Training to run a 6 minute mile...

Discussion in 'Lifestyle, Health, Fitness & Food' started by Blytheryn, Jun 15, 2016.

  1. Blytheryn

    Blytheryn Musical Adam West

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    Hey guys!

    I am going to take it upon myself to start running. The ultimate goal being to run 1.5 miles in about 9:30 seconds. This is the best time for running the 1.5 mile run which is a physical requirement for the AFROTC program. I am not enrolled in a school yet, but I want to be at my physical peak for when the time comes.

    What are your guy's tips on starting out running? I don't have much experience, and my stamina is piss poor I assume. I lift a lot of weights, but rarely do much cardio. Right now I'm at around 190 lbs and I stand at 6,3, that is to say I'm a pretty big dude.

    My plan is to start running every day. At least the mile and a half, and try and get it faster and faster every time.

    Any of you guys run a lot and care to weigh in on this?

    Thanks.
     
  2. ThePIGI King

    ThePIGI King Death Will Reign

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    When I used to run, we always timed ourselves so that we could try and beat our time the next day when we ran. It also helped to have a buddy (or a lot of them!) to run with because it was friendly competition/encouragement that helped us all improve.

    Set a maximum time that you want (I assume there is a maximum time allowed for the AFROTC) and if you don't beat that time, punish yourself - go run MORE!

    Also, drink lots of water.

    I used to workout with the Army Recruiters around me for a while to help kick me into shape :lol: We did all of these things regularly. Hope this helps!
     
  3. Blytheryn

    Blytheryn Musical Adam West

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    USAF Fitness Program | Military.com

    Basically you get full points for getting a time under 9:32, and subsequently less points until you get zero for running it in like 20 minutes. That's the same for the crunches and pull ups. Weightlifting will help me out on the others, but I really want to kick my ass this summer by running and getting the best time I can. From what I hear everything counts, and everything is also noted by your superiors.

    My dream is to eventually graduate and go on and fly if I can. It's been a boyhood dream, and the way I see it there's no harm in trying your hardest for something you really want to do. :)
     
  4. ThePhilosopher

    ThePhilosopher Reason User Contributor

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    I don't know if this applies to such short distances; but my 5K, 10K, and half marathon times all got noticeably shorter as I began to run longer distances during marathon training. The key to cardio, IMO, is consistency in your training regimen and finding the right plan for your timeline and goal.
     
  5. Blytheryn

    Blytheryn Musical Adam West

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    So I ran the 1.5 mile distance yesterday in about 14 minutes. I couldn't make it all the way so I had to stop about half way and jog/powerwalk for about a minute. All in all, I reckon I'm in better shape than I thought I would be.
     
  6. austink

    austink SS.org Regular

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    I am not a runner, but a cyclist, but I have trained for a 15k and managed to take 2nd at 7000 ft of elevation. These days I run occasionally with my dogs (5 miles give or take).

    First and foremost get good shoes. I highly recommend going to reputable sporting goods store, or better yet a running/tri store and trying on a ton of shoes. If your max distance is less than a 5K you probably don't need heavy support shoes, but given you are fairly heavy it might be worth a try. Many stores will have you run on a treadmill to check your gate etc.

    I would also work on endurance by running further but slower. Try for 3 miles at 10 minute pace or something just to build your aerobic capability.

    You obviously can train specifically for 1.5 miles and never run any more than that,but doing more cardio never hurt anyone. And don't run in a regular cotton t shirt, that is a one way ticket to chafed nipples.
     
  7. extendedsolo

    extendedsolo SS.org Regular

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    I guess my question is what is your body fat percentage? Also have you played any sports that require a lot of running such as basketball/soccer/ lacrosse? also how old are you?

    Not to be a self appointed expert but, I have logged about 20,000 miles over the last 9 years running, so I feel like when I know these things I could help you out quite a bit.

    Also 14 minutes for 1.5 miles is pretty good for someone who says they haven't run much. probably not too far away.
     
  8. Blytheryn

    Blytheryn Musical Adam West

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    I went into a sporting goods store here in Sweden a few days ago and picked up some basic Nike running tights, not too much compression or anything, because I intend to use them in the gym for leg day and such, and a pair of Nike Free Flyknits. I had a pair of Nike Free 5.0's before when I ran a bit last year, and liked them quite a bit.

