Question for all the computer techies.

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Kingcrimson, Jun 3, 2017.

  1. Kingcrimson

    Kingcrimson Electra Glide

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    Have you ever contacted your ISP (Internet Service Provider) ex: Comcast, Cox, AT&T, Time Warner Cable, etcetera and asked them to provide you the information pertaining to which "Email Operating System" that they use to facilitate their email communications?

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    Last edited: Jun 3, 2017
  2. russmuller

    russmuller Cramblin' Contributor

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    Who told you to do that and why? That's not a term that means anything specific to me, so the more useful question is what is it you're trying to do and what problem are you having?

    "Email Operating System" sounds like something that some other company or service provider's support staff came up with as the best thing they could think of to describe whatever they believe the source of the problem is but know nothing about.

    Some ISP's will have your modem or connection blocked on certain ports that are commonly used to send spam email, so maybe they're referring to network policies with regards to that? So if you're trying to set up an email client with a private email address (i.e. king@crimson.net) and you can't send messages, maybe that's what they mean?

    Or perhaps they are referring to what kind of email protocol your ISP uses for the email address they provide for you (i.e. kingcrimson2006@cox.net, etc...)? Your email could be running on POP3, IMAP, or Echange servers. The settings to configure a program like Outlook to connect with the email account are different for each type, and you will need to know additional information like server addresses, security settings, and port numbers.
     
  3. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    +1. I've never setup an email server myself, but I've got a rough understanding of all the components involved. I'm pretty sure whoever came up with "email operating system" doesn't know how email works.
     
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  4. Kingcrimson

    Kingcrimson Electra Glide

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    russmuller, very good, but no cigar however I'll shoot you a batman. :)

    The difference between a consumer "email operating system" and a consumer "operating system" is that the EOS requires a OS as a platform to function. One example of many, Microsoft Exchange Server.

    A consumer incoming email server typically requires a mx record in DNS specifying the target email server where the messages to be received will be over either ports 110 (clear text) or 995 (encrypted text) a requirement from the EOS's server or communications cannot be established.

    A consumer outgoing email server typically requires a mx record in DNS specifying the target email server where the messages to be sent will be over either ports 25 (clear text) or 465 (encrypted text) a requirement from the EOS's server or communications cannot be established.

    The two encrypted ports above requires the secure connection type to be TLS (Transport Layer Security - top of the SMTP connection) the predecessor to SSL typically weak encrypted port 443 depending on its n-bit strength and collision resistance. Technically it can be altered by intermediate email relays. In the end, no Internet TCP/IP packet is 100% safe from being revealed.

    Military email/messaging systems implement a vastly different encryption method not available to the consumer or the civilian community.
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2017
  5. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    Who are you replying to exactly? What was the point of your original question if you seem to know everything about it already? Also, exchange is not an operating system.
     
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  6. Kingcrimson

    Kingcrimson Electra Glide

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    Ted, good morning sunshine.

    If you take notice you'll be clear that I'm am the original poster, therefore I'm not replying to anyone, exactly.

    If you read the 1st 6 words in this post "Have you ever contacted your ISP. . ." then you'll be closer to understanding what the direction of this initial post is.

    The word "exchange" alone is not a operating system. It can refer to many things: a unincorporated community, economics, a organized market, digital trade currency such as foreign, military exchange, top-level Internet domain - ".exchange", Internet exchange point (IX) the physical connection of ISPs, telephone, mezzanine, hotels or buildings.

    Microsoft Exchange Server, (disambiguation - removal of ambiguity) the focus here is the component part of a software platform operating system facilitating the "exchange" of messages in digital format, also.
     
  7. russmuller

    russmuller Cramblin' Contributor

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    So you posted a thread asking a question, not because you needed help with something, but just to conduct a sermon about email? I thought I was helping someone. I feel robbed somehow. This thread has been a waste of my time.
     
  8. TedEH

    TedEH Cromulent

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    ^ Agreed. Also not a big fan of being called 'sunshine'. Also Exchange is still not an operating system by any of the above definitions.
     
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