Petrucci's Rock Discipline: A good start or too advanced?

Discussion in 'Music Theory, Lessons & Techniques' started by silverabyss, Apr 9, 2018.

  1. silverabyss

    silverabyss

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    My technique and theory is basically non existent, I saw a Ben Eller video today where he recommended it. I'm thinking about getting some of Troy Stetina's books (Speed Mechanics and Fretboard Mastery to start with) but I need at least one book to really grind at and kick my ass (and the PDF is free and the DVD is on youtube) Heard Gilberts videos are quite essential too

    What say ye
     
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  2. KnightBrolaire

    KnightBrolaire despair ahead

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    buy a scale book. practice alt picking ad nauseam. bonus points if you can go through multiple positions of the same scale without flubbing. I'd say that's the bare minimum if you want a minor grasp on scales *pun not intended* The guitar grimoire has a metric ton of useful info. Same with the guitar technique encyclopedia.
    Petrucci's stuff is really good too, especially if you want to work on your sweeps/alt picking.
    brett garsed's instructionals are really good and are floating around on youtube. marshall harrison/allen hinds also have some excellent stuff on actual legato (ie like holdsworth).
    whenever I get bored of trying to get better at playing scales/metal I find another genre and try to nick riffs or techniques from them/incorporate them back into metal.
     
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  3. silverabyss

    silverabyss

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    Rock Fusion?
     
  4. KnightBrolaire

    KnightBrolaire despair ahead

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    yeah that one.
     
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  5. Redwind

    Redwind WhatisthisIdon'teven

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    best instructional vid I ever skipped to :50 and never watched the rest of!
     
  6. Eptaceros

    Eptaceros Wayfarer Contributor

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    I wouldn't consider Rock Discipline too advanced. You just take the resources at your own pace. Hell, I spent 2 years learning Necrophagist songs when I've only been playing for a couple years. For the majority of those 2 years, I just played things around half speed and slowly built speed as the hours amassed.
     
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  7. bostjan

    bostjan MicroMetal Contributor

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    The dubbed version is hilarious:



    But yeah, it's probably not the best place to start. IMO - it's a decent resource to go to if you feel you've hit a wall with techniques. The basic stuff he covers, like stretching out before and after playing, I can simply tell you in the thread - stretch your elbows, fingers, and wrists, before and after playing. :lol:

    In fact, probably instructional videos in general aren't really the best resource if you feel you have developed bad technique or if you are getting frustrated trying to develop any techniques. Instead, maybe try a lesson or two in real time, so that your instructor can point out technique problems as feedback.
     
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  8. silverabyss

    silverabyss

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    At the same time I wish Vogg, Luc Lemay, Shaune Kelly or Doug Cerrito made instructional videos
     
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  9. TonyFlyingSquirrel

    TonyFlyingSquirrel Cherokee Warrior

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    Frank Gambale, Speed Picking.
    Essential to good technique.

    Also, Marty Freidman has a really good one where he spends a considerable time going over building phrasing.
     
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  10. Drew

    Drew Forum MVP

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    I'd suggest grabbing Speed Mechanics for Lead Guitar first - it's a pretty good primer on the building blocks of the technique you'll need for advanced "shred" playing.

    That said, neither that nor Rock Dicipline really get into theory all that far. Learning a whole bunch of scales is a start, but you're going to want something on how and where to use them. Honestly, I don't even know where I'd start for recommending a book on that subject - I'm not really aware of a ton of guitar-centric intro to theory books that would give you at least enough of a foundation to cover rock guitar.
     
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  11. silverabyss

    silverabyss

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    FWIW Id like to achieve some modicum of technique before I get too far down the theory rabbit hole (I already kind of understand that notes on the fretboard go in a certain order cross all 6 strings and the note of each string is the starting point and it starts over again at fret 12 but I admit I don’t have a shit’s clue about modes and intervals and only have a cursory understanding of the difference between major and minor tonality

    Definitely going to try to get speed mechanics though, I got about 20 minutes into rock discipline and the fretting hand stretches made my brain explode
     
  12. eightsixboy

    eightsixboy あなたのお母さんを犯さ

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    Depends on what you want to focus on. If you want to focus on alt picking then this is probably the best place to start, or one of Frank Gambales instructional.

    The Brett Garsed one is very good as well but obviously more legato and theory based.

    The Steve Morse one is also great for picking exercises.