    Sure, sure. I'm trying to work out maybe if I start running outside maybe 3 times a week, to do longer distances at a slower pace at least once, and train for the 1 mile and 1.5 mile times twice. Good call, get a polyester shirt, or tape my nipples then?


    I haven't done a body fat measurement in quite a while, but I would assume that right now I could possibly be at 14%-16%? I'll upload a picture so that you can get a better idea in a bit. Sportswise, I rowed a bit high school, and have been an okay swimmer. Not at long distances however. I am 20, almost 21 years old.

    I agree, I kind of surprised myself with the time. I was able to run the first 800 meters all in one go, and then I had to pace myself and take small breaks. All in all though, I considered that first run sort of an "orientation" run to see where I was physically. I'll try and get a run in tomorrow before work, and see if I can give you guys a better time.

    EDIT:https://imgur.com/a/DlJC6
     
  9. austink

    austink SS.org Regular

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    Yeah you can tape/put band aides over the nips to prevent chafing. Or just run without a shirt, that is how I do it.
     
  10. Blytheryn

    Blytheryn Musical Adam West

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    Without a shirt it is then. Don't have to tell me twice! :lol:
     
  11. extendedsolo

    extendedsolo SS.org Regular

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    I really think the "long distance" won't help you very much since 1.5 miles would barely be considered long distance. The longest you would need to run IMO is 45 minutes of easy running, which for you should be about 5 miles. A heart rate monitor is great for figuring out where you should be, and it's probably going to feel like you are barely moving. Do the easy run on a leg day.

    The other two days, since you are wanting to get there quicker, is to run probably 200m at about 90% max effort and then jog for 200m. Do that about 10 times 2 times a week. If you want, add in one MAYBE two 400m of the same effort. Throw in a mile warmup and a mile cool down that should be about 5 miles.

    Keep in mind if you are doing deadlifts, squats, etc they will suffer since you will lose some of the explosiveness you need to lift heavy. It's very difficult to get bigger and get faster simultaneously. Do the above for about 4 weeks and then re evaluate.

    Now if you can't run 45 minutes consecutively, just work up to that. Most newbie runners just are running too fast for what should be considered an easy run. Heart rate monitor can help with that.
     
  12. Blytheryn

    Blytheryn Musical Adam West

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    This is awesome, thanks! Do the 1.5 fast run on the leg day, and the others spaced out in the week. I doubt I can for 45 minutes straight, but I will work up to it. Thanks for the advice, you really seem to know what you're talking about. Nutritionwise, should I just keep eating normally, you think, or are there some things to take into account (more carbs the night before longer run?)

    Cheers, man!
     
  13. thraxil

    thraxil cylon

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    Go as slow as you need to at first, walk bits, whatever. Just keep your heart rate up for a solid 45 minutes or so on a regular basis and you'll improve. Less than 20-30 minutes of cardio and you'll see limited benefit (beyond warming you up for more). Then you quickly reach diminishing returns beyond 45 minutes to an hour.
     
  14. austink

    austink SS.org Regular

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    I recon you would be fine with your regular diet. 45 minutes is not enough to deplete glycogen stores. On top of that, carbo loading really needs to be done much earlier than the night before. But that isn't something you need to worry about.
     
  15. extendedsolo

    extendedsolo SS.org Regular

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    Seconded. Adding a banana or two may be beneficial. Or adding a banana 20 minutes before an easy run. Other than that carbo loading is for people running halfs and full marathons and longer at the fastest they can for the distance.

    45 minutes is the best bang for your buck. I wouldn't say diminishing returns as it completely depends on your goal and running fitness already. I'm willing to bet that if he ran 90 minutes a few times a week he would reach his goal not necessarily faster, but he would keep that speed longer in a year or two.

    Keep in mind it should be EASY. Like I said, a heart rate monitor will help you determine how easy feels. You'll get there by doing intervals, but if you stop doing the intervals for speed you'll probably find that you can't run 6 minute miles anymore. What's more is don't get discouraged. There is a little bit of genetics at work here, but your body type looks suited for a 6 minute mile. It took me a couple years to get down to that fast, although I was completely out of shape and fat.
     
