The realities of socialized health care: share your experiences

Discussion in 'Politics & Current Events' started by russmuller, May 24, 2016.

  1. narad

    narad SS.org Regular

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    Agreed. I injured my knee lifting while in the US for a couple months, and while I technically had insurance I knew it'd be such a hassle to work it out in that brief period while I was there. So I just took some time off, hoping it wasn't anything serious. 2 years later my knee still clicks and grinds up stairs even after 6 months of free UK physio :-/

    Preventable if I had convenient coverage and saw someone immediately? I'll always wonder.

    I think that also goes to this point I hear occasionally: because the US plan seems rigged against early detection and prevention, we pay great premiums for the costly treatment that attempt to undo that damage. Seems like a sensible criticism.
     
  2. coreysMonster

    coreysMonster So long, Germany!

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    Lived in Germany nearly all my life. Gotta say it was a very uneasy feeling to come to the USA and have to worry about not being able to go to the doctor. It's just another thing on top of every thing else to worry about. "I can't afford to go to the doctor" is a thought that never even crossed my mind before coming here, and it's IMO one of the biggest flaws of this country. Having to decide to not get vital treatment because of the cost is such a foreign concept it seems like it's from a century ago.

    Also, the idea of chronically ill people having to pay even MORE money just to stay alive because of their medication. So many people just fighting to have the bare minimum needed to survive, it's obscene.
     
  3. flint757

    flint757 SS.org Regular

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    Yup, it sucks. My insurance is changing for the worse and my pay is dropping. Technically if I get a surgery I need done before October my old deductible will be applied, but I can't even sort of afford it right now. After October I'll have to pay it almost entirely out of pocket, which I also cannot afford. Rock meet hard place. So I'll likely have to put off a surgery I desperately need until a year or two from now when my financial situation is hopefully a bit better.
     
  4. chopeth

    chopeth SS.org Regular

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    Hold on, mate. I know by experience it's terrible enough to endure a health condition, let alone not being able to economically handle it. That health care system is utterly absurd in the "first world" to me.
     
  5. anunnaki

    anunnaki Sevenstring Noob

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    I enjoy not ever having to pay for medicine or seeing a doctor, and I take some kinda expensive medicine so it works out well for me.

    One thing I'm not happy about is wait times. I've been waiting 6 months to get an appointment to arrange some tests to be done to find out if I can get a surgery I want, and I'm on a waiting list, but apparently the responsible doctor is on leave as well, so who knows when I'll get seen.

    On the other hand, the surgery I want would cost about £10k on private healthcare so financially it's worth the wait I guess
     
  6. Jzbass25

    Jzbass25 SS.org Regular

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    My dad died because he didn't have the money to go to the doctor to get his checkups especially when he was feeling "off." When he was having his heart attack (we weren't sure what was happening) he didn't even want to go to the hospital because of the bill.

    I have a chronic condition and it costs me more than I afford and absolutely nothing is helping me, there are a few medicines and treatments that I haven't tried though but it is because my insurance (which I can barely afford, I'm literally selling off anything I can nowadays) won't pay for it.

    In HS I was going for top schools but my disability just destroyed my ability to do that, I had A's but I would have failed out of places like MIT and I had no extra curricular activities. Nowadays my professors were saying I should be looking at great jobs at Microsoft and Google but after they realized how bad my disability actually is they're like oh maybe look at these other small places that aren't as stressful (I worry I can't work at all). I have no safety nets for anything, I just have to keep doing my best in basically constant pain or a constant disabled state or I guess become a bum?

    I wish I had at least a hope that I would get healthcare that might help me. Just getting medicaid in my state would possibly get me a treatment that could change my life but that won't happen probably.
     
  7. angus

    angus SS.org Regular

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    What is it you want that you aren't getting? I'm not seeing anything in your story that suggests you can't get access (I work in medicine). You might just need to figure out who to go to and how to navigate your insurance.
     
  8. KnightBrolaire

    KnightBrolaire 8 string hoarder

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    knee injuries are horrible just due to the minimal blood flow to the tissues. The ligaments and tendons of the knee are pretty avascular. The clicking and grinding is called crepitus fyi. I was doing a muay thai fight and my opponent kicked me in the side of the knee repeatedly, I could barely walk for 3 months, still felt pain after 6 months. The doctor told me that knee injuries can take over a year to heal up :/
     
  9. fps

    fps Kit

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    Lol, *socialised*, terrible term for it.

    Here in the UK, it's a wonderful service, it makes total sense and once you have it, the idea of it not being there seems cruel and stupid. The quality of care is generally very high, although there are still issues, and what can be done for the most vulnerable, as a basic right, is something that makes me very, very proud to be British.

    The negatives are, as with anything, that people want a piece of the pie, so there are currently too many middle managers who do nothing and the service has become bloated. A very determined government is currently, slightly too brutally, cutting away at this, in a way that is affecting frontline services but not getting rid of enough of those cushy pen pusher jobs that are the problem.
     
  10. buffa d

    buffa d SS.org Regular

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    I see social benefits as a great system. If you are sick you have to go see a doctor and it would be wrong to take that away from someone. Of course there are also private hospitals, which offer the same services in a faster and nicer package.

    However, this kind of a system always brings a metric f-ton of bureaucracy which is ridiculous.

