Power trio: tips for thicken the tone on leads

Discussion in 'Live Performance & Stage Sound' started by Rachmaninoff, Nov 5, 2016.

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  1. prlgmnr

    prlgmnr ...that kind of idea

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    Anyone else really like honey and butter on burnt toast? I mean, obviously not completely turned to carbon but certainly blackened a bit beyond well done.
     
  2. crankyrayhanky

    crankyrayhanky SS.org Regular

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  3. Bloody_Inferno

    Bloody_Inferno Silence is Violence

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    :agreed: In particular...

    Adding more examples.

    Stone Temple Pilots were a band I didn't really pay much attention to until I saw some live footage. Whenever a solo kicks in, Robert DeLeo still manages to fill the rhythmic space. I wasn't even complex bass lines, but they were so creatively weaved into the music that allowed Dean DeLeo to just wail away without worrying about what happens underneath. It's the same staple as what Billy Sheehan has done in every band he's been a part of.

    In the other end of the spectrum:



    During the Surfing tour, Satch only had a power trio. By the nature of his music, this is madness: how the hell is he going to fill musical space when he's constantly playing melodies and solos all night? Enter Stu Hamm. When I first heard that track on the Dreaming 11 EP, I thought Satch had a full band with a keyboardist and second guitarist. Then I saw the linear notes and was floored when I read that Hamm covered the harmonic foundations ALL BY HIMSELF. He wasn't even using effects either. It was all creative arrangement and playing. And it's awesome. Though it also helps that Satch was also adding extra embellishments all over the place too, but when you have a powerhouse rhythm section, you're free to just wail away.

    I remember joining my the prog band I play bass for now, when the guitarist was planning on getting a keyboard player, but completely shut that down after my audition and have remained a 1 guitar band ever since. And it was always the case every time I join a band as a bassist. It was a conscious decision on my end and it was something I took pride on. Of course we now have a keys player in the form of my foot triggering synth pedals. :lol:
     
  4. Rachmaninoff

    Rachmaninoff Amateur porn actor

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    I agree with most people here: the empty space should be filled by the bassist. I already use a wet/dry setup, with the "dry" adding a clean boost and a fair amount of delay. But the bass stays clean and doing a "pong-pong-pong" line.

    I'm now trying to solve this by arguing with the drummer about replacing our bassist. He's a very nice guy, a good friend but... besides being a bad bassist, he also doesn't contribute with backing vocals (important to our sound), so I'm convinced that at this point he's pretty much useless.

    Thanks for the great input, guys. :wavey:
     
  5. Semi-pro

    Semi-pro SS.org Regular

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    ^ I understand that it might be difficult to see firing someone as an option is he's a good guy. But it's not unusual having to choose between either having a good time with your best buddies or having a functional band
     
  6. vick1000

    vick1000 SS.org Regular

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    Age old solution.

    Get a human bieng to play rythm guitar?

    Failing at that, stereo chorus punched through the PA when needed.
     
  7. TonyFlyingSquirrel

    TonyFlyingSquirrel Cherokee Warrior

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    Some chorus to spread the image, mid to high depth, slow rate.
    Increased mids in the 1,100hz-5k sparingly, experiment with the "Q" width to taste.

    Any more than that, I'd consider beefing up the bass so that in the absence of rhythm guitar, that all your heft in your mix doesn't just drop out.
     
  8. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    Hmm, yeah, the age old "solution" to having personnel issues in a band - add more personnel.

    I've seen that so many times before, and have yet to observe it working. But, I do agree that a good rhythm player would make up for some of the bass player's absence, but it'll never fix the issue, IMO.
     
  9. GregoryP

    GregoryP SS.org Regular

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    This is how we're working around a missing guitar player at the moment:
    We added a guitar amp, and a couple ABY pedals.
    I use the stereo of some of my effects pedals, the last one (Mimiq) going into my amp and into ABY pedal 1.
    The bass goes into ABY pedal 2, going to his amp and ABY pedal 1. between ABY 2 and 1 we have a POG and big muff to spruce up the bass sound going into the additional amp. Whenever i'm playing ryhtm, it's coming out of 2 amps.
    When it's time to solo, the bass player steps on ABY 1 and then the bassline takes over rythm in the added amp. thanks to the POG & big Muff it sounds quite good actually.
    And i blast full solo out of my own amp.

    Edit: forgot to mention this part --> you can put the ABY 1 at your side of the stage/rehearsal room and kick it in when you're starting a solo, so the bass player doesn't have to.
     
  10. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    My old guitar teacher used a Boomerang pedal to play rhythm, loop it, then solo over the loop. Nowadays, loop pedals are much more affordable, so maybe that could be an option.

    But, to reinforce Gregory's point, I played out last weekend with an ABY and an octave pedal. While the wet tone is far from ideal, running that through a bass amp really thickened up the sound.

    If only there was a guitar with a divided pickup that had some algorithm to pick out only the lowest string played and then track that an octave lower, guitarists in two-piece bands and playing solo could really have a wonderful tool.

    On the other hand, though, nothing beats having a good three piece where everybody has found their space in the band and fills that space appropriately.
     
  11. P-Ride

    P-Ride SS.org Regular

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    If you're trying to fill in the gaps a rhythm guitarist might take, then a keen, engaged bassist to help close that gap sounds pretty key.

    By the sounds of it, you're trying to fill the space of a rhythm guitar completely alone AND make up for him too.
     

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