Rung out note clarity.

Discussion in 'Recording Studio' started by akaikitsune, May 16, 2018.

  1. akaikitsune

    akaikitsune SS.org Regular

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    What is the best way to achieve clear note clarity whilst ringing out notes in a chord? When I try to record rung out notes, my mixes sound a bit messy and it's hard to hear each individual note.
     
  2. gienek

    gienek SS.org Regular

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    Depends, what gear do you have?
     
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  3. Hollowway

    Hollowway Extended Ranger

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    If it's a distorted guitar, reduce the gain from what you'd normally play with. Recorded guitars don't need as much gain to sound distorted. That will reduce the saturation, and clean up the sound quite a bit. If it's a dissonant interval chord, you could also record the notes separately, and make sure the tuning is spot on. Often, with equal temperament, notes aren't spot on, and you can hear the beating if the chord rings for a while.
     
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  4. akaikitsune

    akaikitsune SS.org Regular

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    I am using a Strandberg OS6 with Fishman fluence pickups through BIAS FX. I was going for the neck pickup to try and get these rung out notes to pop out. It just sounds a bit muddy. I see players like Ola Englund and Keith Merrow who often play riffs with rung out chords and you can hear everything pretty spot on.
    I think Holloway is right, I should try lowering the gain a bit. Maybe bost some mids?
     
  5. gienek

    gienek SS.org Regular

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    Get sure your interface have high impedation + use short cables. Also, i dont think that whole BIAS marketing is 100% trustful.

    EDIT: Omg, you have actives so this is not apropriete for your gear. Try using standard microphone input instead? Also, maybe your pickup is too high? Boosting amp can worsen the situation
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2018
  6. rezafelayati

    rezafelayati self-claimed ERG nerd

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    try to reduce your gain and play with EQ

    or if you are recording a big chord, the way I do it is separate the chord into two part. Record the lower notes and the higher notes separatelt. From my experience, it creates a better clarity
     
  7. USMarine75

    USMarine75 Doc McStuffins Contributor

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    Already mentioned above... turn down your gain and more importantly, turn down your guitar vol knob to at least 7. A big part of clarity comes from not slamming your input pregain section.

    You can also try lowering the neck pickup height overall, or at least the bass side.

    Neck pickups are also inherently more muddy sounding than the bridge or middle. Try using a middle setting if you have it. Lastly, you can use your bridge pickup, but roll off your tone knob to around 5-ish (varies depending on guitar), roll your volume to 7-ish, and pick close to your highest frets not near the bridge. I have a one pickup Collings P90 (bridge only) and I can get tons of tones, including jazzy neck pickup sounds, doing exactly this.

    Also, with the Fluence pickups experiment with the lower gain and/or differently EQ'd voices (like the Modern, KSE, and DT models have).
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2018
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  8. akaikitsune

    akaikitsune SS.org Regular

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    Thank you so much guys! It is great that there are so many helpful people here. I turned off the TSE I was using to cut the gain, rolled my tone knob down to 5 and picked above the neck pickup. The clarity difference to what I was doing before is huge! I can hear each note a lot more clearly now and it sounds beautiful!
     
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  9. JohnIce

    JohnIce Singlecoil Enthusiast

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    There are a few things you can do that have nothing to do with amp settings, but achieve clarity.
    - Don't play thirds. If you must, then use voicings that put them an octave higher than the root and fifth. Open chords and regular barre chords don't work well with distorsion, that's why power chords have become so popular. Thirds always sound out of tune in order to make fourths and fifths sound IN tune, it's just the nature of straight frets. Distorsion makes this garbling of notes worse. That's why jazz is played with a clean tone :) Using a second guitar, keyboard or a vocal melody to do the thirds, 7ths etc. are a great way to add flavour to the chords without reducing clarity in the distorted guitar.
    - Don't fret or pick too hard, causing notes to sway in and out of tune. A light touch is good for clear ringing chords.
    - The lower you go, use fewer notes. After all, the reason bass players usually play single notes an octave below the guitar, and why pianists usually play fifths or octaves with their left hand, is because of clarity. If you're into detuning or ERG's then this is something to keep in mind. Again, "distorsion makes it worse". Bumper sticker.
    - Adjust your intonation regularly.
    - Don't play the G chord. Never, ever play the G chord. :lol:

    Of less importance:
    - Make sure any ringing, rattling or resonating parts of your guitar are properly dampened. Stuff the tremolo cavity, tighten the vol and tone knobs, tie/tape the wires in the control cavity, make sure all hardware is tight and snug.
    - Make sure your frets are polished, even and neat.


    Beyond that, it's my experience that clarity mainly comes from sustain. Sustain = consistent volume of the fundamental frequency and its octaves, in relation to the other overtones. Distorsion makes the overtones louder, allowing them to garble up the sound, so if your guitar has poor sustain the distorsion will reduce the clarity more than it would on a guitar with good sustain. For example, I have a guitar that has no mojo, sounds super dull, but because of this it's great for big chords because each note you play on it sounds like a sine wave. If I were to play a G chord (which I never do, I swear :ugh: ), I use that guitar.
     
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  10. fps

    fps Kit

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    Oh my god, some of the suggestions here are absurd.

    Pick nearer the bridge, and work on your picking technique for playing a chord. If you want more clarity use the bridge pickup, lower gain, a coil split, or a combination of them.
     

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