    I know that socialized healthcare is not for everybody since it would be a huge structural change for any society. It would require a lot more money from the government itself, which basically means raising taxes.
    Here's the fun part: I actually don't mind paying taxes because I can personally see what I get out of it - Health care, free education (I know it's not free due to high taxes but we actually get paid to study) unemployment benefits etc.

    This means: No homeless people, high education rate, free health care.
    This also means: Lot of paper work, more power to the government since they own more than the average nation, dumb rules.

    My wife moved to Finland from the US and I can tell for sure that we wouldn't have been financially stable without the benefits she gets (even as an American citizen). So with this in mind

    I think one of the main reasons why this system is overlooked is that it's considered socialism, which especially for Americans is a big no-no. I've had my fare share of anger from my wife's family's side for living in a socialist country :wallbash: I guess I might have to remind them about the benefits she is getting haha.

    I feel the wealthiest should help the ones who don't have the same income. People don't choose to be poor. Otherwise the population gets more and more polarized between two socioeconomic groups which can lead to severe tensions in the long run.
     
  11. tedtan

    tedtan SS.org Regular

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    In the US, when people hear the word socialism, most immediately jump to thinking of Marxist socialism and USSR style communism. If you can make the distinction between that and European style socialism, and the person you're speaking with is still listening, you might have a better discussion. But good luck with that - hatred of communism runs pretty deep, so most people here won't bother listening if they can make the mental jump to communism.
     
  12. StevenC

    StevenC SS.org Regular

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    This morning I went in for an X Ray and consultation. I left with an MRI appointment and the option of surgery. All for free.

    I'm quite happy with the healthcare I receive.
     
  13. CapnForsaggio

    CapnForsaggio Cap'n (general)

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    Nothing is FREE.

    Don't be a rube.

    Everyone ELSE is paying for it, at far above market value. AND, they don't have a choice.
     
  14. StevenC

    StevenC SS.org Regular

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    Not really. The UK government spends far less per capita on healthcare than the US government, for example, so I wouldn't say far above market value. And while it's paid for by my and everyone else's taxes, I don't have any bills to pay or take out a loan to stay alive. I'd say that's on the money saved end of free.
     
  15. mongey

    mongey SS.org Regular

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    There is also the argument that access to free , or cheap , healthcare means people use it more often and are healthier overall ass problems get caught earlier . costing less on hospital costs in the long run
     
  16. buffa d

    buffa d SS.org Regular

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    Yes this is exactly what I mean. :yesway:
    It is so deeply rooted in the culture that people associate it with communism without even knowing what it actually means.
    Funny enough, this could also be solved with a proper level of education, which is ridiculously expensive in some countries.
     
  17. AxeHappy

    AxeHappy SS.org Regular

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    If we determine Market Value based off what the US is paying then they're paying way below market value. Also, since the cost is spread across everyone each person is paying less then they otherwise would.


    I'm glad I live in a society where most people think everyone chipping in to provide access to basic quality of life is a good thing. It's almost like, that is the entire point of cilivisation.
     
  18. UnderTheSign

    UnderTheSign SS.org Regular

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    A thread full of good posts in support of socialised healthcare, and you had to return to PC&E with this? :rolleyes:

    Like I've said before, my health insurance is less than 100 a month and I even get part of that back so it's below 50 realistically. My income tax is 36% and I'm sure some of that goes to healthcare as well. I'll happily pay that if that means everyone gets to to to the doctor without worrying about the costs. If that makes me a commie, get me one of those fancy warm hats because I'll take it and wear it with pride.
     
  19. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    Hmm, I work full time. I live and work in the USA. I have an issue, where I live, that even though I am in a town full of doctors, it's the only town with doctors in the greater area, so everyone else comes here for medical care.

    First issue is that I cannot find a doctor who will even make an appointment to see me. And I'm not joking, I've tried several doctors, each several times, over the past nearly seven years I've lived here. The standard answer is "We are not taking new patients." When I broke down and asked what I was supposed to do, the standard answer is "Go to the emergency room." Every time I have been sick enough to need antibiotics or hurt enough to need stitches or to check a bone for a break, I've had to go to the ER.

    Every time I go to the ER, the waiting room is mostly full, and I have to wait over an hour. And then I get a bill for several hundred dollars, and that's after insurance covers a majority of it.

    So this model is not feasible.

    Is socialized healthcare to blame for me not getting primary care doctor? No. But my experience with paying the bill is no better than what I would have to deal with before. Where things differ is that my past employers, who did not offer healthcare benefits, now have to do so, but I already wised up and quit those jobs to get one with better benefits, so I'm largely unaffected.

    I still say that we've approached reforming the industry from the wrong angle. Maybe it's not a bad angle to approach, but it's a bad angle for the initial approach, because it does not address the root of the problem.

    In any problem solving situation, you need to first define the problem, and, rather than defining the problem as healthcare is too expensive, we approached it as people without jobs cannot afford healthcare. I think that was too narrow, and it took us in a direction that was less effective than it should have been.

    In the EU, healthcare costs are not great, but they are hands down better than they are in the USA. Is it because the government pays more or is it because the healthcare industry bills less, or a combination of those and other factors?
     
  20. Pablo

    Pablo Resident Wanker

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    I think the answer to this question is fairly obvious: over here, you buy health care at cost (through taxes), wheras in the US you buy that same service from a provider, that adds a profit margin, which is usually paid through an insurance company, that also adds a profit margin...
     

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