Petrucci's Rock Discipline: A good start or too advanced?

Discussion in 'Music Theory, Lessons & Techniques' started by silverabyss, Apr 9, 2018.

  1. jskershaw

    jskershaw SS.org Regular

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    Not sure if anyone has mentioned this, but a lot of really great modern players cite buying this DVD as the point at which they really saw a difference in their playing. As with everything, take it slowly at first, there's a lot on the DVD to digest.
     
  2. Zender

    Zender Tinkering, please hold.

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    TL:DR RD is not "too advanced" but it really does take discipline, and it misses out on basic technique on what to do exactly with your hands. It's tabs, but not which finger goes where, and how to go from string to string. Also, no description of how to mute all over the place.

    That being said.

    RD has some very nice exercises, but it is missing essentials. Take the right-hand string skipping excersise for instance. You need to be muting everyhting you don't want to hear, but RD does not go into any details i nhow to do that. Also, if you look at the video, you see Petrucci "rolling" his ringfinger from the 4th to 5th string in that exercise. But you won't notice this unless you've been shown that technique at least once.
    Years ago, I tried working through it by myself, but gave up. Everything was messy and noisy. Now I have a new teacher, one who actually did show me muting techniques, string rolling, and other stuff. And now RD makes sense I can actually play the examples (albeit slowly).

    RD is something that can really supplement your learning, but it's not a standalone book. Metal-specific I went with Stetina's series (rhythm 1&2, lead 1&2, fretboard mastery, speed mechanics... ). And am currently still working my way through all that. Whilst RD is also on the side, and anything I can find only that tickles my fancy. I'm a huge Steve Morse en John Petrucci fan, and they both made some awesome instruction videos.

    This is next to everything that my teacher gives me, which for the last year has been almost exclusively patterns over scales. III, II, I, IV, III, II, V, IV, III, VI, V, IV, VII, VI, V, VIII, VII, VI For instance, over an A pentatonic minor in the 5th position. I've done alot of these sequences. (2 notes, 3 notes, 4 notes) in all directions, such that now whenever I land on one of the notes of such a scale, I can flow to any other note with a nice flourishing of other notes within the scale or just run op or down in that scale on that position, or shift from one position to another.
    Part one of my lessons with my teacher is this, the second is playing technique, wherein the focus lies with playing as clean as possible, whilst the gain is dimed, and I don't have a noice gate. Trust me, you'll learn to mute ALL THE THINGS. Although it can take me hours to get a sequence silent, it gets easier each time.

    One day I will play "Tumeni notes" they way it should be played. :D

    Side-note, I'm 35... and only started serious playing a few years ago. I've replaced youthful enthousiasm with extreme perseverence, and the ability to play one scale on one position for half an hour without loosing focus whilst excersising. Discipline is on my side. ;)
     
  3. silverabyss

    silverabyss Contributor

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    FWIW I farted around with a cheap musicyo kramer for 2-3 years as a teen but got waylaid by anime and video games, now I'm 29 basically starting over again without any aspirations other than making a few death metal and death/metalcore cover videos on youtube when(if ever) I "git gud"
     
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  4. NateFalcon

    NateFalcon ...but I like Timaru...

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    JP’s receding hairline is pretty advanced...
     
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  5. Zender

    Zender Tinkering, please hold.

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    So is his beard.
     
  6. prlgmnr

    prlgmnr ...that kind of idea

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    Any day now it's going to recede all the way and he can finally reveal that he's just been Kerry King this whole time.
     
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  7. NateFalcon

    NateFalcon ...but I like Timaru...

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    Man, he’d have to REALLY dumb down his playing while being Kerry...

    ...And have a split personality shared with a total dick!
     
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  8. NateFalcon

    NateFalcon ...but I like Timaru...

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    Troy Stetina is badass!! Btw...I learned the ‘metal lead guitar’ book, I thought the voice intro’s and song names were corny but I definitely improved my dexterity on scales and whatnot...maybe a good step before Petrucci’s Discipline
     
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  9. khm

    khm SS.org Regular

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    I thought Petrucci's Wild Stringdom was pretty useful as well as Troy Stetinas Speed Mechanics for Leads Guitar, I also made sure I rolled off any gain when trying up my faster picking, as it made me concentrate more on precision and technique, then when I whacked the lead channel back on, it was so much clearer and tighter! I have to thank my old man for that idea, when I was a kid all I wanted to learn was heavy metal, but he refused to buy me a distortion pedal until I could play all his favorite hank Marvin and the Shadows tracks!! Apache still haunts my nightmares all these years later!
     
  10. Deadpool_25

    Deadpool_25 SS.org Regular

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    @silverabyss , your story sounds somewhat familiar. I can tell you I have a TON of DVDs, books, and e-lessons. Rock Discipline is often recommended and I can see why it's highly respected but I just didn't jive with it (yet).

    For starting out, I like Troy Stetina's stuff (I have Metal Rhythm, Metal Lead, and Fretboard Logic). There's one thing Troy said that I haven't heard anyone else say (although I'm sure others must have). He said (paraphrasing) that you should learn techniques that are right for whatever level you're currently at. That seems pretty obvious but many lesson materials quickly have you learning things you haven't been properly positioned to learn. Often they're somewhat out of context as well which is fine later on, but in the early stages can get boring. For example, practicing chord changes and scales out of context, though having a great deal of value, can get boring. Of course, if you have tons of fun practicing chord changes and scales on their own, do that. :)
     
  11. devastone

    devastone SS.org Regular

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    Stetina's stuff is great, definitely sounds like Speed Mechanics is a good first choice. The Lead books are great also (went through them a couple of decades ago).
     
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  12. LiveOVErdrive

    LiveOVErdrive CNC hack

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    A teacher is the best place to start if you can afford lessons.

    Rock discipline is pretty hilarious. I mean the general message (start slow and work up with the metronome) is a good one, but petrucci himself is just so far beyond the skill of a normal human that when he "starts slow" it is still comically fast.

    +1 for Guitar grimoire exercise book and a metronome too.
     

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