've ever played. I had to get severely scooped pickups (Custom 5, Jazz) to get it to sound how I like. It is a great guitar now, but I went through a lot of pickups before I realized the body was preventing the pickups I initially chose from sounding the way they should.
     
  9. Reignerrr

    Reignerrr SS.org Regular

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    so putting the nazgul o something with a lot of mids here will be a big mistake right? cuz i don't like super mid tones
     
  10. stevexc

    stevexc Contributor

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    IF the piece of poplar that guitar is made out of lends to a mid-heavy instrument, you'd be best to avoid any pickups that have a large mid focus if you don't like mid-heavy tones.

    That said I'd avoid the Nazgul altogether if I were you as it is such a mid-heavy pickup.
     
  11. Yash94

    Yash94 SS.org Regular

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    Depends on what you want, I think. I'm no pickup guru. If in doubt, just go with the classic versatile combination with poplar - use the Seymour Duncan JB4 (in the bridge). Megadeth used it for the best part of their career (1990-2004), both Dave Mustaine and Marty Friedman during his whole tenure in Megadeth. For the neck, you can try the Jazz, Alnico II Pro, 59, JB, depends on what sound you're looking for.
     
  12. GuitarBizarre

    GuitarBizarre Listen to physics.

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    I'm just here to do the obligatory "Tonewood is bullshit" post.

    The type and structure of the wood you choose for your guitar doesn't matter. There's no such thing as "The open pores in swamp ash comb the midrange" and there's no "Mahogany is a warm wood". It's just not a thing.

    What *does* matter is mass and rigidity. The more of both of these things you have, the more of the energy you put into the string, will stay in the string and thus the longer that string will ring out, and the brighter the guitar will be.

    Ultimately, the differences between different pieces of the SAME WOOD, are usually more dramatic than the differences between "average" pieces of one wood versus another. There is hard mahogany out there, and there is soft maple. I've played extremely bright solid mahogany guitars and extremely warm, almost dull sounding, guitars with Maple necks and basswood or alder bodies.

    More to the point - "Mahogany" is really barely a thing anyway - It's one name that gets applied to dozens of different species of tree. Same goes for lots of woods.

    Don't bother worrying about wood unless it's just for an aesthetic purpose. I have guitars made with lots of different woods, and frankly, while they do sound different, the particular pieces of wood are not the major element of the sound. Bridge, Pickups, Design, the thickness of the neck, etc, all combine to determine well over 90% of the sound. I wouldn't attribute more than 3% of the tone of any of my guitars to the wood they're made of.
     
    couverdure likes this.
  13. Andrew Lloyd Webber

    Andrew Lloyd Webber Super Duper Moduraturr

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    The hard data we need is to measure the dent those facts make in this week’s ss.org tonewood thread against how they affected last week’s, next week’s, and tomorrow’s.

    Speaking of which, I’m soliciting recommendations from our experts: I’m thinking about installing a particular pickup that none of you have personally owned in one of my guitars, but don’t know if it would sound best in my mahogany RG, maple-capped swamp ash Strandberg, or alder strat. Open to all suggestions, here.

    For those eager to nitpick the fact that I haven’t specified any details of the pickup beyond the fact that no one here has personally owned one, I urge you to consider whether that has limited anyone in the past. I assure you, your recommendations and insights will be of no less value nor any more open to falsification than before. If it helps, the pickup is the one primarily used on that record you’ve recently been enjoying, as played by a guitarist that recently inspired you to think about practicing.

    Edit: I should add, the maple cap is a veneer (In case another pickup would be more appropriate). It may be nothing, but some of you guys seem to know a lot about it.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
  14. Zoobiedood

    Zoobiedood SS.org Regular

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    Exactly. Listen to the guitar. What don't you like about it? Are there too many mids? What don't you like about the pickups? My piece of poplar was all mids, but poplar is a strange wood that is all over the EQ spectrum, and the wood is just one aspect of the sound.
     
  15. Reignerrr

    Reignerrr SS.org Regular

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    so if the guitar is heavier in weight (more mass and rigidity) will be better sounding?
     
  16. GuitarBizarre

    GuitarBizarre Listen to physics.

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    Not necessarily. More weight could move resonant frequency around in a way that makes wolf tones pop out. Or if the guitar is designed in such a way that neck and body are separate (like the Bunker Tension Free neck) then you could have weirdness of coinciding resonances. Or you could have a very thin neck on a very heavy body and the neck could be somewhat more flexible than it otherwise would be.

    A tremolo would decouple this somewhat and you'd find yourself tracking down points of energy loss etcetcetc.

    Its not all that simple. That's part of why the "magic wood" voodoo is hard to disprove.

    my point is simply that design and quality of build, quality of joints, quality of hardware etc...those things trump the difference between two pieces of wood in almost all instances. A pickup DEFINITELY sounds different to another pickup, even through distortion.

    On the other hand, through even a slight drive, most "wood" differences are completely undetectable.
     
  17. Reignerrr

    Reignerrr SS.org Regular

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    now i have the eyes in another guitar but i have no clue of the quality of this one.... mmmm soo sexy and beautiful: bc rich warlock lucky 7, and there's not one in my country, i would have to order it
     
  18. BenjaminW

    BenjaminW SS.org Regular

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    If it can either djent or sound good when playing Smoke on the Water, you're in good hands.
     
  19. Vinnymuse

    Vinnymuse SS.org Regular

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    "If it can either djent or sound good when playing Smoke on the Water, you're in good hands."

    This, I'd have to take note of. :)
     
  20. odibrom

    odibrom .

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    ... a guitar is only as good as the connection the player has with it...
     

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