Second axe, same pickups or different?

Discussion in 'Pickups, Electronics & General Tech' started by tuttermuts, Sep 25, 2017.

  1. tuttermuts

    tuttermuts SS.org Regular

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    Like the title says I'm getting close to talks with my luthier to start my second 7 string.
    One thing I'm wondering is: these two guitars are going to function for the same bands, now naturally speaking I'd think a second guitar should be a little different, just to have more options come recording time. But how different?

    Number 1 has a D-sonic bridge and an air northon in the neck. I love the sounds I'm getting.

    Since I'm playing orchestral black mostly nowadays, I've been thinking about those new seymour duncans they've been putting out (the black winter, nasgul,...) but maybe the difference would be too big? (say switching halfway a set) How do you guys go about this?
     
  2. larsmul

    larsmul SS.org Regular

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    Hi ! It depends on the construction of the guitar as well , if the woods are different the same pickups won't sound the same . The hard bit is that you like the sound of your guitar so you don't have a direction to make it different ; brighter ? more bass ? more precision ?
    Anyway if you go with Seymour even with the same wood it will be different ; I like the SH-5 custom bridge and the SH-10 Full shred neck .
     
  3. DudeManBrother

    DudeManBrother Blames it on "the rain"

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    I think every guitar deserves its own pickups; unless it’s primary function is as a backup to your number 1.
    I used to ask our old guitarist why he bought new guitars with similar/same wood combos, active EMGs, and all setup in drop C. They never inspired anything different because they all sounded, felt, and basically looked the same.
     
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  4. KnightBrolaire

    KnightBrolaire 8 string hoarder

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    If you want to play black metal then yeah, the black winters will do that no problem. If you go with the nazgul then I'd recommend some darker sounding woods like mahogany or koa to balance the bright/shrill voicing. nazguls are kind of picky about the guitar/setup they go into. Black winters work well in darker woods too, but they can work in brighter sounding guitars as well. Personally I love having different pickups in different guitars since then it gives me a lot of tonal options, plus I need a way to justify keeping multiple guitars :D
     
  5. KailM

    KailM SS.org Regular

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    I'm a proponent of using different pickups in different guitars -- especially if you're recording. In a live setting I think the pickups would have to be VERY different for you to notice any detrimental effects when switching guitars.

    I can vouch for both the Black Winter and the Nazgul in a black metal setting, as that is what I play too, primarily. I typically tune to C# Standard and D Standard on 6-string guitars, FWIW. I also used to have a D Sonic in another guitar (I also loved that pickup).

    IMO the Black Winter will be more similar to your Dimarzio than a Nazgul, but still quite different and in my opinion superior for the genre. I found the D Sonic best for thrashy, chunky chord work -- it's a really tight pickup but still manages to stay thick and warm. Lots of chunk, that's for sure. But with the BW, you get that chunk as well, but the mids and highs are more ferocious and pissed off. It is an amazing pickup, and hands down my favorite.

    In my other guitar I've got a Nazgul and it also sounds great in a black metal context. It is clearer than the BW and tighter, but doesn't sound quite as huge. I like my black metal to be riffy and sometimes delve into a more death metalish style with tremelo picking on the lowest strings with or without palm muting. The Nazgul is flat-out the most savage sounding pickup I've ever heard for that kind of stuff. Finally, the leads I get out of the Nazgul are incredible-- they cut through a dense, violent mix with ease and sound surprisingly smooth and warm.

    I've been mixing the two pickups on my latest recordings and I have to say, the two combined are even better than one or the other. I can post clips if you're interested.
     
  6. tuttermuts

    tuttermuts SS.org Regular

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    Kailm: I'd love to hear some samples! Still looking around but the black winter does stay interesting. Kinda looking at the Dimarzio super distortion also...so many pickups to choose from...and I haven't even chosen woods yet.
     
  7. KailM

    KailM SS.org Regular

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    This first sample was quad-tracked on rhythms -- Two of the Nazgul on the left, and two of the Black Winter on the right. The first little bit of lead playing is the Nazgul, the second bit at around 1:30 is the BW bridge.https://soundcloud.com/kailm-1/spiritual-warfare-master-3-mixtest-5-27-17

    This one is pure Black Winter; bridge on all rhythms and some leads, neck on all the cleans (or maybe I had both pups selected -- I can't remember, haha): https://soundcloud.com/kailm-1/the-gathering-of-hostsfist-of-the-heavens

    And this one is also pure Black Winters, but more of a death metal tone using an HM-2 on everything except the intro (you can hear the HM-2 kick in at 1:40): https://soundcloud.com/kailm-1/ur-avgrunden-han-stiger-v-20
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2017
  8. Dabo Fett

    Dabo Fett SS.org Regular

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    As others have said, unless it's supposed to only be a back up in case of string breakage/mechanical issues you should throw something different in there. My co-guitarist usually plays the same mode with the same pickups and will use the same guitar the whole set. I like to switch it up and have multiple tones and shapes and feels, and switch in and out between the two. They're close enough that I could play the whole set with one guitar, but each guitar adds its own print to the song and helps to shape the atmosphere and feel of each individual song.

    That being said, the same guitar made with the same woods and same electronics can still sound different. Might have to use different pickups to fine tune the tones to match
     
  9. tuttermuts

    tuttermuts SS.org Regular

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    Kalim: thx for the clips! I've been listening to them every now and then (gotta do my research in little bits and pieces lately)

    Currently not really sure what it'll end up being, but the Black winters are still a strong contender. I'll let you guys know, heck this guitar will have it's own pic thread on here anyway :)
     
  10. tuttermuts

    tuttermuts SS.org Regular

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    Last night went over to talk woods:

    Mahogany neckthrough with wenge stripes.
    Magonany wings with wenge top.
    Ebony fretboard, possibly with stainless steel frets.

    I think that should be a very interesting combination of sounds (and looks!). Overal a little darker then the previous one I think?
     
  11. Drew

    Drew Forum MVP

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    This, absolutely. I have different guitars for different purposes, and I've never really gotten the point of having guitars that sound as identical as you can make them, unless you specifically need a backup for live performance.

    Barring that one instance, what's the point of even having the second guitar, if it sounds exactly like the first? Expand your palate.
     
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