     
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  13. silverabyss

    silverabyss

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    I guess I want the following things:

    -chord accuracy and grip strength/proper muting (and fretting hand dex for weird chords)
    -fast and rythmically accurate down picked chromatic chug runs and tremolo picking (death metal riffing)
    -krallice-like black metal strumming/trem picking speed
    -that weird alt-picking arpeggiated chord sound like in Necrophagist riffs and Skin Coffin
    -pinches

    before siccckkk shreds/lead skill, (vibrato, legato, bends, sweeps)

    Concerns

    -my fingers are thick and short as hell to the point where if I'm doing chromatic exercises its almost like I can't bend my wrist and fingers enough around to fret 1-4 on the low string without PAAAAIN even wearing my guitar high on a strap. Even doing power chords that high (elevation) on the neck is uncomfortable and its having me wonder how the FUCK do guys get on with baritones let along fender scale. Do I just need to stretch my left wrist and fingers more?

    smack me if I'm being to much of a weenie
     
  14. KnightBrolaire

    KnightBrolaire despair ahead

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    the only way to get good at any of that stuff is to practice like a mother fucker. remember how I told you to do scale runs to work on your alt picking? that works for trem picking or down picking or chromatics too. pinch harmonics are all about finding the right harmonic node and having the right pick attack (ie go watch some youtube vids on it).
    those scale runs? yeah you can also practice string skipping or build arpeggios out of them (arppegios are just chords that you pick each note individually in).
    Pain is bad. warm up more, stretch more, play more. Good technique really helps mitigate pain in the long run. I used to trem pick more with my elbow, and I started getting tennis elbow, now I trem pick more with my wrist and a little bit of elbow and have no problems.
    Crawl, walk, and then you can run.
     
  15. TheTrooper

    TheTrooper SS.org Regular

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    Rock Discipline is great, but it doesn't really cover what You're after.
    There are some INCREDIBLE exercises for isolating picking across the strings and picked arpeggios, but most are (as called by John) "Scale fragments".
    Chord building is limited compared to the other stuff, but some of the stuff is really hard to master the way JP played it.
    Great chromatic lines, and the introduction to each chapter has some improvs that are fantastic.
     
  16. silverabyss

    silverabyss

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    how is Rick Beato?
     
  17. pfizer

    pfizer SS.org Regular

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    Rock Discipline is really more for technique than theory.

    John's a good instructor and the exercises in his vid are pretty effective but I'd recommend supplementing his video with something else. RD has a lot of great exercises but it's called "discipline" for a reason -- it's work, and the examples aren't exactly fun to play. They will improve your technique though; even the warm-ups are quite tricky.

    Personally, I'd try and track down copies of Lick Library featuring Danny Gill. He's a great instructor and his Rock Guitar in 6 Weeks or his Rock Essentials/Concepts/Advanced series should get you up and running with the basic pentatonic and blues scales quickly.

    Another great guy to learn theory from is Justin Sandercoe -- a ton of his stuff is up for free on Youtube. Start with his Beginner Course, then you can go to his Intermediate Course and go to his Blues Lead and Rhythm courses. For completeness, Justin's course is the way to go; he goes over rhythm, chords, scales, time signatures, ear training, etc.
     
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  18. silverabyss

    silverabyss

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    Sweet, I was starting to get option paralysis from all these suggestions, I'll look into Sandercoe and Lick Library (Andy James Metal Rhythm in 6 weeks seems like 100% what I'm looking for)
     
  19. justin_time

    justin_time has terrible gear

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    +1 for Justin Sandercoe if you are looking at finding and closing gaps to become a more well-rounded guitar player. Practice routines are not based solely on technique - emphasis is placed on transcribing, music theory, and ear training. Of course if you just want to become a shredder playing a million notes a second then spending most of your practice time on technique maybe makes sense.

    I personally prefer to find a couple riffs from songs that I like to practice on for improving a specific technique, it makes it a bit more fun.
     
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  20. Zalbu

    Zalbu More time than skill

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    Rick Beato is very advanced and mostly covers jazz theory and similar stuff, so I wouldn't recommend him, although he did just release a 40 minute video about the basics of music theory that's worth checking out.



    Some guys on Youtube I've found recently that explains things in ways that makes sense to me are Ross Campbell, The-Art-Of-Guitar and Robert Baker.

    But the first thing you should do before learning the scales is to watch these two videos, these are the things I wish I knew when I started learning theory.





    The TL;DW is learn the notes of the fretboard, learn intervals and learn what makes the modes sound different to each other, and what notes are raised or lowered. For example, the Lydian scale is the Major scale with a raised fourth and the Phrygian scale is the Minor scale with a lowered second. Don't just learn the shapes of the modes on the fretboard, you need to be able to play them all over the neck and not just locked into one position.

    A good way to practice this is to learn the Major and Minor scale, and then look at what notes need to be raised or lowered to play the different modes instead of just looking at the shapes.
     
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