The Crossroads Of First ERG Destiny

Discussion in 'Beginners/FAQ' started by MiahDrao, Jun 23, 2016.

  1. MiahDrao

    MiahDrao SS.org Regular

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    You have probably observed me relentlessly asking questions about Agiles and praising the Kiesel/Carvin multiscales, and it might appear as though I were ready to buy 50+ guitars :nuts: (extreme hyperbole, but bear with me). However confident I may seem when asking about these guitars, I honestly have no idea which 8-string I actually plan to buy. Like the usual "first guitar trap" that many new players fall into, I'm confronted with too many options. I've decided to narrow them down to 4, and I constantly vacillate between all of them. I'm gonna list my 4 ideas and what I find to be pros and cons of each. I'd like feedback on the option that will be the best bang for my buck, as I'm really trying to spend as little as possible. I'm also open to more ideas. My budget would be an unmoving maximum of $1.5K. And even then, I'm still gonna wait until I feel financially stable to pull the trigger. :nono: So I have a lot of time before I decide.

    1) Ibanez M80M

    PROS:
    - Just about all the specs I'd look for are in this guitar (which is why I'm listing it first): 8 strings, scale length of 29.4", and an ash body.
    - The Lundgren M8 pup is a serious bonus
    - The placement of the bridge pickup is the best I've ever seen on a production model.
    - Ibanez neck profiles are most comfortable to me.
    - I love the FX Edge iii bridge.

    CONS:
    - This is the ceiling of my budget, and it will take more time to save $$.
    - The fact that this is a signature instrument really bothers me. It won't ever feel like it will be "mine," which is kinda silly. I could probably get over it.
    - I hear the finish is rather flimsy. I might end up getting a pick-guard in the future.

    2) Agile Production Models

    PROS:
    - The least expensive option of the 4.
    - Easier to find the specs that I'd like.
    - I could mod these instruments to my liking (although I've never modified an instrument before...)

    CONS:
    - The limits of Rondo's inventory. I could see myself just settling for something that I find the best out of what they have at a given time, but not what I really want.
    - It's really difficult to choose since the pictures of the instruments aren't always what they actually look like.
    - Inconsistency on their quality control (yes, I do know about their return policy, but it's a con nonetheless). Some people get the best instruments they've ever played; others get lemons.
    - I rarely find ash-bodied guitars in their inventory.
    - The veneer tops are not that great.

    3) Semi-Custom Agile

    PROS:
    - I spec this out exactly to my liking: scale length (preferably 30"), ash body, passive pickups, etc.
    - I can leave out the neck pickup for no extra charge.

    CONS:
    - The price more than doubles for an instrument having the specs that I want rather than better quality.
    - That awkward moment when you realize the price is frighteningly close to that of a custom Kiesel/Carvin after you've spec'd it out.
    - The waiting period is something I could get through, but it would be the longest.

    4) Kiesel Aries Multiscale 8

    PROS:
    - Tons of amazing aesthetic options for a decent price.
    - Multiscale is plus, but not something I've been dying to use. However, their multiscale models have a longer scale length than by .5", which is why I'd choose the fanned frets over the perpendicular. And it would be a new experience that I may like a lot more than I think I will.
    - Possibly the best overall quality of all these options.
    - The waiting period is significantly shorter than that of a semi-custom Agile.

    CONS:
    - The scale length. Yes, people complain about this a lot. It probably gets old for you more experienced ERG-ists. For me, there is serious appeal to longer scale for advantages in string tension.
    - Multiscale is a pro and con. It's more expensive than the perpendicular-fret Aries 8 just for adding .5" on the bass side. Is it worth it?
    - Considering that I'm likely going to put on a .090 gauge string on this or even bigger, I don't want to end up having to file and drill stuff on a really quality instrument. This is more of minor issue.

    Again, I'm just looking for the most I can get for the least amount of money. Other info that could be useful: I plan to tune to EADGCFAD, sound > aesthetics, and I'm looking for something more quality than a low-end Ibanez or Schecter that are priced in the Agile range. Maybe it's too soon to think about this; I don't know. :scream: The prices are all over the board, so I'd like some direction.
     
  2. kindsage

    kindsage SS.org Regular

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    Agile is the BEST bang for your buck especially if its your first ERG. I see you live in the US too so you won't be taking any risk (but you already knew that)

    My Agile 828 came cherry. Got it set up by a tech LAST YEAR and changed strings 3 times, no exaggeration, and the intonation is still almost perfect. I've barely touched the saddles, and haven't touched the truss rod at all.

    I popped a set of Lundgren M8's in there and couldn't be happier. The scale length is perfect for drop F.

    I Imagine the 30" should be great for your octave-down standard tuning.

    There's a Silver Burst Agile Septor Elite 830 on sale at rondo right now. Drop in a set of Lundgren M8's and be happy with all the money you saved.
     
  3. that short guy

    that short guy SS.org Regular

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    I own a carvin DC800 and also use a .090. I didn't have to drill or file anything. That being said I'm almost certain anything bigger and you would have to
     
  4. Alex Kenivel

    Alex Kenivel Psycho, dont engage

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    First off, you can reach that tuning on a scale less than 30" no problem. That being said, my first 8 was and still is my Agile Intrepid 830 Pro. I wanted to tune DADGCFAD for a band I was in at the time so I figured I'd get the longest scale I could get.

    I play it in standard drop E now and I kinda wished I got a shorter scale. I had problems with tension and gauges. I still can't fully wrap my head around it and I may explain it wrong (MaxOfMetal explained it to me back then but I forgot how it went) but when there's more length for a vibrating string, it's gonna have less percieved tension, and still seem floppy because all of the length. It's a constant battle of physics and technique.

    Now that that's all out of the way, my Agile was far from a lemon, is super solid, and because of the scale length, I don't ever have to unwind strings or drill tuning pegs because the (Kalium) strings taper just at the right spot
     
  5. MiahDrao

    MiahDrao SS.org Regular

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    ^^^ That's very interesting about the scale being too long. You use a 0.090 for your lowest string (pitch-wise), right? The 28.625" is a decent length, but I kinda wanna go big or go home on this one. But, as you mentioned, I suppose scale length doesn't solve every problem.
     
  6. Jacksonluvr636

    Jacksonluvr636 SS.org Regular

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    I'd say save up and buy the one you want.

    If you don't like the Agile (I didn't like mine) then you still may sit there like damn, I should have got the high quality guitar, end up selling the Agile for a loss and it will cost you more in the long run.
     

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