  16. Beefmuffin

    Beefmuffin New Boot Goofin

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    A lot of good info here. Something else you may want to look into. Sprinting. Dedicate some time after workouts and what not to do some 50 yard sprints at about 90%+ effort. It will give you tremendous gains in the cardio aspect. Rucking (weighted backpack hikes) can also be done to help with building your leg muscles up and endurance. If you are up for it, you can also Ruck for say a mile or two, and then try running your mile and a half after that. You will be surprised at how much faster your mile time will be because your body gets used to that extra weight quickly. Also resistance running (if you can manage it, due to the equipment requirements) is also a great way to work on that leg strength and get your running form right.
     
  17. Fretless

    Fretless Knob Fiddler Contributor

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    When I did cross country my fastest minute was 5:15, and my average time per lap at a meet was 6 minutes, and most people don't believe me when I tell them how lazy my training was.

    I never did speed training, I thought it was too tiring, and would wear me out rather than build me up (not to mention the risk for injury was far higher), so to train, I jogged in running form at a pace as slow as my walk (trust me form is a huge part of it). I'd run 10+ miles a day doing that, and my mile time dropped steadily. I wasn't the fastest runner, I wasn't trying to be, but I was definitely one of the fastest on my team. It was a comfortable way to train, but definitely took time to build up. Jogging in form even at a slow pace will build muscle memory for that form, and will allow your body to do it very easily, since all you're doing is speeding up the movements.
     
  18. Drew

    Drew Forum MVP

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    Another cyclist here. Running SUCKS, but it's useful cross-training to work muscles I don't use while riding, and work the ones I DO use in different ways (my legs feel better when I've been getting in the occasional run and not just riding nonstop), and it's a good way to get a good workout in a hurry.

    I wouldn't worry about your nipples chafing on a 1.5mi run. I generally run in wicking t-shirts (I've done enough 5k races that give you shirts in "performance" fabrics that I have a good supply) but even if I was out in a cotton t shirt, I'd think you'd need to get up to half marathon distances before that becomes a problem. Just run in whgatever's comfortable.

    Having some way to track your progress is good - you could keep a spreadsheet or a notebook of distances and times, but there are also a whole bunch of good aps for this. I use Strava, which is more cycling focused but has pretty good support for runners as well, but there are a number of other aps that let you track distance, speed, time, and location while you run so you can see how you're progressing.

    Other than that, stretch afterwards, expect the first couple runs to leave you sore as hell when you finish but it'll get easier with time, and just keep doing it. 5k is a pretty good distance, IMO, and for a run like what you're training for, it means on "race day" you can step it up and hammer, because you're used to more than twice the distance. Mix up longer, slower runs (5k, 10k, whatever) with shorter, faster "interval" runs. Afterwards, Bananas, or anything rich in potassium, help with the sore muscles, as does massage.

    Really, though, when it comes to getting faster, training is like practicing anything else. Go out and do it. The more you do anything the better you get.
     
  19. Chewy5150

    Chewy5150 SS.org Regular

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    I've been a runner/jogger for a few years now. About 2 years ago I bought a garmin training watch and it was a great investment especially when keeping track of my personal progress. Other than that drink water, watch your diet, stretch a lot, and find ways to increase your stamina/endurance (like HIIT type stuff or just running through more challenging hilly areas)
     
  20. MikeH

    MikeH Bring the gain

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    In on running/AFROTC thread. I'm in the same boat, though I'm already in the Air Force, but trying to commission. My last PT test, I scored an 88.7 with a max on waist measurement, max pushups, max situps, and a horrible run time of 12:23. I partly contribute that to choosing to do my PT test at 10am in San Antonio in the middle of June, so it was already 95 degrees by the time I started running. The key, really, is to just run more. Get used to the environment you're going to be running in, if possible. If you're going to OTS, you'll be in Alabama, so low elevation, humid, and a bit warm. If you plan on going to the Academy, you'll be in Colorado, so high elevation, less humidity, cooler temps. I've been incorporating a lot more cardio into my workout regimen, and in 2 months have went from a 12:23 on a rubber track, and just ran a 12:06 on a dirt track in 103 degree heat, after working 10 hours in the same heat. I'm going to put myself at sub-12 on a fresh day in the early morning. I not only run, but do longer bike rides, hit the elliptical, versa ladder (look it up, they're terrible), and row machine. I also change up how I run on different days. Some days, I'll go for the 1.5 mile, others I'll do sprints, as well as distance running (2.5+ miles). Best of luck! Hopefully we'll both be butter bars soon.
     

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